Excess Workers’ Compensation Insurance 101

Excess Workers Compensation Insurance 101

Self-insured employers purchase excess insurance coverage to limit the risk of exposure to catastrophic injuries. This is often accomplished by having a workers compensation policy with a high deductible. Common deductibles for excess insurance are $250,000, $500,000 and $1,000,000.  The self-insured employer needs to carefully analyze the amount of risk that is financially feasible before deciding on the deductible for the excess insurance.

 

 

The excess insurer has a strong interest in knowing about the workers compensation claims that have the potential to exceed the self-insured employer’s deductible. The insurance contract will normally state the self-insured employer must report to the excess insurer any time the reserve amount on a self-insured employer’s workers comp claim equals half of the deductible amount.

 

 

Any Injury With Potential To Exceed Deductible Should Be Reported

 

The excess insurance contract will call for the self-insured employer to report all “catastrophic” claims, regardless of the dollar amount of the claim.  This could include

 

  • Fatalities
  • Amputation of a major extremity
  • Spinal cord – quadriplegic, hemiplegic and paraplegic injuries
  • Brain and brain stem injuries
  • Comas
  • Burns over more than 25% of the body
  • Severe disfigurement and scarring, where applicable
  • Loss of eyesight
  • Loss of hearing
  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes
  • Multiple surgical interventions
  • Rape and sexual assault
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Occupational disease claims
  • Non-union of bone fractures
  • Damage to organs – lungs, liver, heart, stomach, etc.

 

 

This list is not all inclusive.  Any injury that has the potential to exceed the self-insured employer’s deductible should be reported to the excess insurer. The report to the excess insurer should be completed by the third party claims administrator adjuster or the self-insured employer’s internal claims adjuster as soon as the information becomes available that there is the potential for the claim to exceed the self-insured employer’s deductible.  The failure to report the claim timely (within the requirements of the excess insurance policy) could create a situation where the excess insurer denies coverage, or accepts the claim under a reservation of rights which allows them to deny coverage after thoroughly investigating the matter.

 

 

 

Review Specific Reporting Requirements of Excess Insurer

 

The report to the excess insurer should include the basic information about the workers compensation claim. This includes:

 

  • The facts surrounding the injury
  • Compensability
  • The nature and extent of the injury
  • The medical management of the claim
  • The amount already spent on the claim
  • The reserves for the future cost of the claim
  • Subrogation potential
  • Any other offsets of cost
  • Any Medicare or Medicaid issues
  • The action plan to bring the claim to a conclusion
  • The litigation management plan, if applicable

 

 

The self-insured employer at the start of the excess insurance policy should review with the excess insurer the specific reporting requirements of the excess insurer. A diligent effort by the self-insured employer to comply with the requirements of the excess insurer must be made.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Ohio Employer Facing Nearly $150K in Fines for Safety Violations

An Ohio ethanol production facility faces $149,800 in federal penalties after federal inspectors found multiple violations of chemical and grain-handling standards at Three Rivers Energy LLC.

 
On May 6, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued 42 serious and four other-than serious safety and health violations following three separate inspections at the bio-refinery in November 2015.

 

“Biofuels like ethanol are a fast-growing part of the energy sector. Its manufacture can involve potentially dangerous chemical reactions.

 

Workers in biofuel facilities must be properly trained to operate equipment and respond to emergencies,” said Linda Harrington, OSHA’s acting area director in Columbus. “In addition to hazards in the manufacturing process, the storage of corn used in ethanol exposes workers to grain handling hazards like dust ignition and engulfment as workers move corn from storage to the processing area. Employers must protect workers from these hazards during their production processes.”

 

Inspectors found Three Rivers Energy’s ethanol production violated OSHA’s process safety management regulations including failing to:

 

  • Develop written procedures for safely conducting tasks in the process, and for maintaining the ongoing integrity of equipment.
  • Train operators.
  • Correct equipment deficiencies.
  • Establish an incident investigation team and maintain accurate records.
  • Maintain adequate drawings and diagrams of pipes and instruments used in the chemical process.
  • Implement an emergency response plan for the plant and train workers in emergency response procedures.

