Communication is Key in Post Injury Procedures

 

Tight Post Injury Procedures Reduce Costs

 

Post injury procedures keep the circle of control between employees, the employer and the doctor. Companies need to have a tight post injury response procedure to keep down workers’ compensation costs. It is important to have a procedure in place to address an injury immediately after and for the first twenty-four to forty-eight hours after the injury. This is because there must be communication between the employee, the doctor and the employer. Nothing can be left to chance.

 

There should be a contained process so that communication with the employee and the doctor moves in a continuous loop. Without this continuity, the employee and the doctor may become fragmented, breaking off from the employer, with the employee remaining out of work as a result. A tightly controlled post-injury response procedure keeps control of the communication process among the three parties: employee, employer and physician. If communication between these parties is in place, it is much more likely that the employee will return to work in a prudent but timely manner.

 

 

Employer’s Communication Most Important

 

The most important part of this procedure is the employer’s communication contact. The employer must have a responsible employee to serve as the primary contact point who is willing to take charge of immediate contacts and keeps this communication loop flowing. Of course, all your employees, managers and supervisors must know the name and phone number of this key contact person. Make sure the key contact’s name and contact information is posted prominently in all policy manuals, workers’ compensation communications and employee bulletin boards.

 

 

Employee Communication

 

Another important part of this procedure is the employee’s willingness to communicate. Employers should cultivate a workplace atmosphere that fosters and expects communication. Employees should be made aware of the fact that they are expected to not only communicate the fact of an injury, but also regularly update the employer about the course of the injury, particularly in its initial stages. Having one key, easy to reach contact person for the employee makes it much easier for an injured employee to keep in touch. Employers should not make injured employees make numerous calls to different departments or people to repeat the same information. It goes without saying that the contact person needs to be patient and kind while an injured employee (or their family member) who may be in pain or shock describes unfamiliar medical procedures, medications and treatment.

 

 

Medical Provider Communication

 

The medical providers are the third important component of this communication loop. Under law, the employee must sign the appropriate releases for the employee’s doctors to provide the employer with confidential medical information. Make sure the employee’s understand the expectation that they will sign these releases and that you all share the same goal of getting the employee well and back to work as soon as possible.

 

 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Employer Silence is Root of Many Workers Comp Problems

 

46% of Workers Incorrectly Think Claims Being Contested
 
Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) has published a most welcome study into the reasons that workers get compensation lawyers. The most disturbing reason, cited by 46% of workers surveyed, was that they thought their claims had been contested, even though the paperwork had just begun and no decisions had yet been made.
 
People working with claims, any kind of claims, understand that there is an initial lag, ranging from days to months, before an administrative agency becomes active on a claim. An insurance company usually, but certainly not always, is quicker to respond, but “quick” might mean weeks, and a family suddenly without a weekly check and little or no savings will be on the verge of panic.
 
 
Lawyer Should Not Be One Communicating with Worker
 
If they consult a lawyer, they will quickly learn that the resolution is inevitably going to take time. But why must they hear that from a lawyer? Every risk manager or human resources chief could tell them that a lot faster (and cheaper!)
 
But there is something else your personnel can tell a worker who has just filed a comp claim – how to receive information and, if necessary, some form of income continuation. (A lawyer could tell them the same, but many don’t and it isn’t nearly as comforting as hearing it from the employer.)
 
The study mentioned another fact. When an employer is small enough to know everyone in the workplace (say 200 employees or so) comp problems grow more slowly than when the employee has no one in charge who knows them. (Julius Caesar was famed as a military leader because he could address all centurions in his army by their names- over 500. If he could do it, with a bit of effort you can do it with 200.)
 
 
It is Your Responsibility
 
Finally, there is the old problem of “falling between two stools”, meaning that there is always help at hand, but everyone assumes that someone else will provide it. Rather than rely on a disastrous assumption, just reach out and communicate. An employer that stays in continuous touch during the month or two following a reported injury will be the first to learn of a problem, and the first to propose a solution. And somewhere, a lawyer won’t get that first phone call.
 
