Ten Light Duty Work Ideas

Ten Light Duty Work IdeasSo you have decided to provide some light duty or transitional work for injured workers to decrease wage loss expense.  First of all, congratulations! This is the first step in decreasing claims costs. The wage expense in a comp claim is most usually the biggest cost, and any chance you have of decreasing that cost should be taken.  But what should the workers do?  What if they do not follow the rules and get hurt again? What if this light duty work hinders the rehab and recovery?

 

 

These are all common issues and concerns. But there are ways to work around them with jobs that already in the workplace for these workers to do.  Jobs that are no more or less strenuous than anything else they do on a daily basis while out of work.  If stumped for ideas as to where to start, use this information, and then further customize your jobs based on the building blocks we list below.  These will not apply to all areas of every employer, but at least it offers possible job ideas.

 

 

  1. Janitorial tasks

 

Although not glamorous, janitorial tasks are a much-needed function of the workplace. A broom is not heavy so sweeping the floor and back storage areas are not only sanitary but can also reduce risks for slips and falls due to debris. Maybe wiping down machines and making sure they are in proper working order is a job the injured party can do based on their level of experience.  With winter looming, salting entryways and making sure rugs and mats are in good shape and in good working order is a must to prevent falls.  Mopping could also be done, but it can involve lifting and twisting with a wet, heavy mop, so make sure your worker is capable of that before you assign that task to them. The goal is to have them working with light materials and prevent exertion that can cause further injury.

 

 

  1. Maintenance tasks

 

There may be a lot of jobs around the shop that are not done on a regular basis. Oiling machinery will increase the performance of the machine, as will changing belts, cleaning guards, checking saw blades, or cutting surfaces.

 

 

The tasks are not limited to only machinery.  Light painting can freshen and improve the look of the work floor. Replacing broken faucets, light bulbs, cracked mirrors, or repairing/caulking windows that may be not closing properly can also help. Checking outlets for proper power wattage is another one.  Go out on the floor and ask workers what needs to be done or what is not working properly and make the injured worker a “to-do” list.  There may not be enough work for them to last weeks, but at least it gets them back to work and doing something while in recovery mode.

 

 

  1. Office tasks

 

These jobs can include answering the phone, taking sales orders from clients, copying materials for files, or scanning paperwork for example.  Ask the office staff about any upcoming projects and what needs to be done they have been putting off for a while.  Chances are there are some sedentary work tasks available and needed, and this is a perfect task for your injured worker to do.  That way a fully functional worker without work restrictions can focus on more important tasks, or jobs that are more strenuous in nature.

 

 

  1. Inventory

 

A lot of employers carry a certain level of inventory for workplace needs. Obviously, the amount of inventory being carried depends on the type of workplace. But if you have the need, this is another light task the injured worker can do. Taking proper inventory and ordering more supplies is also another task to cross off your own to-do list.  Have the injured worker tally up what is currently in stock, what needs to be ordered, and when it should arrive before supply runs low. This is also a good time to have the worker shop and price supplies.  You might be able to find another vendor that can provide a better supply for a lower price.  This way not only gets the injured worker back to work, but the employee is also saving you money in the long-term.

 

 

  1. Job supervision and reporting

 

If the injured worker is unable to do the normal job, maybe the employee can still go out on job sites and help the other workers.  Not only supervise the overall job, but the worker could also assist in gathering light materials needed for the job.  If the work involves ladders and scaffolding, have someone on the ground to help the other workers, so they do not have to go up and down the ladders repeatedly to fetch materials or tools.

 

 

The injured worker also can report back like how the job is going so far, and recommend any changes or needed materials for the job site.  This will keep the job running on time for completion, and it is just another task that nobody thinks of until the issue arises.  You stay on top of the job status, and if certain recommendations are suggested and implemented, maybe that job is completed sooner than expected, resulting in a happier client.

 

 

  1. Performance reviews

 

If there is a management member out of work due to a claim, maybe now is a good time to bring them in to do annual performance reviews.  This way they can pull all the personnel files on the workforce, review them, get updated feedback from other supervisors on what the current performance is like, and then sit down with the employee to conduct a review and suggest improvements.  Again this may not supply the injured workers with weeks and weeks of work, but at least it is something that needed to be done. And if you have the right candidate to do it then it makes sense to have that person complete the task.

 

 

  1. Security

 

A lot of larger employers, such as grocery stores and retail businesses, have in-house surveillance cameras. The injured worker can monitor the day to day surveillance, clean up messes or spills, rotate product, place shelf signs, or any other light task that may need to be done.  Theft prevention can also be addressed; however, you do not want the injured worker trying to apprehend anyone and get injured again.