 

Other violations included failing to:

 

  • Conduct personal protective equipment assessments.
  • Develop procedures and implement permit confined space requirements including testing atmospheric conditions and providing emergency and rescue equipment.
  • Train workers on grain bin safety and rescue operations.
  • Develop a written housekeeping program to remove grain dust and spills from the work area.
  • Install safeguards on machinery and live electrical parts.

 

The company was provided with 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

 

 

 

 

Author Kori Shafer-Stack, Editor, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in post-injury response procedures and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact: kstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

Obesity Is Costing You More Than A Lean Physique

obesity increasing costsIs there a cost to being obese? Experts say, “absolutely.” The costs of obesity can extend beyond personal health. There is a lifelong financial impact, beyond medical bills. There are direct health costs (medical services) and indirect costs: value of lost work, quality of life and insurance – all related to obesity.

 
According to a report from the Department of Health Policy at George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services, the tangible annual health and work-related costs of obesity for a woman amount to $4,789 more than a woman of average weight would pay. For an obese man, those added costs are $2,646 annually.
 

 

Being obese can impact insurance rates, even more so than your age.

 

Prevention is key. Start making choices that will reduce obesity. Get moving and strengthening. Physical activity is one way you can invest in your long-term health. Movement is great for your mind, body and can promote weight loss.

 
Eat less processed foods, and eat less in general. Nourish your body with at least five servings of fruits and veggies daily. Make meal choices to include lean proteins and healthy fats.

 

Enjoy a good night’s sleep, and manage your stress. Lack of sleep and excess stress can sabotage weight loss efforts.

 
Participate in your company’s wellness program. Taking advantage of company wellness perks is a way to be proactive about investing your wellbeing.

 
Seek professional support. If you are not having success with your weight loss efforts, look to a professional for guidance. It does not matter if you have been overweight your entire life, there are changes you can start to make at any age to improve your health.

 

 

Author: Heather Klaus, Medcor, Wellness Program Manager. Heather oversees Medcor’s internal wellness program for nearly 900 associates nationwide.  She also develops and supports wellness programs for Medcor clients.  Heather is a regular author and contributor to health and wellness blogs, videos and newsletters.  Heather holds a Bachelor’s in Science from Northern Illinois University in Nutrition and Dietetics. She is a certified trainer, fitness instructor and Lifestyle and Weight Management Consultant.  http://www.medcor.com.  Contact: heather.klaus@medcor.com

Pay-As-You-Go Solution for Workers’ Comp from The Hanover Lets Insureds Pay Premiums in Real-Time

WORCESTER, Mass., Aug. 19, 2016—The Hanover Insurance Group, Inc. has launched Hanover EZPay, a pay-as-you-go solution for workers’ compensation policies that allows insureds to pay their premiums in real-time, based on payroll, helping independent insurance agents provide better service to their clients.

 

This new payment solution offers businesses the option to pay their premiums as part of their payroll processes, either by self-reporting payroll at the end of each pay period or by linking Hanover EZPay with their payroll company.

 

“Hanover EZPay allows agents to provide their clients with increased flexibility and peace of mind by offering a payment option that fits with the flow of their business,” said John C. Roche, president of commercial lines at The Hanover. “For many agencies, this also helps increase customer satisfaction and retention, making it beneficial for both the agent and the customer.”

 

Business owners can now pay their workers’ compensation insurance premiums as each payroll cycle is processed, helping to improve their businesses’ cash flow and reduce audit exposures with real-time premium calculations. This option also offers businesses automatic premium withdrawals and does not require down payments or monthly billing fees.

 

The introduction of Hanover EZPay is further commitment to The Hanover’s workers’ compensation business, helping to enhance its agents’ ability to provide high-quality, easy-to-use products to their customers. This new payment option is available exclusively for The Hanover’s elite agent partners across the country and cannot be obtained directly through the company.

