Workplace Health, Safety, & Compensation Commission Rates High on Survey

By conducting surveys, different organizations and companies can gauge what is and is not working.

 

With that in mind, the Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Commission (the Commission) for Newfoundland and Labrador (Canada) recently unveiled the results of its 2012 client service surveys.

 

The injured worker and employer surveys each sampled 300 individuals at random and the results are accurate to within +/- 5.6 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

 

 

Nearly 80 Percent of Employers Give a Thumbs Up

 

In 2012, 78 percent of employers surveyed gave a good or excellent rating for their overall opinion of the Commission; 73 percent were completely or mostly satisfied with the overall quality of service and 75 percent stated they were for the most part or completely satisfied regarding their overall experience.

 

In 2012, 64 percent of injured workers surveyed provided a rating of good or excellent for their overall opinion of the Commission; 65 percent of injured workers surveyed claimed to be completely or mostly satisfied with the overall quality of service and 55 percent stated they found themselves mostly or completely satisfied with their overall experience.

 

“It is important to seek input from our clients so we can improve service while still fulfilling all of our obligations under the Workplace Health, Safety and Compensation Act,” stated Commission CEO Leslie Galway. “We are using the survey results to help guide our client service strategy and are undertaking several initiatives in 2013 to further improve service delivery.”

 

 

First-time Survey With a Defined Client Population

 

The Commission also surveyed 200 injured workers and employers who participated in early and safe return-to-work programs, the first time it has undertaken such a survey with a defined client population.

 

Along with asking general questions regarding their overall experience with the Commission, questions were asked on their experience with the early and safe return to work program.

 

More than half of injured workers and employers were completely or mostly satisfied with the program and feel the program has been beneficial.

 

A pair of key findings from the survey showed that injured workers surveyed want to be more active in their early and safe return-to-work plans and there are opportunities for Commission staff to provide assistance to employers on their return to work plans and implementation.

 

 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2013 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Second Death in Six Months Leads to Employer Paying Largest Possible Fine

 

Employer to Pay Largest Possible Fine
 
The owner of Yukon's (Canada) Wolverine Mine has settled and agreed to pay a $150,000 fine, the largest possible, following an accident two years ago that killed a worker, according to a report from The Canadian Press.
 
Yukon Zinc Corp., and contractor Procon Mining and Tunnelling offered a guilty plea recently to charges tied to a collapse which killed 25-year-old Will Fisher.
 
 
Buried Beneath 70 Tons of Rock
 
Fisher was a mechanic for Procon when he was buried beneath 70 tons of rock on April 25, 2010 in the mine 118 miles northwest of Watson Lake.
 
He and other employees had been servicing equipment used to install support in the walls and ceiling of the underground mine. The two other employees were not seriously hurt.
 
Judge John Faulkner was to follow up the fine with a decision on how much Procon will pay for its role in Fisher's death, but a Yukon government lawyer is seeking the same $150,000 fine.
 
The court heard that during the night shift prior to the collapse occurring, water in the tunnel caused the ground under the rock bolter equipment to become soft and the machine to get stuck. The soft ground had to be dug out.
 
Yukon Zinc was deemed responsible for, among other things, providing geo-technical support and a plan for ground support for the mine, but the company said it relied on Procon's safety program.
 
 
Inadequate Safety Program
 
An expert brought in after Fisher's death concluded the mishap was caused by inadequate ground support, given that the tunnel had been widened and dug out.
 
A second expert concluded the safety program at the mine was not ''robust or comprehensive enough for the type of operation or high hazard environment,'' the agreed statement of facts reads.
 
 
Second Death in 6 Months
 
This is not the first time an employee has died at the mine.
 
Six months before Fisher's death, 20-year-old Paul Wentzell, an apprentice mechanic with Procon, was crushed by a driverless Toyota Land Cruiser.
 
Procon pleaded guilty to two charges under the Occupational Health and Safety Act and was fined close to $100,000.
 
In the six months prior to Fisher's death, there were three ground falls at the mine, the court was told.
 