 

 

  1. Accounts payable/receivable

 

Another sedentary job is shifting the injured worker over to helping with accounts receivable/payable.  Your business probably has vendors to pay, and you also may have clients that have outstanding invoices.  Have the worker take over the books, and see if they can collect payment on some of the invoices that have not been paid.  Sometimes a faxed invoice to a client followed up by a phone call is all it takes to get the invoice paid.  This task will clean the books up, and make the company current with payments that are coming in and going out all the time.

 

 

  1. Assign a helper

 

If the injured party has restrictions but can still do most of the job, assign an entry-level helper to go along and do the tasks that they cannot do.  This provides the newer employee  a chance to learn more about the business and job duties, and it allows the injured worker to keep doing the normal job, now with the assistance of a helper

 

 

  1. Reach out to the injured party for ideas

 

When you just cannot think of anything for the injured worker to do, reach out to them and see what ideas the employee has.  The incentive for the worker is the chance to return to work, and maybe make the normal pay instead of collecting reduced wages on workers comp.  Sometimes great ideas are suggested. So keep an open mind, solicit some ideas from them, and try to do what you can to implement those job ideas.

 

 

Summary

 

Trying to create jobs for injured workers can be a difficult task.  But with an open mind and some creativity, get injured workers back to work.  Not only does this cut down on the workers’ comp expense but it also can complete some overdue tasks.  Put some thought into it, and ask others around the workplace for ideas.  Together you should be able to come up with a list of tasks that need to be done.  Every dollar saved on wage loss will count in the end.  Keep track of the cost of having these workers come back to light duty work, and weigh it against the cost of keeping them out of work, only returning at full duty.  You will be surprised at the cost savings of implementing a light duty work program.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the co-author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:.

Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Why and How Good Job Descriptions Help Reduce Workers’ Compensation Costs

digital job descriptionA good job description is like money in the pocket for workers’ compensation payers. The more specific the information is available, the better the chances of returning an injured employee to work that much sooner. A well written, appropriately available job description is invaluable for any organization that ever has an injured worker.

 

 

Job Descriptions

 

Surprisingly, many organizations have either poorly written or no job descriptions at all. The vast majority are vague and don’t provide nearly enough information on which to make decisions about whether an injured worker can physically handle a particular job. It is not uncommon to see a company with multiple locations have different job descriptions for the same jobs at each location.

 

Medical directors for third-party administrators cite the lack of adequate — or any — job descriptions as one of their major hurdles in getting injured workers back on the job.

 

Some job descriptions include the 5 strength categories outlined by the Department of Labor:

 

  1. Sedentary
  2. Light
  3. Medium
  4. Heavy
  5. Very heavy

 

This, at least, gives the treating physician an idea of how much weight and effort is needed to do the job. But it fails to take in many other factors that can be crucial to fitting an injured worker in the right position.

 

For example:

 

  • Does the job require the worker to bend, kneel, reach – and how high?
  • Are long periods of standing necessary?
  • Is driving a requirement?
  • Would climbing be important, such as climbing onto equipment?
  • Is pushing and/or pulling involved?
  • Are specific body parts more taxed than others, and to what degree?
  • What cognitive skills are needed?

 

The more detailed, accurate information provided in the job description, the easier it is for physicians to determine if an injured worker can handle the job and what, if any accommodations could enable him to return to work.

 

In addition, a good job description (profile) reduces the number of injuries at an employer by identifying injury risks and preventive ergonomic modifications.

 

 

Disability Duration

 

Getting injured workers back on the job in some capacity saves costs for the employer/payer, who no longer has to pay workers’ compensation benefits. But it also saves the employer/payer additional, though overlooked costs; that is, preventing an injury from becoming one of the small percentages of claims that consume the majority of costs.

 

Estimates are that somewhere between 5 – 10% of claims comprise 80% of workers’ compensation costs. While some of these involve catastrophic injuries, many are seemingly small claims that stay on the books for months or years, often involving multiple medical treatments and medications. That is the impact of disability duration on utilization.

 

Additionally, the longer a person is out of work and the more treatments/medications he receives, the more likely he is to continue in that vicious cycle. He develops a disability mindset and believes he truly needs whatever medical services are suggested.

 

Physicians cannot take all the blame for these claims. If employers/payers cannot provide accurate job descriptions that include specific job demands, and if they are unwilling to make accommodations, the doctor can only do what he is trained to do; help the injured worker resolve his injuries and pain.

 

In addition to providing accurate job descriptions, it is also incumbent on employers/payers to work with treating physicians to help them understand the benefits of returning an injured worker to some sort of work — for the injured worker as well as the employer/payer.

 

 

Get Help Creating Accurate and Comprehensive Job Descriptions

 

The creation of accurate and comprehensive job descriptions is often outside of an employer’s capability.  Technology is advancing in a way that makes the creation of this important information easy.