If a worker (and the spouse!) is aware that the employer will nudge a silent bureaucracy with a call, the comp problems will start small and grow smaller.
 
 
Author: Attorney Theodore Ronca is a practicing lawyer from Aquebogue, NY. He is a frequent writer and speaker, and has represented employers in the areas of workers’ compensation, Social Security disability, employee disability plans and subrogation for over 30 years. Attorney Ronca can be reached at 631-722-2100. medsearch7@optonline.net  
 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  
 
©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.
 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Post Injury Procedures: Communication is Key

 

Post injury procedures keep the circle of control between employees, the employer and the doctor. Companies need to have a tight post injury response procedure to keep down workers’ compensation costs. It is important to have a procedure in place to address an injury immediately after and for the first twenty-four to forty-eight hours after the injury. This is because there must be communication between the employee, the doctor and the employer. Nothing can be left to chance.

 

There should be a contained process so that communication with the employee and the doctor moves in a continuous loop. Without this continuity, the employee and the doctor may become fragmented, breaking off from the employer, with the employee remaining out of work as a result. A tightly controlled post-injury response procedure keeps control of the communication process among the three parties: employee, employer and physician. If communication between these parties is in place, it is much more likely that the employee will return to work in a prudent but timely manner.

 

Do you need help developing your post injury processes? We have consulting and training services available to help you at http://reduceyourworkerscomp.com/services/workers-compensation-consulting/#axzz2DKMATXF3. Or, to have a reference guide on hand to consult, see our book at http://reduceyourworkerscomp.com/workers-comp-cost-reduction-guide-book/#axzz2DKMATXF3.

 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Employers Hold The Key to Controlling Workers Comp Claims Costs

 

Employers Are Most Important Piece in Communication
 
Many employers limit their participation in their own work comp claims hoping that the carrier will do nearly all of the work. It seems, to many employers, that it goes with the premium. However, as any trial attorney appreciates, whoever volunteers to become the communications center will control the progress of the claim.
 
Communications in comp claims are quite complex. It is wrongly imagined that the parties (employer and worker) are not allowed to communicate with each other during a claim. This is entirely false and the law requires that each MUST stay in touch with the other. In addition, one or both must often communicate with the carrier, the Work Comp Board, medical providers, health insurance and group disability carriers as well as a variety of agencies.
 
The flow of data among all these will quickly bring a claim to a halt unless properly coordinated. Delay costs money in comp and it’s only the employer who pays.
 
 
Take Control of Costs Through Communication
 
The cheapest and fastest way an employer can prevent unnecessary delay and confusion is to make sure that all other parties are copied on any piece of information the employer receives, from whatever source. Group medical plans are especially concerned that they may be paying unintentionally for a comp claim. Employers will often receive requests for information during a claim. Resist the temptation to refer the requests to someone else or stonewall the situation. By coordinating the requests with other parties you will maintain control and limit misunderstandings, a leading cause of soaring expense and lost time.
 
 
Right to Confidentiality is Waived
 
It is a misconception that medical information is automatically protected by a “right to privacy”. Whenever a claim for disability is made the “right to confidentiality” is waived. (“Right to privacy” does not apply to medical records, although the term is often misapplied to what is “right to confidentiality”)
 
Every year seems to bring new players into the field of employee benefits with ever more exchanges required. Stonewalling will work, for a while, but the bill to be paid in the end will be much higher.
 
 

Author: Attorney Theodore Ronca is a practicing lawyer from Aquebogue, NY. He is a frequent writer and speaker, and has represented employers in the areas of workers’ compensation, Social Security disability, employee disability plans and subrogation for over 30 years. Attorney Ronca can be reached at 631-722-2100. medsearch7@optonline.net

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com


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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Do Your Employees Know Your Safety Plans, Survey Says NO

 

*Gaps Seen in Workers’ Awareness of Company Safety Plans, Preparedness

 

A Staples.com survey of small business managers and office workers on office health and safety showed gaps in office workers’ awareness of companies’ safety plans and preparedness, a situation that could lead to increased accidents and injuries.

