Communicate Your Work Comp Program So Employees Use It

Having a great workers’ comp program is meaningless if your employees don’t know about it and use it. To get your employees to know about the program, you have to tell them about it, not just once. After initially delivering the information about your workers’ comp program, you need to reinforce and remind them of its importance. And it is not enough that the employees know about it, they have to be willing and able to use the program you have in place. All necessary information must be readily and easily accessible to all your employees and so familiar to them that they instantly know where to find all necessary information.

 

 
Make the Message Fit the Environment

 

Design your workers’ comp materials to fit the environment. A printed brochure may work for clerical employees who work at a desk and can put them in a file folder. But will a brochure work for a factory floor worker without file space? Probably not. A brochure handed to that worker will likely end up in the round filing cabinet, i.e. a waste receptacle after being piled somewhere with other papers.

 

Think about where your employees work, take breaks, gather and socialize when thinking about how and where to communicate your workers’ comp messages. The delivery of information must take into consideration the location where the communication is occurring. An auto visor packet might be good in a company vehicle. Wallet cards might be good for employees who go into the field. Signs near water coolers and restrooms are good reinforcers. Lamination of the materials is important where there is the potential for dirt or moisture in an environment that can ruin plain paper.

 

 
Combine Methods to Maximize Impact

 

Think about how you want to deliver your message. Using a combination of methods may be the best way to continually drive home your messages. For example, you may want to hand out or mail brochures to new employees with an annual update. Then you can also put up posters throughout the work area and in break rooms, give employees wallet or lanyard cards, and put a zippered three-ring mobile folder in all vehicles and toolboxes.

 

Another constant reminder is a sticker label to be put on telephones. This way the name and numbers of who to call when there is an injury or a claim is called in are immediately accessible to those making the calls.

 

 
Tailor the Message to the Audience

 

Think about your audience when designing your message materials. Do you have non-English speaking workers? Then your materials should also be translated into their first language. Are your employees eighth grade or college graduates? Make sure that your messages are clearly communicated in the simplest language possible. Don’t use several ten-dollar words where one ten-cent one will work. Your materials for your supervisors and upper management can be more in depth than is needed for your line workers. Also, the materials in your employee handbooks and safety plans can have much more detail than is needed in your program posters and wallet cards.

 

 
Make the Messages Easy to Read

 

Are your materials well lit and in big and dark enough font to be easily readable? As any middle aged worker in desperate need of reading glasses will tell you, they cannot see the same font size in a lighter color or that is against a non-contrasting background. Test their readability before their final printing. A clearly worded message won’t be read by employees who can’t easily see it.

 

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

How Well Are Your Claims Performing?

Keeping tabs on your financial books is probably the utmost important task for any business owner and/or organization.

 

In the event you are “loose” so to speak with the books, you can quickly find you and your company or organization in quite a financial pickle. With that said, not only should you be measuring the financial performance of the business you oversee, but also that of your employees and quite frankly yourself.
On way to go about making sure you’re properly self-measuring your performance in the workers compensation arena is by setting a number of benchmarks.

 

In the event you hit or surpass those benchmarks, things should be in good hands for you. If not, you certainly by all means have some work to do.

 

 

Review Your Efforts

 
As part of what should be in an annual “review process” for your business or organization, review your financial numbers and overall work performance. If things are not where they need to be then set a goal by the time your next review arrives to get them there or beyond.