 

 

 

ODG, one the leading providers of evidence based medicine guidelines has recently incorporated a unique new product option, the ODG Job Profiler.

 

The ODG Job Profiler is an innovative software platform powered by MyAbilities™ which adds job demand data across every industry and occupation by providing a comprehensive database of physical, cognitive, and environmental demands specific to over 30,000 jobs spanning nearly every industry. This solution helps insurers, third-party administrators (TPAs), and employers identify and mitigate the risk of injury by creating a customized Physical Demands Analysis (PDA) for each job function, adjusting disability duration guidelines according to job demands.

 

This information is then packaged as an online digital job profile and becomes shareable to all stakeholders in a claim, streamlining the RTW process and allowing for automated job matching between the individual’s capabilities and available jobs.

 

 

Suggested Actions

 

Shortening up disability durations is key to reducing workers’ compensation costs. Organizations can achieve this by:

 

  1. Getting accurate, detailed job descriptions. Get help directly from an outside service provider, or work with a with a TPA or insurer that can provide access to better physical demands descriptions for various occupations, especially if the provider is using a national database.

 

  1. Taking videos of employees doing their jobs. This can become part of a job description. It can also be used to show the treating physician exactly what a job entails, which will help make more informed decisions about getting the worker back to the right work and seeing if accommodations would help.

 

  1. Partnering with the treating physician. The doctor treating the injured worker should be part of the caregiving team. The physician is a vital part of the RTW process since she has the authority to release the employee to work and the type of position he can do.

 

  1. Providing training to avoid reinjury. Based on the job demands and the worker’s condition, some training may help ensure the employee is doing tasks properly.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Helping injured workers recover and return to productivity should not be left to chance. By having a strategic plan of partnering with physicians, TPAs, insurers and others involved in a claim, and providing as much detailed information as possible — especially job descriptions — organizations can prevent routine claims from becoming expensive, long-lasting ventures.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Don’t Make Two Mistakes In A Row in Workers’ Comp Return to Work

 

 

workers compensation return to work

An object in motion will stay in motion unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. That’s Newton’s first law of motion. “Don’t make two mistakes in a row,” a quote by Beverly Buffini, from one of the podcasts I listen to called The Brian Buffini Show.

 

Hello, my name is Michael Stack. I’m the CEO of Amaxx and those two exact opposite statements and concepts are both vitally important for you to understand personally as the leader of your work comp program or as the educator of your clients, as well as for your injured employees themselves in the success of your program.

 

 

Newton’s Law of Motion in Workers’ Compensation

 

What I want to do today is break down those two concepts, what they are and how they work together to drive your program and yourself to greater success. Let’s first talk about this law of motion and kind of what it means. We all kind of know that, right? You’re kind of going in a certain direction and you just kind of keep going in that certain direction unless you don’t, unless you stop, unless there’s some reason for you to change course.

 

Same is very much true in work comp. Let’s take a look at these return to work rates and this comes from a Washington State L & I study published in the IAIABC return to work paper that they published several years ago. This is a probability that your injured worker is going to return to work ever, probability that they ever return to work at all. Here’s the numbers and you can see how dramatically they start to drop off, 92.8% probability they return to work in some capacity in their lifetime if they’re back to work in less than 12 weeks. Pretty high likelihood that they’re going to be back to work if they get back to work pretty quickly.

 

After 12 weeks, this drops off a cliff, 55.4% of people ever return to work if they haven’t been back to work in 12 weeks. Critical concepts to now start to understand. This ball is in motion, this ball is in motion, this ball is in motion, this ball is in motion, and then after 104 weeks, less than 5% chance they ever return to work at all if they’ve been out of work for that entire time. The ball is in motion. It’s an important thing to critically understand that if you don’t change it for some reason, intervene before here, get those numbers up here, your employee is going to be likely out of work forever, causing permanent and lasting damage to their entire life, as well as making that claim very expensive.

 

 

Don’t Make Two Mistakes In A Row

 

This other concept I heard on this podcast, The Brian Buffini Show. I’ve been following Brian Buffini for 15 plus years. Great lessons, great information as far as business success, personal success, living a balanced life. Check it out if you are interested in that type of thing. But listening to this concept when they’re talking about teaching volleyball. His wife Beverly was a Olympic volleyball player and they’re teaching their daughters about how to be successful in volleyball. This concept which resonated with me, resonated with my wife, is just don’t make two mistakes in a row. Everyone’s going to make mistakes, you’re going to miss the ball, you’re going to drop the ball in some capacity in our lifetimes, but if you don’t make two in a row, you now start to avoid this ball going downhill in all phases of your life, personally as well as your work comp program.