 

To learn more about The Hanover or Hanover EZPay, please visit hanover.com or hanover.com/billing.

 

ABOUT THE HANOVER


The Hanover Insurance Group, Inc., based in Worcester, Mass., is the holding company for several property and casualty insurance companies, which together constitute one of the largest insurance businesses in the United States. For more than 160 years, The Hanover has provided a wide range of property and casualty products and services to individuals, families, and businesses. The Hanover distributes its products through a select group of independent agents and brokers. Together with its agents, the company offers specialized coverages for small and mid-sized businesses, as well as insurance protection for homes, automobiles, and other personal items. Through its international member company, Chaucer, The Hanover also underwrites business at Lloyd’s of London in several major insurance and reinsurance classes, including marine, property and energy. For more information, please visit hanover.com.

 

CONTACT:


Emily P. Trevallion
etrevallion@hanover.com
508-855-3263

 

Abby M. Clark
abclark@hanover.com
508-855-3549

 

Henry Stimpson, Stimpson Communications, 508-647-0705, Henry@StimpsonCommunications.com

 

All products are underwritten by The Hanover Insurance Company or one of its insurance company subsidiaries or affiliates (“The Hanover”). Coverage may not be available in all jurisdictions and is subject to the company underwriting guidelines and the issued policy. This material is provided for informational purposes only and does not provide any coverage. For more information about The Hanover visit our website atwww.hanover.com.

Opioid Law Provides Limited Relief And Other News Tidbits

OSHA issues final electronic recordkeeping rule for injuries

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued its controversial final rule on Wednesday to expand electronic recordkeeping requirements for workplace injuries and illnesses and make such records publicly available. The new rule, effective Jan. 1, 2017, requires certain employers to electronically submit injury and illness data that they are already required to record on their on-site OSHA

 

 

Gold Justice Partner Ringler Associates Supports Natty Awards

Congratulations to the Trial Lawyers Association of British Columbia which won for Publication of the Year and the New Jersey Association for Justice which won for CLE of the Year. Accepting on behalf of their organizations was Carla Terzariol, Executive Director/CEO, and Cornelius Larkin, Executive Director, respectively. Gold Justice Partner Ringler Associates represented at the meeting by Duke Wolpert sponsored the awards which were beautiful.

 

 

Broadspire(R) Donates $175,000 to Two Not-for-Profits

Broadspire®, a leading global third-party administrator of workers compensation claims, liability claims and medical management services, has donated $100,000 to the SOS Children’s Village – Florida and $75,000 to Moving in the Spirit in Georgia. The funds were raised during the Company’s 2016 Charity Golf Tournament. Read more…

 

 

Opioid law provides limited relief to big problem

A federal law aimed at cutting opioid addiction lacks sufficient funding and scope, but observers say it still could ease a problem that is a major issue for the workers compensation sector. In particular, by increasing education efforts and introducing prescription reporting at the national level, the measure will help employers and insurers curb some abuse of the addictive drugs, they say.

 

 

Guest opinion: ColoradoCare threatens workers’ comp system

I’ve been saying for months, along with other Colorado business leaders, that Amendment 69 is a bad idea. The effort to create a single-payer health-care system, called ColoradoCare, would have a profound and disastrous effect on the state, including my area of concern, workers’ compensation insurance. Read more…

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

California’s DIR/CHSWC Appoint Brady to Commission

California’s Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and the Commission on Health and Safety and Workers Compensation (CHSWC) recently announced the appointment of Martin Brady to the commission, where he has served since 2012.

 
Governor Brown reappointed Brady as the public employer representative.

 

Commissioners are appointed by the Governor and the Legislature.

 

Labor Code 75 establishes that two of the employer members and two of the labor members of the Commission shall be appointed by the Governor for a total of four members.

 

Brady has been executive director at the Schools Insurance Authority since 1997, where he was a risk management and prevention manager from 1988 to 1997.

 

He is a director of the California Association of Joint Powers Authority and the California Coalition on Workers Compensation.