 
Among the benchmarks to look at:

 
Claim Financial Benchmarks – With this, review the changes in the average claim expense. Use a comparison of the typical expense for medical benefits, indemnity benefits and claim expenses. The data should not be hard to obtain, and it gives you the ability to compare your claim expense with the prior month and quarter, along with the previous year among other time periods;

 
Average Claim Expenses Within the Industry – One facet you want to key in on is your typical claim cost is representative of others in your business sector. When looking for relative data, keep in mind that a number of bigger TPAs and sizable workers comp insurers have a portion of data available. The National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) does gather payment statistics in the 35-plus/minus states wherein they are active;

 
Ratio for reserves and payments (three months before closing) to final claim expense – When you compare what the adjuster has compiled for reserves along with claim payments made three months before the claim closing date, with the final figure paid for the claim, you can better determine the accuracy for your large claim reserve. [Exclude the claims closed in less than 180 days]. The ratio of reserves along with the dollars previously paid on the claim, to the final claim cost should be about 1.0. In the event the ratio is below 1.0, the overall claims are under reserved. If the ratio is higher than 1.0, there is on average additional funds sitting in reserves.

 

 

 

Claim Handling Process Benchmarks

 
While there are a variety of options to gauge your claim handling, here are some suggestions for measuring claim-handling performance:

 
Average bill process time –Here you will have a comparison of days between the date the medical bill, legal services bill or other cost was obtained in the claims office, and the date the payment in fact was processed. This permits you to measure the timeliness of your bill payment process and gauge the progress provided by your staff.

 
Closing ratios – This is the ratio of files open during each month, quarter or year in comparison to the files closed during the same time frame. The goal here is for a figure of 1.0 or better.

 
Percentage of closed files with payments higher than $1,000 – This indicator is set to make the claim office honest on the closing ratios. Unfortunately, it is too easy to manipulate closing ratios, so this gives you the claim office close files prematurely when the number of closed claims with payment increases.

 
Average time to input initial reserve – Even though different claim offices have different standards as to how quickly the initial reserve should be in the computer system, by comparing the present average length of time to a previous month, quarter or year, you can gauge how soon the adjusters are inputting initial reserves.

 
Files on diary – This involves measuring the files that are being actively worked on the diary. Ideally, the claim office has every file on diary to prevent the files from stagnating.

 
Files with missed diary – This benchmark can in turn be a list of the files where the diary has not been updated the diary due date has passed, or it can be a percentage of the files for a claim handling due date that has since expired. This provides you with insight into how current the claims office is in when it comes to handling of the claims.

 

 

Your company’s claims’ performance should always be of importance to you.
If you are falling behind in this arena, you very well could see your financial books go from black to red in a short amount of time, something no business owner or organization will want.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Employee Incentives to Delay Return to Work

Promptly returning injured employees to work is a major factor for reducing workers compensation exposure and excess cost. The longer the employee remains off duty chances develop that may lead to exaggeration of symptoms, excessive disability, additional medical pathologies, the ability to live on weekly benefits, and potential fraud.

 

Employee Incentives to Delay Return to Work:

 

1. Most jurisdictions have weekly benefits established at sixty six and two thirds to seventy percent of the employee’s average weekly wage with an annualized cap on benefits.

 

The majority of benefit caps are high enough for better than survivorship living. Most states do not discount the average weekly wage for taxes and other wage deductions. All workers compensation benefits are free from federal and state income taxes.

 

2. Supplemental benefits from social security may be available to the employee after certain periods of disability or due to disabilities. Eligibility for food stamps, rent subsidies, utility subsidies, family health coverage under Medicaid or Medicare, possible transportation subsidies and or other numerous welfare programs may also be added benefits.

 

3. Medical providers may have tendency to extend time off work. This is especially probable where the employee has free choice of medical care, legal representation, union support, and a weak or poor moral or work ethic.

 

4. Not keeping in touch with the employee may lead to, feelings of alienation, lack of caring, self-pity, over indulgence of symptoms and attitude deterioration.

 

5. Lack of attention to the claim’s progression may allow a deterioration that might never be able to be recovered.

 

6. High income employees often do not receive enough in compensation benefits due to the benefit caps. Therefore, they are not prone to fall prey to these incentives.

 

 

Employer Recommendations:

 

1. Establish a program for injury disability management, and return to work options. Outline responsibilities of the employer and employee as required by both federal and state statutes. Post the policy in employee hand books, contracts and on bulletin boards.