 

If you can understand those two concepts, that the ball is going to stay in motion and if you make a mistake, if something goes wrong, if things are starting to go off the tracks, they’re going to continue to go off the tracks unless you do something about it, unless you’re intentional about it, unless you’re aware that if you’re making that mistake, oh okay, let’s not make two in a row. Or you have a bad part of your day, let’s not have that continue and ruin my entire day or my entire week or my entire month or my entire year in this capacity.

 

Two important concepts to understand, that things are going to stay in motion and if they’re going positively you want that to continue. If you make that mistake, you need to intervene and get things going on the right track.

 

Again, my name is Michael Stack. I’m the CEO of Amaxx and remember your work today in workers’ compensation can make a dramatic impact on your company’s bottom line, but it will make a dramatic impact on someone’s life. Be great.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

ACOEM 3-Part Return to Work Framework



ACOEM Whitepaper: Preventing Needless Work Disability by Helping People Stay Employed


Hey, there. Michael Stack here, CEO of Amaxx. One of the most fundamental goals in workers’ compensation is to return our injured employees to work and back to function. I want to draw your attention to a white paper written by ACOEM several years ago entitled Preventing Needless Work Disability. You could find a link to that white paper below. Within that paper, they talk about a three-part framework or a three-step framework to consider return to work on nearly every single workers’ comp claim. I want to walk you through what that framework is when you’re considering return to work for your injured employees.


ACOEM 3-Part Return to Work Framework


The first part is to assess where that current employee is. The next piece is compare. Then, the final piece is to create. So assess, compare, and create. Assess where they currently are. What are their current job restrictions? What restrictions do they get from the physician that say they could only lift 20 pounds or 50 pounds and they can bend this way or stretch this way X amount of times standing, whatever that happens to be? Where do they currently stand? Compare that what the job descriptions are, the physical demands of their actual jobs. You should have a very comprehensive library of what this means at your organization so you can compare one with two. It’s very, very simple when you actually break it down.


Simplicity of High-Level Understanding


Then, the final piece is to create that job. What are those action steps, then, to now put this into practice? Obviously, there’s a lot more depths to each one of these steps. But if you can understand the high level of what it is that we’re actually trying to accomplish, it can ultimately be fairly simple in your mind to now put this all together. So assess, compare, and create. Three steps in the return to work framework in ACOEM’s Preventing Needless Work Disability white paper, which I highly recommend downloading and checking out. It’s a great resource. Again, my name is Michael Stack, CEO of Amaxx. Remember, your work today on workers’ compensation can have a dramatic impact on your company bottom line. But it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life. So be great.



Michael Stack - Amaxx

Author Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder &lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under InternationalCopyright Law.

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Digital Job Profile Technology and Your Workforce

digital job profileCompanies are using advanced technologies to manufacture their products, create intellectual property, and deliver their varied services. But are they making use of new technologies to optimally manage their own workforce? In the majority of cases, the answer is No.

 

Most of the tools and processes being used to assess job demands, hire capable workers, prevent injuries, manage recovery, and return to work, have not kept up with available software and methodologies.  These new advancements can substantially enhance the health, safety, and productivity of a company’s greatest resource – its employees.

 

Let’s review some of these options with which employers and brokers should become familiar.

 

 

Technology for Physical Demands & Ergonomic Risks

 

Do employers really understand the physical demands of each of their company’s jobs, as well as the ergonomic risks that each job may present?  Traditional job descriptions do the former poorly, and the latter not at all. With the use of today’s technology, a company risk manager can potentially access comprehensive, quantified digital job profiles for virtually every position in their organization, either “off the shelf” or customized with a few modifications. Additionally, they can use a smartphone to capture an employee performing his/her job and upload it into artificial intelligence-powered software that automatically produces a video digital job profile displaying the job in action with quantified physical demands.

 

 

Value of Digital Job Profile

 

Using today’s technologies, an employer can cost-effectively build a digital database of all their company’s jobs which can be used to create precise protocols for post-offer employment testing.

 

Benefits include:

 

  • flag high-demand jobs, ranking the body regions most susceptible to injury, leading to prompt ergonomic mitigation.
  • suggest training programs to build and maintain endurance, specifically tailored to the demands of each job.
  • facilitate return to work based on digitally matching the employee’s clinical status during, and at the end of rehabilitation, to his/her own job or other company jobs in the database, consistent with any physical restrictions or limitations.
  • decrease an employer’s risk exposure for ADA non-compliance.

 

The technology of this type is not confined to industrial applications but is also available for office workers. Office worker technology can provide computerized video-guidance allowing the employee to assess their workspaces (computer, monitor, keyboard, chair, etc.), generate instant ergonomic modifications, and if necessary, recommendations for the purchase of more suitable equipment. This feedback and information support productivity, comfort, and a reduced risk of work-related conditions.