 
Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com
 
©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Employer Lucky Poor Safety Did Not Lead to Employee Death

 

13 Safety and Health Violations, 11 Are Serious
 
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently cited Lapmaster Precision Finishing Services LLC in Dayton with 13 safety and health violations. Proposed fines total $65,500 following an inspection that OSHA initiated upon receiving a complaint alleging hazards.
 
"Lapmaster Precision Finishing Services is compromising its workers by failing to evaluate their exposure to and correct hazardous conditions," said Bill Wilkerson, OSHA's area director in Cincinnati. "Training workers is vital to their long-term safety and health. OSHA is committed to protecting workers."
 
Eleven serious violations include failing to develop energy control and hazard communication programs, train employees on the programs' requirements, provide machine guarding on belts and grinding machines, lock out the energy sources of machinery prior to servicing, require the use of safety glasses, ensure that workers are not exposed to live electrical parts, provide workers with personal protective equipment and training to minimize electrical exposure, train and certify employees who operate powered industrial vehicles, and properly store materials that can cause "struck-by" hazards.
 
 
Serious Violation Carries Substantial Probability of Death
 
A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.
 
Two other-than-serious violations involve a failure to maintain injury and illness forms and a lack of written certification of a hazard assessment. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.
 
Lapmaster Precision Finishing Services is a part of Mt. Prospect, Ill.-based Lapmaster International LLC. About 48 workers are employed at the Dayton facility, which processes cast iron, steel and several metal alloys as well as plastics, Teflon, ceramics and composite materials to finish tolerances for automotive and other manufacturing applications.
 
 
Company Has 15 Business Days to Comply
 
The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA's area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.
 
 
Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com
 
©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Simple Safety Steps Could Have Avoided Fall and Fine

 

A Cwmbran, Wales builder has been fined after an employee was seriously injured in a 7.5 ft fall from the roof of a property near Llandegfedd Reservoir.

 

 

Broke Left Femur in Fall

 

According to a report from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Andrew Hosking, 34, broke his left femur and had to be airlifted to hospital following the incident at Glascoed Lane, Glascoed, on 17 October 2011. He has been off work ever since.

Colleague Anthony Skarratts, 20, also fell from the roof, but escaped injury.

 

Abergavenny Magistrates’ Court heard recently that the duo were part of a team of workers undertaking a roof installation for Paul Siviter, trading as Paul Siviter General Builder.

 

 

Beam Broke and Landed on Bath Tub

 

They were standing on an old wooden roof beam balanced less than 10 feet above the ground, in order to receive A-frame trusses from a telehander and assemble them into position. The beam broke in half and both men fell inwards to the ground below, with Mr Hosking hitting the edge of a disused bath tub beneath. It was this impact that caused his injury.

 

An investigation by the HSE found that although there was scaffolding in place around the exterior of the building, there were no measures in place to prevent workers falling from height within the building, such as birdcage scaffolding or mobile elevated work platforms.

 

 

Builder Pleaded Guilty

 

The investigation also found that Paul Siviter’s own site-specific risk assessment identified that the work activity would involve working at height above 6.5 feet and identified ‘appropriate scaffolding’ as a necessary precaution to take.

 

The builder, of Garn Wen Farm, Belle Vue Lane, Cwmbran, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 6(3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. He was fined $12,850 and ordered to pay full costs of $4,750.

 

 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Employer Drops The Ball on Asbestos Safety

 

In recent testimony in a Welsh courtroom, it was reported that employees of one company had exposure to dangerous asbestos fibers, this after a catalogue of errors by an engineering company and a building firm during a demolition and refurbishment project in Swansea.
 
As Health and Safety Executive (HSE) reports, allegations during testimony say that the project suffered from bad mismanagement, untrained staff placed in charge of the operation, and an underpinning of inadequate surveys for the presence of asbestos to go with poor planning throughout.
 
Neath Magistrates' Court heard that Wall Colmonoy Ltd had contracted Oaktree Construction to renovate a building opposite its premises in Pontardawe, Swansea, in December 2010 so it could further its operations.
 