 

This position does not require Senate confirmation.

 

 

 

 

Author Kori Shafer-Stack, Editor, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in post-injury response procedures and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact: kstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

The Smallest Things Make the Biggest Impact In Work Comp Claims Prevention

A majority of work comp claims can be prevented. It would be hard to technically eliminate the total risk of them occurring, but it is possible to decrease the risk.  Oftentimes these are simple safety tasks to implement, not painstaking ones.  Risk managers and safety personnel can sometimes think too much about it, but simplest answer is often the most effective.

 

Slips, trip and fall injuries, and overexertion are responsible for the bulk of claims. Depending on the tasks performed on your work floor, this could be the bulk of a worker’s day from the start of the workweek to the end. 

 

 

Minor Changes Can Significantly Increase Safety

 

Preventing the most common injuries can be as simple as maintaining good housekeeping practices, and a few minor changes can significantly increase safety in the workplace and lower workers’ comp costs.

 

 

6 Tips to Reduce Common Injuries

 

For example, If you live in the Midwest or Northeast, many injuries each year are due to employees slipping on ice and snow.  In addition to that, no matter where you reside, employees can slip on water or grease spills, and also trip over objects, resulting in minor to severe injury.  Here are ways to reduce these risks:

 

  • Fix poor lighting in areas where injuries occur the most.

 

  • Keep floors and stairs clean and free of objects or debris.

 

  • Clean slippery surfaces regularly and make sure machinery is marked off so workers do not get clothing or laces caught up in moving objects.

 

  • Covers hoses and cords or run them out of the path of passing employs in walking areas or work benches.

 

  • Keep aisles clutter free and make sure any spills are promptly cleaned and a product such as Floor-Dry is used to soak up any remaining oils or liquid after a spill.

 

  • Repair uneven surfaces or cracks in your work floor to eliminate tripping or stumbling.

 

 

Overexertion Injuries

 

Overexertion injuries occur mainly due to lifting, pushing and pulling, bending and twisting, repetitive motion, and awkward postures.  Out of those risks, lifting and pushing/pulling tasks will be the cause for the majority of injuries. 

 

To move materials, think about utilizing:

 

  • Conveyers

 

  • Hoists

 

  • Lift-assist devices and equipment designed to reduce material handling and manual lifting.

 

  • Reduce the weight of the materials to be moved or break down pallets into smaller, more manageable loads that are easier on your employees.

 

 

Teach Employees Proper Lifting Techniques

 

Another effective alternative is to invest in teaching employees proper lifting techniques, such as “lifting with the legs and not the back,” or “bending the tool and not the wrist.”  These may seem like no-brainers, but these mottos need to constantly be ingrained in the minds of each employee you have working for you on your work floor.  It really can go a long way in preventing injury. 

 

Even something as simple as implementing a lift-limit, meaning that if material is over a certain weight, a worker has to go get another employee to help.  Install some discipline if a coworker is caught breaking the lifting rules. Even better is implementing a reward system, when another employee is observed helping another employee out.  A $10 gas card mean seem like nothing these days, but everyone loves getting some help at the gas pump, even if it is only $10. 

 

Other common-sense solutions include using handles to lift boxes when they are so equipped, reducing the frequency and distance of lifting and carrying, locating frequently used items as close to the body as possible to minimize reaching, and adding padding to tools that may need it.  These are simple ways that can reduce claims in the long run, and they are simple corrections to longstanding mechanisms of injury.

 

 

Summary

 

These are common sense ways to help reduce risk and injury in the workplace.  Workers face these risks every day, and you could be surprised at what suggestions your coworkers can supply if you ask them.  Reward ideas that you implement, and welcome feedback at any time, not just at the end of the year when you ask your employee.  Sometimes the simplest, most cost-effective answers are right under your nose. 

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Massachusetts Unveils FY 2017 Workplace Safety Application

The Massachusetts Department of Industrial Accident’s Office of Safety recently released the FY17 Workplace Safety Training & Education Grant Program Application for submission by July 1, 2016.