 

 

Share Digital Job Profile with Stakeholders

 

Last, but not least, if and when an injury occurs, the digital job profile is electronically shareable with the employer’s insurer, TPA, or managed care organization (or for self-administration) and provides a roadmap for claim and medical managers to make informed compensability determinations and pursue evidence-based treatment and return-to-work strategies. But more about that in a future installment.

 

Employers, and brokers are well-advised to explore these novel approaches which modernize our approach to workforce management.

 

 

 

Jacob Lazarovic MD, Medical Advisor at Amaxx LLC, has considerable experience in managed care, including 18 years as chief medical officer at Broadspire , a leading TPA. His department produced clinical guidelines and criteria to support sound medical claim and case management practices; participated in analysis, reporting and benchmarking of outcomes and quality improvement initiatives; and operated a comprehensive in-house physician review (peer review) service. He has been published extensively in industry journals and has held several senior medical management positions at companies including HealthAmerica, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida and Vivra Specialty Partners. In his current capacity as CMO at MyAbilities Technologies, he has developed evidence-based online clinical applications that support the company’s digital job profile software, and its claim and medical management tools geared to functionality-driven return to work and job-mat

 

How Long Will My Injured Employee Be Off Work?


 

… We look at the work comp industry. What are the common questions that employers will ask when an employee is injured is how long is my employee going to be out. What is my expectation for how long they should be out, and then two, how do I know when they’ve started to go off the tracks?

 

 

Evidence-Based Medicine Injury Duration Guidelines

 

Today I want to introduce you or possibly re-introduce you to evidence-based medicine injury duration guidelines. There are two primary providers of this information in our industry. MD Guidelines and ODG Guidelines. Both credible sources of information and data that you can reference.

 

I want to walk you through an example here on the board. We’re going to talk about John who works in your warehouse. John’s job or part of John’s job is to lift 50 lb boxes, and he sustained a partial rotator cuff tear injury, which is the data that you see here on the board and this is provided by MD Guidelines.

 

Over here you can see the physical demands or the types of jobs from sedentary to medium to very heavy and heavy jobs. This is the expectation for recovery minimum, optimum, and maximum expected recovery time based on physician consensus of required physiological healing time. This is how long the body should heal based on this type of injury.

 

 

Example: Heavy Physical Demand Warehouse Position

 

Let’s take a look at this. Now, John’s 50 lb box lifting job would fall into this heavy category. You can see here that the optimum recovery time is 42 days. So even if I have no medical background or any medical training and you don’t have any medical background or any training in the medical field, you can look up this information and know very quickly it’s about six weeks that I can expect optimally that John should be back to his job. And it could be up to 85 days and it could be as low as just a couple of weeks here that he could be back to work, obviously based on a number of factors.

 

But this now starts to set your initial expectation just like that Google Maps app going somewhere you’ve never been, dealing with an injury maybe you’ve never dealt with before.

 

Now you also need to know when you’re starting to go off the tracks and so you look at John’s recovery time and now it’s clicking away and now you’re getting over here and you’re like, “Hey, what’s going on over here? Why is John not even close to recovering when the expectation should be that, optimally, you know, just within a couple of six weeks, you know, three, four, five, six weeks, he could potentially be back to work.” So what’s going on here? I’m off the tracks. My ETA has now gotten much higher than it was before. So it gives you that indication of when you’re off the tracks and potentially you need to work with your adjuster, work with your claims handling team, to bring in some other interventions to get back on the track and going in the right direction. Hugely valuable information to tap into and leverage to give you that information to make those appropriate decisions.

 

 

Common Mistake Employers Make with Injury Duration Guidelines

 

One last quick point I want to make here because I often see employers misinterpreting these numbers. Go back to this example of John. You say he’s going to be out six weeks. I’m not even going to think about bringing him back to work or expect he’s going to be back to work until this timeframe because that’s what the injury duration guidelines say.

 

I want to draw your attention up to here though. This is what transitional duty is all about. This is what late duty is all about. Sedentary and light jobs you should be able to get John back to work lickety-split within a couple of days even at the maximum required is four days. So within a couple of days, John should be back to work doing sedentary or light duty in a transitional duty type capacity.

 

When you do that, you’re going to angle John’s recovery time this way. When you leave John out of work and you don’t bring him back up here, you’re going to angle him this way and you’re going to probably end up being even further than maximum. When you get those people back to work right away you’re going to improve their recovery times. When you don’t, you’re going to make sure that recovery time is significantly longer, which as we know, anytime you see that ETA go up significantly higher when you’re driving, it’s not something you’re looking for and particularly in Workers’ Compensation. The impact of that is much greater. It impacts an individual’s life; it adds significant cost to your claim.