 
Surveys Deemed to be Inadequate
 
The engineering firm had a pair of asbestos management surveys for the site, which, although later found to be inadequate, revealed the presence of asbestos material and highlighted other areas, such as the ceiling voids, which were thought to be harboring asbestos.
 
Even with this knowledge, work got the go-ahead in the building. Trebanos-based Oaktree had been advised by HSE that a separate 'Refurbishment and Demolition Survey' was also necessary before any activity commenced.
 
During the demolition works an asbestos insulation board (AIB) covering a steel column was damaged, and a Wall Colmonoy employee was informed that they should tape a plastic bags around it. Work went on in the building for a number of months with the AIB debris left sitting on the floor until an unannounced visit was undertaken by an HSE inspector.
 
A subsequent HSE investigation reported that Wall Colmonoy failed to appoint a competent Construction, Design and Management coordinator and principal contractor to plan and oversee the construction work. In addition, they ignored advice from its own health and safety manager to notify HSE of the demolition phase of the project, as is required by law.
 
Testimony was put forth that Wall Colmonoy did not provide a proper assessment of the presence of asbestos and its condition in the building prior to work beginning. The surveys they held were poor, as a licensed asbestos removal contractor had warned the information they had at their disposal was inadequate.
 
 
Skills Were Lacking to Address Health and Safety
 
No-one involved in the management of the project had the skills, training or experience to address health and safety issues, including the risk of asbestos exposure, according to information presented to the court. The company reportedly made no efforts to remove or control the risks from the asbestos materials that had been identified in the reports.
 
The HSE investigation also claimed that Oaktree failed to prevent the exposure of its employees to asbestos, and failed to maintain its spread once damage had occurred.
 
The company failed to provide a 'Refurbishment and Demolition Survey' and its own risk assessment was not up to speed because it failed to identify the risks from asbestos.
 
Lastly, Oaktree failed to carry out a structural assessment of the building and did not come forward to its staff with asbestos awareness training, despite a recommendation by the HSE in September 2010.
 
Wall Colomony, of Alloy Industrial Estate, Pontardawe, was fined in total $25,000 and ordered to pay $5,300 in costs after pleading guilty to breaching Sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974.
 
Oaktree Construction (Wales) Ltd, of Pheasant Road, Trebanos, was hit with fines of $12,875 with costs of $3,200 after pleading guilty to breaching Regulations 16 and 11(1) (a) of the of the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006.
 
 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

5 Safety Communication Techniques for a Diverse Workforce

 

Communicating safety issues effectively to a diverse workforce is a challenge. As a risk management consultant for many years, I’ve gathered solid information and experience on the best way to communicate safety and workers’ compensation messages to a large and diverse workforce, including organizations with thousands of employees with diverse backgrounds and many different job descriptions.

 

Before beginning, identify your target audience and the safety message you want to give.  The most important thing an employer must do before implementing any safety communication program is meet with employees and supervisors to discover their ideas on what needs to be communicated and how best to do it.

 

 

Five Safety Communication Techniques

 

First:

Identify the specific message you want to communicate. Is the message about getting employees to work more safely around certain equipment? Or is it to provide information on steps to take if they are injured?

 

Second: Identify the skill set and grade level of your audience. A message to upper management on how to improve commitment to a safety program would be presented differently than instructions to first-line employees on how to report an accident. A general rule of thumb for thinking about language levels is to keep in mind that the Wall Street Journal is written at a first-year college level, while the Reader’s Digest is written at a sixth grade reading level.

 

Third:  Consider job functions and how best to get your message across. Some employees might spend most of their work day in an office or one specific area of a plant. Others may spend it working in different areas of the plant or facility. Still others may spend their day driving from location to location. It’s a good idea to tailor your safety message to the types of safety issues more likely to affect those employees and areas of work.

 

Fourth: Identify the languages your employees speak. Don’t assume they will be just English and/or Spanish. There may be other immigrant groups, such as Russian or Vietnamese speaking workers. In addition, there are differences within languages, such as Cuban Spanish and Puerto Rican Spanish. Ask management to survey their workers’ languages and provide all safety messages as appropriate.