 

2. Include some alternate or light duty jobs that can be performed by the employee during recovery. Point out that every effort will be made to accommodate the employee in a job suited to physical capacity during recovery. This will allow new jobs to be developed. Seek the help of Foremen, Supervisors, Union Shop Stewarts and Legal Counsel for jobs that might be developed.

 

3. Make unions a part of the program through negotiation and contractual commitment.

 

4. When the injury occurs, give the employee written highlights of the disability program. Include any authorizations as necessary. Send copies to the attending medical provider. Contact or direct the employee to review the full program in the employee handbook as a reminder and for compliance.

 

If the employee’s injury is such as to void his capacities have a family member or responsible person made aware of the policy until such time as the employee can again act on their own behalf.

 

5. Send the attending medical provider the requirements for job modifications and capacities required. Jobs can also be developed from the medical provider’s restrictions.

 

6. Move for Independent Medical Examinations as soon as medical disabilities extend beyond normal healing periods. Use the independent medical exam to establish job functional capacities.

 

7. Keep weekly contact with the employee. Ask how healing is progressing and what activities can be performed. Emphasize a strong upbeat attitude with the employee. Show definitive concerns for the employee’s recovery. Inquire as to how the injury might be impacting the employee’s family. Verify that benefits are correct and being paid timely. Be pro-active in addressing any employee concerns.

Ask the employee for alternate work ideas. Keep the employee aware of any workplace changes that occur during disability. Discuss how the employee’s absence is affecting fellow employees and work friends. Let the employee know of fellow employee well wishes and concerns.

 

Discuss information learned from employee with foremen and supervisors to form a plan of action for return to work.

 

8. Review need for medical and vocational rehabilitation. If needed, ascertain that the program has specific goals, time frames and a definitive resolution period.

 

9. Review the medical provider visits and recovery correlation. When they do not meet accepted standards, seek an Independent Medical Examination, a Consultation or a Utilization Review. Move for resolution through controversy if necessary.

 

10. Adjust job site environments for physical accommodation where necessary.

 

11. Document all offers for employment, functional capacity evaluations, independent medical examinations, and controversy issues in writing. It may be necessary to send these letters by regular and registered mail. If any are done electronically, they must be securely backed up for evidentiary purposes. Hard copies should also be part of the claim file.

 

12. Move to contest any situation where the employee becomes non-compliant, appears to be extending disability or develops pathologies that were not presented at the time of injury. This requires proper investigations, medical examinations, and documentation.

 

13. Utilize field investigators in the event suspicion arises for possible fraud or cheating. Make sure the findings are strong enough to withstand litigation and possible SIU prosecution.

 

 

Summary:

 

The average employee who receives a worker’s compensation benefit that is equal to or greater than take home pay, and other possible social welfare benefits, to survive without returning to work.

 

This requires employers to be pro-active, innovative and vigilant in efforts to return the employee to work. For further thoughts and assistance in this area, it is suggested outside consultation be considered.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

 

 

Social Media Basics for Attorneys and Claims Professionals

Social media is web-based interaction that is highly accessible and utilizes scalable publishing techniques. According to Wikipedia, there are over 300 “active” and “well known” social media sites. Some of the more commonly used social media sites include Facebook, Twitter and Linked In.

 

 

Why Should Claim Handlers Care?

 

Even though there has been a steady decline in the use of social media by American youth, it continues to be a popular form of communication and interaction among Generation X’ers and Baby Boomers. Unlike other forms of communication, social media leaves a permanent record that is digital and easily discoverable. There are also a growing number of data collection services such as Spokeo.com, which compile information from social networks, marketing surveys, real estate listing, government censuses resources and other accessible sources.

 

With the rise in the collection of data, there are several benefits to the workers’ compensation claim handler.