 

The survey, conducted in advance of National Safety Month, found that managers were far better informed on workplace safety preparedness than office workers, who were uncertain on what they should do in case of an emergency. [WCx]

 

For example, nearly 70 percent of managers say their company has an emergency communication plan, but nearly half of office workers are either unsure if a plan exists or say their company doesn’t have a plan. In addition, 50 percent of office workers said they participate in safety drills only once every few years or never. Only 19 percent of office workers think their company is prepared for a major medical emergency.

 

According to the survey, managers were almost 50 percent more likely than non-managers to be able to locate their company’s safety-related supplies such as defibrillators, eye wash, dust masks, and caution and wet floor signs.

 

Additional safety findings:

 

— When it comes to fire, more than 70 percent of both managers and office workers felt their company was somewhat or very prepared.

 

— When it comes to flooding only 50 percent of employees felt their company was adequately prepared. This is a particularly concerning statistic because, according to the National Weather Service Forecast Office, flooding causes more damage in the United States than any other severe weather-related event, costing an average of $4.6 billion a year.

 

— While 56 percent of managers said they were either very prepared or somewhat prepared in case of a hazardous material exposure, only 23 percent of office workers said they would know what to do in that circumstance. [WCx].

 

The Staples.com Safety Survey was conducted through a third party research company and had 412 total respondents, (208 office managers and 204 office workers) from small businesses with under 50 employees.

 

 

<pAuthor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

 


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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Employee Communication is Vital to Workers Comp Success

One factor that correlates strongly with the employer’s ability to control workers compensation cost is the ability to communicate effectively with employees.  The importance of quality communications with the employee cannot be overstated. The level and quality of communications will often make a difference in the final outcome of the workers comp claim.
 

 
Communications can be formal and informal. Formal communications include published policies, brochures and posters advising the employee of the work coverage benefits, and written documents / procedures outlining the roles and responsibilities of the employee and other personnel when a workers comp claim occurs. Also, a log where a summary is recorded of each verbal communication with the employee would be classified as formal. (WCxKit)
 
 
The informal level of communication would include both telephone conversations and face-to-face discussions with the employee. Informal communications would also include any voice mail or get well cards sent to the employee.
 
 
Through proper communication with the employees, the employer provides and receives information from the employee.  If the communications become a one-way street with the employee or employer providing all the information, the communications are not effective.  The balance between receiving and providing information should remain roughly equal.
 
 
Communications with the employee should start before there is a workers comp claim. This would be done:

 

By establishing the employee’s responsibility to report an injury accident immediately,
By having safety training sessions,
By establishing procedures the employee is to follow if there is an accident, and,
By communicating the importance of the modified duty program.
 
 
This proactive communication before an accident will pave the way for smoother handling of each claim, if and when one does occur.
 
 
After the injury it is equally important to communicate with the employee.  Contacting the employee immediately after the first medical treatment conveys to the employee a level of caring and concern about their wellbeing.  The employer should remain in contact with the employee throughout the recovery process.  The best way to do this is via a weekly scheduled phone call or having the employee call in after each medical visit.  The information discussed on these calls allows the employer to more easily respond to the injured employee's concerns.  
 
Most employees do not obtain an attorney out of greed or a desire to get something more than they deserve.  Most employees obtain attorneys because the level of communications between the employer and the employee is inadequate, or the level of communications between the adjuster and the employee is inadequate.  When there is an adequate conveyance of information between the employer and the employee, the employee does not see a “need” to get an attorney.
 
 
By keeping the employee thoroughly informed it conveys to the employee that he/she is important to the employer.  This will lead to an increased desire to understand company policies and how the employee can comply with these policies. (WCxKit)
 
 
There are various additional ways an employer can keep good communications with the injured employee throughout the claims process.  To learn more about how you can improve your communications with the employees, please contact us for your copy of 2012 Manage Your Workers Compensation Program, Reduce Cost 20-50%

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Manage Your Workers Compensation: Reduce Costs 20-50% www.WCManual.com. Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Contact Mstack@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com. 