 

Fifth: Consider the work environment. If you have a congenial workforce, don’t use a heavy-handed communication style. Save it for a workforce where there may be a lot of discontent and resentment.

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Small, Low Risk Businesses to Receive Free Online Safety Guidance

 

Online Guidance Designed for Small, Low-Risk Business
 
A radical revamp of the way British small businesses access official advice about health and safety online has been launched.
 
According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the new Health and Safety Toolbox is the latest in a package of online guidance, bringing together in one place everything a small, low-risk business could need to manage health and safety. Written with busy firms in mind, it makes it easy to find relevant guidance on specific risks with a few clicks of the mouse.
 
It builds on Health and Safety Made Simple which provides sufficient basic information for large numbers of low risk businesses.
 
 
Will Help Business Owners Avoid Wasting Time and Money
 
The package of guidance – developed by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) with the support of businesses – will help business owners and employers avoid wasting precious time reading what they don't need to, wasting money on unnecessary bureaucracy or resorting to hiring costly consultants.
 
Judith Hackitt, the HSE chair, noted, "This package is everything small and low risk businesses could need to manage health and safety, online and free.
 
"It will help businesses save time and money by getting them focusing on the real risks, guiding them to what is relevant for them and steering them away from what's not.
 
"By going online and working through it for themselves, for free, we hope low-risk SMEs will realize that they don't need expensive consultancy or reams of paperwork to manage their responsibilities. It is of no benefit to businesses or workers if over the top precautions are introduced."
 
 
Simple Guides to Control Common Workplace Hazards
 
Quick, simple guides and interactive tools on how to identify, assess and control common workplace hazards have been pulled together for the first time. Core health and safety issues relating to the type of business, its workforce and workplace are set out more simply than ever before.
 
Sections on the most common risks – such as manual handling, trip hazards and harmful substances – as well as tips on protective equipment are set out in plain English.
 
The Toolbox and Health and Safety Made Simple are part of HSE's work to make it simpler and clearer for businesses to understand, manage and control workplace risks. A full review of all HSE's written guidance is also being carried out. 
 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Australia Seeing Huge Work Comp Improvements With Mentor Program

 

Large & Small Businesses Pair Together to Address Safety
 
Australia’s WorkCover  New South Wales (NSW) is calling for small and large businesses from Sydney and the Illawarra to take part in its 2012/13 Mentor Program.
 
The WorkCover Mentor Program involves large businesses pairing with a small business from the same industry to help them identify new ways to address safety in their workplace.
 
 
Small Businesses Gain Industry Specific Advice From Mentor
 
General Manager of WorkCover’s Work Health and Safety Division, John Watson, said the Mentor Program enabled small businesses to gain industry-specific advice on how to meet their workplace safety, injury management and workers compensation obligations.
 
“Workplace injury, illness and fatality continue to be a significant cost to industry and the NSW community, and WorkCover understands how challenging it can be for small businesses to dedicate time and resources to work health and safety,” Watson commented.
 
“The WorkCover Mentor Program provides small business with access to expert advice and assistance from a large business within their industry who understands the work health and safety challenges they face and can suggest innovative solutions to everyday problems.
 
 
330 Businesses Participate, 95% Success Rate
 
“More than 330 businesses have taken part in the Program since it commenced with 95 per cent of last year’s mentees implementing work health and safety improvements after participating in the program.
 
“Every worker wants to return home safely at the end of the working day and WorkCover recognizes that the support of business through initiatives like the Mentor Program is essential to improving work health and safety across the State,” Watson added.
 
Melinda Leyshon, managing director of western Sydney licensed mechanics, Production Automotive, added the Mentor Program provided the opportunity for a small business to gain a better understanding of work health and safety and check that they had effective systems in place.
 
 
Keep Employees Safe By Working On Your Business
 
“We are a family business and want everyone to go home from work safe,” Leyshon noted. “The Program gave us a lot of confidence that we were heading in the right direction in relation to safety and also massively increased our knowledge and understanding of work health and safety. Without a doubt I would encourage other small businesses to participate. It’s the best time you will spend working on your business rather than in your business.”
 