 
The objective of this program is to promote safe and healthy conditions in the workplace by awarding state funds to eligible applicants who submit responses designed to provide and improve safety education and training in Occupational Safety and Health to employers/employees within the Commonwealth covered by the Massachusetts Workers Compensation Law (M.G.L. Chapter 152). Complete instructions will be detailed in the FY17 Safety Training Grant Application.

 

Business owners should prepare and submit their grant application as outlined in the instructions. Incomplete applications cannot be processed unless all requested documents are included.

 

For their convenience, state officials have created the grant application and contractual documents as writable PDF files. The grant application and supporting documents as outlined in the check off summary must be submitted electronically as one document. Multiple attachments and zip files cannot be accepted.

 

Businesses should remember to apply for and submit a copy of their Department of Revenue (DOR) Certificate of Good Standing with their application and contractual documents. A Certificate of Good Standing less than six months old must be provided at the time of submission.

 

The fastest and easiest way to obtain a Certificate is online through MassTaxConnect https://mtc.dor.state.ma.us/mtc Applicants must be in full compliance with all obligations to the Department of Unemployment Assistance, Department of Industrial Accidents, and any other obligations to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

 

Applicants found to be non-compliant will be removed from consideration until all compliance issues have been resolved. Prepare and submit original contractual documents as outlined in the instructions. ALL signatures and dates must be original and in ink. Stamps will not be accepted.

 

If you have questions or need assistance with grant application only, contact Deven Awalt 617-727-4900 ext. 7404 or Maria Pesantes at 617-727-4900 ext. 7376. You may also refer all questions to safety@dia.state.ma.us

 

If you have questions or need assistant with the contractual documents only, contact Diane Lentini at 617-626-5913 or by emailing diane.lentini@massmail.state.ma.us

 

 

 

 

Author Kori Shafer-Stack, Editor, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in post-injury response procedures and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact: kstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

7 Ways to Prevent Slips, Trips, and Falls

wine fallingA common source of accidents in almost any work environment is the slip, trip, and fall. All three types of accidents have the same result where the employee’s feet leave and land on the floor or other surface. Often there is a combination of slip and fall or of trip and fall. The fortunate employee who trips and falls receives a few bruises. The unlucky employee receives one or more fractured bones, torn ligaments, or other soft tissue injury.

 

 

The fact is most slips, trips, and falls can be prevented through a combination of proper risk management by the employer and proper training of the employee on how to avoid accidents.  The employer can reduce or eliminate most of the accidents involving slips, trips and falls by using the following guidelines:

 

 

1) Using the most appropriate flooring materials

 

The flooring material chosen should not be selected based solely on cost or aesthetic issues. The flooring surface should be smooth, but not slippery. There ARE standards for the safest co-efficient of friction on surfaces, so make sure your surfaces meet these standards. It should not have joints, ridges or edges that are one fourth inch in height or greater. Any greater elevation changes than this present the opportunity for tripping. The floor material should be slip-resistant, meaning the material should not accommodate any sliding of the feet. This is especially true in restrooms, kitchen facilities, and at exterior entrances where rain, sleet or snow can be tracked inside the building.

 

 

2) Having the proper floor maintenance

 

Any damage done to the floor surface by the building settling, dropped items, wear and tear, or by movement of supplies or equipment should be promptly repaired. Frayed carpet or missing tile often leads to a slip and fall or a trip and fall. All flooring surfaces should be kept in a state of good repair (and that means no duct tape over a frayed seam as a repair). The uses of floor cleaners and waxes should be in accordance to the product specifications. A slip-resistant floor with an excessive coat of wax will lose it slip-resistant properties.

 

 

3) Having the proper housekeeping rules

 

All materials, supplies, equipment and tools should have their designated locations and the floor is never one of the locations. Litter, debris, and left over production waste should be removed promptly before it can become a slip or trip hazard. Any spills of any type should be immediately cleaned.