 

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Valuable Techniques to Control Medical Costs

Employers who let the injured employees control their own medical care have higher workers compensation medical costs then the employers who are actively involved in the medical care of the injured workers.  There are numerous techniques an employer can use to properly control and direct the medical care provided to injured employees.

 

The states are about even divided between states where employers select the medical provider(s) and the states where the employee chooses the medical provider. Some states even try to give both the employer and the employee a voice in the selection of the medical providers by the use of doctor panels.  In the states that use a doctor panel, the employer selects a group of doctors, and the employee then selects a doctor from the employer’s group of doctors (panel).

 

The first action an employer should take is to identify the reputable, conservative doctors in their area.  Both the nurse case management team and the defense counsel can provide you with valuable information on which doctors you can trust, and which doctor’s rely on referrals from plaintiff attorneys for their income.  Start with having defense counsel provide you with a list of recommended emergency clinics, general practice doctors and orthopedics, then have the nurse case management team cull the list to remove any doctors that are difficult to get along with and/or keep the employees off longer than necessary.   Defense counsel can also tell you if you are in one of the few states that allow absolutely no input by the employer in the selection of the medical provider.

 

 

There are additional important considerations in determining the doctor that should be considered.  You want the doctor(s) to be and do the following.

  •       responsive to the employee’s medical needs
  •      spend the necessary time with the injured employees
  •         have flexibility in scheduling appointments for the employees
  •      review the job descriptions in order to provide light duty work as soon as feasible
  •      have a professional and pleasant manner

 

Post the list of preferred medical providers on the bulletin board for everyone to see.  (Some states require a particular format or poster design for the posting of workers comp doctors; check the specific state requirements for formatting the list of medical providers).  In the states where the employer has the right to designate the medical provider or is required to post a panel of doctors, the list should be titled “Required Medical Provider(s)”.   In the states where the employee selects the medical provider the list should be title “Recommended Medical Providers”. Some networks have exceptional doctors noted, so if these doctors are available consider including them in the panel.  [WCx]

 

 

Establish rapport and dialogue with the medical providers (they will be glad you do as it makes their jobs easier) before the injuries occur.  The medical providers will remember you, as way too many employers have no interaction at all with them.  The medical providers will understand that you care about the general welfare of the employees and you care about getting the employees back to work.  When you show an interest in the employee’s medical care several positive things occur including.

 

  •      medical reports are provided to you timely
  •      you gain cooperation with the return-to-work program
  •       phone calls are returned
  •      any forms or documents you need completed get done

 

There are many other steps the employer should take to control and direct the medical care of injured workers. The new 2012 edition of Manage Workers Compensation Program, Reduced Costs 20-50% has an entire chapter on directing medical care.  The book includes both Ten Considerations for Your Company Doctor and Eleven Reasons NOT to Select a Doctor.  Please contact us for your copy.

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Manage Your Workers Compensation: Reduce Costs 20-50% www.WCManual.comContact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com

 

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WC GROUP:   www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE:  Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact info@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

The Spouse Might Be the Most Important Partner in NY Workers Comp

“Return to Work” (RTW) will achieve unprecedented attention in the coming year, largely due to a series of recent decisions and an upcoming argument in the state’s highest court, the Court of Appeals. The issue will be defining better the standards for “voluntary withdrawal” from the labor force. Such withdrawals can result in halting of future payments.

 
If an employer makes a job offer a return to work is far more likely to result in success than if a worker tries to find a job. To help employers implement a RTW program, the Board has on its website an outline of an RTW program. One of the sections deals with “partners” in the return to work process. Nine people and entities are listed, but the most important is not present on the list. Who might that be? The SPOUSE!
 
 
In order to appreciate the role and importance of the spouse in managing disability it helps to have been as close to the problem as possible, but with professional expertise. That means being the treating doctor or the lawyer representing the worker. Only in that way are you likely to witness first hand the role that is played by the spouse.
 