 

Again, I’m Michael Stack, CEO of Amaxx. Remember your work today and Workers’ Compensation, it can have a dramatic impact on your company’s bottom line. But it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life.

 

So be great.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Crawford Offers Streamlined Ergonomic and Return to Work Efforts with Innovative Software

TORONTOOct. 9, 2018 /CNW/ – Crawford & Company (Canada) Inc. today announces the integration of Crawford EmployerWORKS™ software with its human risk service line. Crawford EmployerWORKS is an innovative software platform powered by MyAbilities™. It was designed to streamline and standardize the collection, communication, and analysis of physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands tied to risk assessment and return to work efforts. As a tool for the adjudicators, case managers and workers’ compensation consultants of Crawford’s Human Risk division, Crawford EmployerWORKS further empowers our professionals to effectively and efficiently handle disability claims by ensuring a prompt and successful return to work and implementing proper measures to prevent workplace injuries.

 

 

“Specializing in occupational (workers’ compensation) and non-occupational (leave and disability) claims from a claim and case management perspective, our human risk division strives to identify and implement new, effective methods to manage such claims ensuring a safe, timely and sustainable return to work,” said Heather Matthews, senior vice president, Crawford Human Risk. “Crawford EmployerWORKS serves to simplify and enhance our communication capabilities with clients, reduce claim costs, and increase success rates tied to sustainable return to work solutions.”

 

Click HERE to access EmployerWORKS’ capabilities.

 

This analytical system leverages the vast Crawford EmployerWORKS database to identify typical job demands linked to specific job profiles while incorporating risk factors to assist in mapping out a sustainable return to work solution. Crawford EmployerWORKS also includes tools to identify barriers for return to work in the form of physician causation analysis and psychosocial factors.

 

“We believe that everyone – employees, employers, health practitioners and insurance companies – will benefit from better prevention, injury management and return to work solutions through advanced ergonomics, artificial intelligence and digital risk assessment technology,” said Reed Hanoun, CEO of MyAbilities. “The EmployerWORKS suite is a whole new take on human asset management. We truly believe that we will revolutionize the way industries manage their ergonomics and safety strategies and that they will never look back!”

 

Through the use of innovative technology, Crawford continues to adhere to its mission to restore and enhance lives, business and communities by leveraging the appropriate expertise and analytical tools to identify and remove barriers hindering injured parties from obtaining gainful and meaningful employment following an accident, injury or illness.

 

 

About Crawford®


Based in Atlanta, Crawford & Company (NYSE: CRD-A and CRD-B) is the world’s largest publicly listed independent provider of claims management solutions to insurance companies and self-insured entities with an expansive global network serving clients in more than 70 countries. The Company’s two classes of stock are substantially identical, except with respect to voting rights and the Company’s ability to pay greater cash dividends on the non-voting Class A Common Stock (CRD-A) than on the voting Class B Common Stock (CRD-B), subject to certain limitations. In addition, with respect to mergers or similar transactions, holders of CRD-A must receive the same type and amount of consideration as holders of CRD-B, unless different consideration is approved by the holders of 75% of CRD-A, voting as a class. More information is available at www.crawfordandcompany.com.

 

 

About MyAbilities


MyAbilities is an Ontario-based healthcare data analytics company, focused on process automation for workplace safety, ergonomics and injury management. With its AI data-driven Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) offering, we help employers, insurance companies, healthcare providers and injured workers by preventing workplace injuries, expediting the return to work of injured workers, and reducing the cost of claims while promoting a healthy and fit workforce. More information is available at http://www.myabilities.com.

 

SOURCE Crawford & Company (Canada) Inc.

 

For further information: For more information, contact: Heather Matthews, Senior Vice President, Human Risk, Crawford & Company (Canada) Inc., Tel: 519.578.5540 Ext. 2672, Email: Heather.Matthews@crawco.ca; For media inquiries, please contact: Gary Gardner, Senior Vice President Global Client Development, Tel: 416.957.5019, Email: Gary.Gardner@crawco.ca

 

Related Links

http://www.crawfordandcompany.com

 

Technology Can Make Return-to-work More Effective and Efficient

Technology Can Make Return-to-work More Effective and EfficientYou are all probably aware of many of the standard strategies that can be employed to ensure timely return to work during and after recovery from an occupational injury or illness.

 

 

Technology Can Make Return to Work More Efficient

 

But are there any newer technologies and approaches that can facilitate this process to make it more effective and expedited?

 

In a previous article, I discussed the critical need for an advanced form of “job description,” which we refer to as a digital job profile (DJP) containing a comprehensive physical demands analysis(PDA).  It bears repeating that the digital job profile is the cornerstone to understanding the explicit, quantitative demands of a job, and is utilized by all stakeholders in the claim management continuum. How can we return an individual to modified or full duty without knowing exactly what the job requirements are?