Following an official launch on Oct. 9, 2012, the Mentor Program will be rolled-out to other regions of NSW during 2013.
 
Mentees are also eligible to apply for a $500 rebate after making a safety improvement in their workplace (terms and conditions apply). For more information on the WorkCover Mentor Program 2012-13, visit www.workcover.nsw.gov.au.
 
 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

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MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Important Fatalities Number Shows Decline, Overall Injuries Increase in Singapore

Fatalities, Major Injuries, Days Lost All See Decreases

 

A new report on Singapore indicates the number of workplace fatalities and major injuries has dropped in the first half this year.

 

According to the latest Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Statistics Report, there were 26 workplace fatalities over the first six months of 2012, a decrease from 31 in the same period last year.

 

There were 246 cases of major injuries, a slight decrease of 3 percent compared to the same period last year. This contributed to a 6 percent dip in man-days lost due to work incidents.

 

 

Minor Injuries See 11.3% Increase

 

As for minor injuries, there were 5,001 cases, or a 11.3 percent jump compared to the same period last year.

 

Overall workplace injuries – which includes fatalities – grew by 10.4 percent.

 

Occupational diseases (ODs) also increased by nearly 67 percent to 603, from 360 over the same period last year. The most common OD (89 percent) is noise-induced deafness followed by occupational skin diseases. The manufacturing sector continued to tally the largest number of OD cases, accounting for 51 percent of total ODs, up from 39 percent of cases as at end June last year.

 

 

Construction, Marine, and Manufacturing See Decreases in Fatalities

 

The Construction, Marine and Manufacturing sectors saw a drop in the number of fatalities.

 

There were 17 fatalities, compared to 25 in the same period last year. However these three sectors saw an increase in major injuries (8 percent) and minor injuries (25 percent).

 

Other sectors (including accommodation, food services, waste management, logistics and transport) contributed to about 35 percent of total work fatalities in the first half of this year, up from 19 percent in the same period last year.

 

Many of these cases were slips, trips and falls from heights as well as workers struck by moving or falling objects.

 

As for major injuries, these sectors witnessed a 14 percent decline while minor injuries saw a marginal 2 percent increase. The logistics and transport, accommodation and food services as well as health sectors accounted for 13 percent of major injuries.

 

 

<pAuthor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

WorkSafe Begins Phase 2 of Workplace Safety Program

 

 

Phase II of WorkSafeBC’s (British Columbia) combustible dust strategy began recently, and has been expanded to include similar wood processing operations where dust accumulation could be a safety hazard.

 

Until the end of the year, WorkSafeBC officers will be inspecting up to 280 B.C. employers registered in the wood and paper products sub-sectors. Inspections will focus on dust cleanup, ventilation, and dust control issues.

 

Wood processing and paper product operations have been selected because of their high risk of combustible dust explosion due to large amounts of dust produced or handled in these facilities,” said Betty Pirs, vice president, Prevention Services. “Like all WorkSafeBC inspections, orders will be issued to employers based on violations observed during the inspections.”

 

WorkSafeBC aims to complete the first round of inspections by late August, and will be following up with employers to ensure they are in compliance with the Workers Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Regulation in regard to combustible dust and potential safety hazards.

 

Phase two inspections will also include sawmill facilities inspected as part of Phase I, that are continuing to face challenges in maintaining compliance.

 

Phase I of the combustible dust strategy was initiated in April 2012 after wood dust was suspected as a factor in the explosions at Babine Forest Products in Burns Lake and Lakeland Mills in Prince George. These two sawmills exploded within three months of each other, killing four workers and seriously injuring dozens more.

 

On April 26, 2012, WorkSafeBC issued a directive order to the province’s 173 sawmills to conduct a full hazard identification, risk assessment, and safety review, with particular focus on combustible dust; dust accumulation; and potential ignition sources.

 

Since the directive order was issued, WorkSafeBC has been following up with employers to ensure the ordered actions have been taken and that sawmills are in compliance with the Workers Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Regulation with regard to combustible dust and potential safety hazards. The status of the inspections and compliance is posted on WorkSafeBCsWebsite.

 

 

<pAuthor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact:  mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

 
WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

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