 
People who have become cynical and jaded by the administrative handling of comp claims would be surprised to learn that the spouse is the person least likely to favor extended disability, no matter what the final settlement figure might be. The spouse, above all others, knows, and lives with, the consequences of extended absence from work. Even the children, who share the consequences, can only guess at the downside nature of disability though they quickly learn what it is like to have an additional parent commenting on their every move.
 
 
Why would the Board outline omit all references to a spouse? Perhaps because the very nature of the relationship is private and beyond the Board’s comment or control. But that is no reason for others to fail to involve that most important person.
 
 
In any enlightened RTW program by the employer a face to face discussion with the employee should be had as quickly as possible. The spouse should be present and participating in the discussion with, of course, the permission of the worker.
 
 
There is a good chance that the employer already knows the spouse, which makes the efforts far more effective. Leaving the efforts to a carrier or administrative board makes for a poor communication network which usually omits family members from the process. But the employer has an excellent functioning, and supportive, network when the family is directly involved.
 
 
A RTW discussion should not focus on the claim. The effort is part of the employer/employee relationship and such discussions can, and often are, had even in the absence of any kind of claim. Having such discussions when no claim has been filed will often result in lowering claims in the future. (Many disability claims – comp, LTD, Social Security disability – are triggered by uncertainty about future earnings or medical payments. A sooner, rather than later, meeting with the employer will greatly reduce that uncertainty.)
 
In short, the employer participates not as a surrogate for the carrier but as the other major player in the family’s security. (WCxKit)
 
 
The first rule of disaster management and control is to maximize the immediate use of all available tools. Do not wait for a third-party to appear with another tool, which is seldom as effective as those already in place and not nearly as timely.
 
Author: Attorney Theodore Ronca is a practicing lawyer from Aquebogue, NY. He is a frequent writer and speaker, and has represented employers in the areas of workers’ compensation, Social Security disability, employee disability plans and subrogation for over 30 years. Attorney Ronca can be reached at 631-722-2100. medsearch7@optonline.net

One of our readers, Tom Gassaway of Arthur J. Gallagher, found this article of particular interest and offered this example. 

I received your newsletter this morning and found one article that I felt was long overdue.  The article was “The Spouse Might Be the most Important Partner in NY Workers Comp.”  I spent 17 years working at Liberty Mutual and remember hearing this mentioned, for the very severe cases, as far back as 1978.  I was told they need to be involved in the psychological and emotional recovery from an accident, no matter in what state the accident occurred.  I even saw it used for a claim involving one of my insureds.

 

The claim involved a worker who lost both hands in a punch press accident.  He was due to be married within a few months of the accident and the obvious questions arose:

Would the wedding even take place?

Would the future spouse still want him?

Would the future spouse be able to assist with all of his needs?

What about income and medical bills?

 

Liberty immediately got him to their rehabilitation center in Boston and started to work on this whole process.  Somewhere along the way the fiancé was asked to take part.  The good news was she was agreeable and it went well.  She was there through the fitting of the “hooks” for hands and other key milestones.  The good news was they were able to be married on time and the they returned to Boston after the wedding to finish the rehabilitation.  Overall, it was a good outcome and I heard later they even had two children. 

Thanks for the article.

WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT GUIDEBOOK:  www.WCManual.com
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Tips for Designing and Writing Your Workers Compensation Brochure

 You've arrived at the spot in your workers’ compensation program where it is a good idea to have a brochure as a communication tool. Congratulations!
 
Keep the design and writing of your brochure very simple. Remember, all you want to do is provide your employees with a summary of the most important workers’ comp management policies developed by the company, to ensure everyone understands these policies. Before you start, make sure you message is clear. The best way to do this is to write it down. Your message should contain a statement of the "importance of your employees."
 
What Does a Good WC Brochure Contain? What size font should be used?
 
Use 8.5 x 11 paper, folded in thirds, giving you a total of six sections – three on each side of a single sheet of paper. Don't just throw words on a piece of paper – it takes a little more planning than that.
 