 

 

Psychological Component Can Play Greater Role Than Biological

 

Many of you are aware of the biopsychosocial model of injury or illness. In short, this is the recognition that non-physical factors highly impact functional restoration. In fact, many experts feel that the psychosocial components play a greater role than biological ones. You have undoubtedly noticed that the same type of injury may be devastating to one individual, while a more resilient person easily overcomes it. It is extremely helpful to predict whether your claimant is likely to be in the former or latter category.  If the claimant is fragile from a psychosocial perspective, many mitigation strategies can be employed to prevent the delayed return to work/life activities that inevitably accompanies these comorbidities.

 

Fortunately, there are automated, online screening tools available that allow you to enter claimant responses to a brief series of questions, and provide you with an immediate, calculated psychosocial risk level (high, medium, low). These validated tools may also recommend various interventions derived from the response pattern of claimants to the questionnaire. Some folks will benefit from cognitive behavior therapy, and others from family counseling, vocational guidance or psychiatric assessment. Risk screening helps to identify the level of risk, as well as appropriate strategies to help individuals better cope with the added stress of an injury or illness.

 

 

Share Digital Job Profile with Treating Clinicians

 

Now that you have shared the digital job profile with treating clinicians, allowing them to set rehabilitation modalities and goals, and have dealt with any potential psychosocial risks, what is the most efficient way to monitor progress and make decisions about return to work? Again, technology to the rescue!  One can send the digital job profile to a clinician, such as a physician or physical /occupational therapist, along with an online app that allows them to quickly and electronically document the capacities and/or restrictions and limitations related to any impacted body regions. This information is then instantly available to claim adjusters and nurse case managers and allows for quick determinations about a return to full or transitional modified duties, and at the end of treatment, this facilitates the “job matching” process. Automated algorithms can assess whether the claimant can return to their own job, alternate employment at the same company, or any other job contained within an extensive jobs database.

 

These processes streamline the recovery and return to work process by applying standardized objective functional metrics, validated screening and analysis tools, and integrated information-sharing among stakeholders. Additionally, they serve as an important defensive strategy given current ADAAA regulations and EEOC challenges.

 

 

Jacob Lazarovic MD, Medical Advisor at Amaxx LLC, Chief Medical Officer at MyAbilities. has considerable experience in managed care, including 18 years as chief medical officer at Broadspire, a leading TPA. His department produced clinical guidelines and criteria to support sound medical claim and case management practices; participated in analysis, reporting and benchmarking of outcomes and quality improvement initiatives; developed educational and training programs that updated the clinical knowledge and skills of claim professionals and nurses; provided expertise to enhances the medical bill review process; and operated a comprehensive and unique in-house physician review (peer review) service. He has been published extensively in industry journals and has held several senior medical management positions at companies including HealthAmerica, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida and Vivra Specialty Partners

Quality Job Profiles Are Critical to Optimally Manage Workers’ Compensation

Quality Job Profiles Are Critical to Optimally Manage Workers’ CompensationFirst, let’s get our terminology straight. The terms “job profile” or “job description” are often used synonymously. These two terms refer to a more-or-less complete depiction of the tasks, physical and perhaps cognitive demands, and environmental characteristics of a particular position at a particular employer.

 

A well-designed job profile has great potential value, but the truth is that many employers have not expended the resources and time to develop comprehensive and quantitative databases of all their company’s positions.

 

In my experience, many jobs have no available profiles whatsoever, and when they do exist they are often incomplete, qualitative, sketchy documents on paper that provide little useful, actionable information.

 

 

Why is a Good Job Profile Important?

 

A good job profile describes every task and function of the job with detailed physical demands for each task.  A good job profile can:

 

  • set out the requirements of the job which can optionally be used for post-offer testing
  • identify ergonomic risks that can be modified to avoid injuries in high-intensity job tasks
  • explicitly document the body regions most susceptible to injury for each job, allowing for targeted fitness programs that can proactively reduce injuries. Preventing injuries is preferable to treating them!

 

Job profiles need to be presented in a “user-friendly” digital format, using accessible graphic displays and even annotated videos of the job being performed. Users need to be able to manipulate the data to find exactly the level of detailed information they require.

 

 

Easily Share Roadmap For Recovery

 

If and when an occupational injury occurs, the job profile should be electronically shared with the employer’s claim and medical managers, whether the employer self-manages claims, or these services are performed by an external TPA, carrier, or by other managed care entities. This is invaluable as the claim/medical team now has a “roadmap” for the recovery and rehabilitation process, aiming to achieve the specific physical demand goals depicted in the job profile.

 

 

The job profile can and should be securely shared electronically with treating clinicians (physicians, therapists, etc.) who now have accurate information to rely on for treatment planning purposes.