 

 

4) Marking and identifying all changes in elevation

 

There are more falls where the change in elevation is one step than there are where the change in elevation is a full set of steps from one floor to another. Whether one step or a dozen steps, the steps need to be properly marked. If the steps have the same color and the same floor covering as the adjacent floor, this is inviting trips and falls. The steps should be clearly marked, well lit, with an even width and height for every step, and be properly maintained. Properly maintained includes no frayed or broken edges, proper handrails, slip-resistant surface and no loose flooring material.

 

 

5) Maintaining the sidewalks and walkways

 

All sidewalks need to be smooth but not slippery.  Any damage to the sidewalk from settling, tree roots, or machinery traversing across the sidewalks should be repaired quickly. Any elevation change of a ¼ inch or higher needs to be clearly marked or corrected. Any accumulation of water from water sprinklers, rain, ice or snow needs to be removed before an accident can occur.

 

 

6) Maintaining parking garages and parking lots

 

A pothole in the parking lot can cause a lot more than a damaged hubcap or messing up the wheel alignment. The surface area of the parking lot or parking garage needs to smooth without ridges, edges or joints greater than ¼ inch to prevent trips and falls. Any potholes, broken pavement of other irregularities should be promptly repaired. Marked walk areas or sidewalks should be provided to reduce the potential for slips and trips. The parking area should be properly illuminated for night or bad weather use. Parking bumpers, speed bumps, and other potential trip hazards should be brightly painted to reduce the risk of trips.

 

 

7) Requiring proper footwear

 

If the employees are to be working in an area where there is occasionally water on the floor, spills or other causes of slippery conditions, the employer should require all employees to wear shoes designed with a skid resistant sole and heel.  A good rule of thumb is low heels and good tread on all work footwear.

 

 

By using good risk management techniques, the potential for slips, trips and falls can be greatly reduced. We recommend these safety tips be included in your safety program.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Australian Construction Company Convicted After Worker Seriously Injured

An Australian construction company was recently convicted and fined $50,000 over an incident in which a concrete truck tipped over and seriously injured a worker after unknowingly setting up on top of a temporarily covered ventilation shaft.

 

Ducon Pty Ltd. was found guilty by the Melbourne Magistrates Court on one charge of breaching the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004 for failing to ensure the workplace was safe. It was also ordered to pay $20,000 in costs.

 
The company was the principal contractor at the construction site of a 36-story apartment block at Hughesdale in Melbourne’s south-east.

 
The court heard that a shaft, which was to be fitted later with a ventilation system for an underground car park, was covered with 100mm of concrete which made it appear like part of a capping beam.

 
A capping beam is a solid concrete structure supported by piles and is commonly used as a place for heavy machinery with outriggers such as cranes and concrete pumping trucks to be set up.

 
The court heard that Ducon Pty Ltd. knew that the shaft had been covered in concrete but failed to mark the location.

 
In April of 2012, the subcontractor engaged to fill columns at the site with concrete was advised by the site foreman to set up their concrete pumping truck on the capping beam.

 
A worker was on a mobile scaffold, holding and directing the concrete pour hose into the columns when an outrigger stabilizing the truck penetrated the 100mm layer of concrete over the shaft. It tipped the truck over, causing the boom to come down and hit the scaffold where the worker was standing.
The worker suffered a fractured spine, crushed right hand, broken right ankle and foot. He also required skin grafting.

 

 

 

 

Author Kori Shafer-Stack, Editor, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in post-injury response procedures and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact: kstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

Professional Development Resource

Learn How to Reduce Workers Comp Costs 20% to 50%"Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%"
Lower your workers compensation expense by using the
guidebook from Advisen and the Workers Comp Resource Center.
Perfect for promotional distribution by brokers and agents!
Learn More

Please don't print this Website

Unnecessary printing not only means unnecessary cost of paper and inks, but also avoidable environmental impact on producing and shipping these supplies. Reducing printing can make a small but a significant impact.

Instead use the PDF download option, provided on the page you tried to print.

Powered by "Unprintable Blog" for Wordpress - www.greencp.de