Understand Grade Level
Space is at a premium, so you must be clear and direct. Avoid wordiness or pompous phrasing or vocabulary. Actually, gearing your message to the sixth grade is just about right. The average person reads at 9th grade level. The "Flesch-Kincaid" grade level index is on some versions of Microsoft Word. Grade level is calculated based on a formula of average sentence length, average size of the word, average syllables minus pronouns and additional points for hard words.

Six key details to master:

1- Use font size 10, 11 or 12 and the spacing between the lines (called the "leading"),
2- The leading should be 120% of font size. 
3- Use 7-12 words per line; this length sentence helps readers scan within their field of view.
4-Use upper and lower case, never use all upper case because it is very difficult to read. People often read the "coastline" of a sentence rather than actually reading the words themselves, and with caps they can not do that.
5- Use unjustified right margins (called ragged right).
6- Use sufficient white space so the piece is pleasing to the eye.
 
Your brochure sections might look like this and contain similar information:
 
This is the OUTSIDE  of your brochure.  
1st Third Section Outside
 
Frequently Asked Questions
 
 
2nd Third Section Outside
 
 
List Contact Information Here
 
3rd Third Section Outside
 
Your Company Logo Here
Your Mission Statement
And
Other Company Information
 
 
This is the INSIDE of your brochure.
1st Third Section Inside
 
Description of Workers’ Compensation
And
Who Is Covered?
 
2nd Third Section Inside
 
Post Injury Response Procedure
List the Steps
 
If you are injured on the job:
Report the injury to your supervisor.
Seek medical treatment.
Etc.
3rd Third Section Inside
 
How Treating Physician is Selected.
Does the employee have a choice?
When the employer may select the treating physician.
Who Pays the Bills?
What is the Process?
 
Every company has a unique style and culture. If you match your communication style to your culture, than your employees will not only  understand all about the company’s workers’ compensation policies and what to do if they are injured on the job, but will willingly buy into the process – making everyone happy. (workersxzcompxzkit)

Rebecca Shafer, J.D., Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers' Compensation costs, including airlines, health care, manufacturing, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. She can be contacted at: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers' comp issues.
 
©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

What is the Biggest Workers Comp Mistake Employers Make with Injured Employees

The biggest mistake  employers make is letting injured employees languish at home

Make sure you keep the lines of communication open from Day One.

  Employees must  know if they are injured  "return-to-work is the name of the game."  Establish your expectations BEFORE injuries occur.  A good time to communicate this message is in your employee orientation at time of hire.  Your message is, "employees are expected to meet weekly and return-to-work in modified duty" as soon as treating physicians give the go-ahead. 

In this way,  employees won't have the chance to think about turning away from work and languishing at home watching the soaps.  It simply won't be a possibility. 

5 Useful Tips to Return Your Injured Workers to Work

1.  Accompany  the injured employee to the medical treatment facility. 

2.  Make sure  the treating physician faxes the workability form back to you.

3.  Call the  employee on the first day of injury and make kindly inquiries.  Be genuinely concerned about the worker's well being.

4.  Send a  get well card – if you can, get it signed by everyone in the employee's immediate surroundings.  Have employees add notes of good will and friendliness.  This has a powerful impact – reminding injured employees, that, yes, they are cared about and a valuable asset to their workplace. This gesture definitely reinforces those ties.

5.  Schedule  weekly meetings, and to the extent possible, have them onsite so the employee remembers the feel of the workplace.  Ensure some work friends drop in to say, "Hi!"  (workersxzcompxzkit)

Remember,  if you're not taking charge of communication, someone else will.  Injured employees start thinking about attorneys and before you know it you are locked in a lawsuit.  You lose both money and a valued employee. Make sure you're the one communicating with injured employees.

"FRAUD PREVENTION" PODCAST click here: http://www.workerscompkit.com/gallagher/mp3 By: Private investigator with 25 years experience.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker about workers' comp issues.

©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

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