 

  • Progress can be easily monitored against job demands, enabling timely decisions about restrictions/limitations and return-to-work capabilities, as well as an assessment of the efficacy of the current treatment regimen.
  • Should the claimant achieve maximal medical improvement short of his/her present job demands, the residual capabilities can be automatically compared to all other available jobs in the employer’s database to match the claimant to other suitable employment available at his/her company (or elsewhere ).

 

 

Job Profiles Are Critical To Optimally Manage Human Capital

 

In summary, job profiles are critical for employers to optimally manage their valuable human capital proactively to maintain fitness, safety, and productivity, as well as for the cost-effective management of medical recovery, rehabilitation and return to work when occupational injury or illness occurs.

 

 

Jacob Lazarovic MD, Medical Advisor at Amaxx LLC, Chief Medical Officer at MyAbilities, has considerable experience in managed care, including 18 years as chief medical officer at Broadspire , a leading TPA. His department produced clinical guidelines and criteria to support sound medical claim and case management practices; participated in analysis, reporting and benchmarking of outcomes and quality improvement initiatives; developed educational and training programs that updated the clinical knowledge and skills of claim professionals and nurses; provided expertise to enhances the medical bill review process; and operated a comprehensive and unique in-house physician review (peer review) service. He has been published extensively in industry journals and has held several senior medical management positions at companies including HealthAmerica, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida and Vivra Specialty Partners

6 Opportunities to Improve Your Return to Work Program

7 Opportunities to Improve Your Return to Work ProgramLost time from work is a significant driver in workers’ compensation claims.  Consider some of the following statistics:

 

  • On any given workday, up to 5% of the total US workforce is off work;

 

  • Lost wages and productivity account for $267 billion per year – with roughly $88 billion of that amount attributed to work injuries; and

 

  • Time off from work due to injury accounts for additional stressors on employees, employers and the claims management team. This includes increased workplace dissatisfaction, loss of workplace morale, increased overtime (including mandatory overtime costs) and a reduction in the quality of work one performs.

 

The bottom line is nobody wins when an employee is off work due to an injury.  Based on these factors, interested stakeholder seeking to improve their workers’ compensation programs and improve efficiency should seek to return injured workers to work – and do so as soon as possible.

 

 

Opportunities to Return Employees to Work

 

Quick and effective return to work benefits all interested stakeholders.  There are countless ways to return an employee to work following an injury.  It takes time and energy, but it has many benefits to the program’s bottom line.  This requires a plan that needs to be in writing and strictly followed to drive program efficiency.

 

  • Prepare a written RTW policy: This policy should encourage all employees regardless of their age, tenure with the employer or position to return to work following a work injury.  It should require contact between all interested stakeholders.  One key consideration is the number of weeks an employee can perform light duty work with the date of injury employer.  Doing so tends to motivate employee’s to return to return quickly to work.

 

  • Prepare a written job description: When it comes to job descriptions, the devil is the details.  Important information should conform to the state’s workers’ compensation act and what is considered “suitable gainful” employment.  Items that need to be defined include both the essential and marginal functions the employee will perform.  The wages and hours and employee will work are also important;

 

  • Identify a RTW Coordinator: A RTW Coordinator serves an important role in the RTW process.  Not only are they are responsible for serving as a point of contact for the employer, but they will also understand the myriad of complex legal issues associated with workers’ compensation.  This includes such matters as short-term disability, ADA, and FMLA;

 

  • Identify and catalog light duty jobs available: There are countless activities an injured worker can perform in a light duty capacity that meets a wide variety of work restrictions.  Clerical positions that are generally sedentary include answering telephones, filing documents and checking safety supplies.  Other positions one can consider for employees with medium duty restrictions include light maintenance, cleaning common areas, updating safety materials (policies and procedures and First Aid kits) and grounds maintenance.

 

  • RTW form development: Workers’ compensation is a form driven system which can be used to one’s advantage in the RTW setting.  Forms can include job offers, acceptance of duty letters and other communications.  Well drafted forms help communicate policies, procedures and expectations to everyone.

 

  • Communication with the workforce: It is important that all employees are aware of and understand a well-written and consistently implemented policy.  Steps to make sure this occurs includes incorporating the RTW aspects of the workplace into new employee orientation, easily accessible workers’ compensation forms, and ongoing education during quarterly/annual workplace safety training and meetings.  Mentioning it at all trainings reinforces the importance of RTW as a workplace policy and can boost workplace morale.

 

Conclusions

 

Lost time following a work injury reduces the profitability of an employer and increases the cost of a workers’ compensation program.  Taking affirmative steps to put injured people back to work through an RTW program, increase a program’s efficiency, and make a company for efficient.  Part of this includes creating an effective RTW policy and making sure it is implemented within a workplace environment.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

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