 

• Cost effective form of surveillance: Obtain background information and checking honesty/integrity of claimant;

• Discovery: Monitor post-injury activities, or verify limitations or severity of injury; and

• Legal ramifications: Credibility of the party/witness and facts of case – damages/liability, jury considerations, etc.

 

 

Ethics for Social Media

 

Attorneys using social media as part of their discovery efforts should be aware of ethical issues. Professional conduct rules may vary from jurisdiction-to-jurisdiction, so it is important to check when handling any case.

 

• RULE 1.6: Confidentiality of Information

• RULE 4.2: Communication with Person Represented by Counsel

• RULE 4.3: Dealing With Unrepresented Person

• RULE 5.3: Responsibility for Non-Lawyer Assistants

• RULE 8.4: Misconduct

 

Lawyers should also be aware that in at least one jurisdiction, failure to investigate ethically social networking sites violated the lawyer’s duty of competence and diligence.

 

 

Case Law and Social Media

 

Courts are becoming more aware of social media and its societal implications on the judicial system. It is important to be aware of legal precedent and how it can influence your case.

 

Beye v. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of N.J., No. 2:06-cv-5377-FSH-PS, (D.N.J. Dec. 14, 2007). The Insurer sought production of all e-mails, journals, diaries, and communications involving eating disorders or symptoms related to the Claimant. The court allowed for broad discovery related to Facebook and MySpace that was shared with other people.

 

Bass v. Miss Porter’s School, No. 3:08cv1807 (JBA), 2009 WL 3724968 (D. Conn. Oct. 27, 2009). Litigation involved the harassment of a high school student at an elite boarding school. The court held discovery “should not be limited to plaintiff’s own determination of what may be ‘reasonably calculated’ to lead to the discovery of admissible evidence.”

 

Moreno v. Hanford Sentinel Inc., 91 Cal Rptr. 3d 858, 862 (Cal. Ct. App. 2009). The court determined that person who makes information available to anyone with a computer also makes the information available to the public at large.

 

EEOC v. Simply Storage Management, LLC, No. 1:09-cv-1223-WTL-DML, (S.D. Ind. May 11, 2010). The Employee objected to demand for production of documents related to social networking. The judge ordered Employee to produce social networking profile information.

 

 

Social Media and Ethical Claim Management

 

Claim professionals should be aware of rules or laws that govern discovery in workers’ compensation claims. While some jurisdictions have adopted ethical codes, it is important to note that failure to follow adopted litigation norms can harm the interests of your company, client, put your license and/or job in jeopardy and subject you to civil fines.

 

• Claim handlers should use social media as a discovery tool and incorporate this information into recorded statements;

 

• Claim handlers should be aware of various ethical and professional limitations involved in social media “discovery;”

 

• Claim handlers should be aware that some items may not be discoverable in court; and

 

• Claim handlers should use professional judgment in personal posts, tweets, blogs, etc.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

 

 

Important Points to Include in Account Handling Instructions

Account handling instructions inform insurance adjusters on how to handle a company’s workers’ compensation claims. Every insurance company or third-party administrator (TPA) has them, although they may refer to them by different names. Account handling instructions are also called “account service instructions” (ASIs) or “special account instructions.”
Make sure you have input into the preparation of these instructions. Items you want in your ASIs will vary depending on the carrier or TPA’s best practices. The following items are taken from our Workers’ Comp Kit’s Improvement Plan.
Don’t be afraid to negotiate for the terms you want in your account handling instructions. If you have a guaranteed cost program, you will not have as much leverage as if you are self-insured or in a large deductible program, but don’t let that stop you from trying to get what you want.

 

Make sure to look at least the following items on your ASI Checklist:
File Management

 

  1. Can you change your account instructions?
  2. Can you review the complete original claim file?

 

Bill Review

 

  1. Do you see copies of all payments made on each open file?
  2. Do you review for accuracy checks or an itemization of all payments made?
  3. Are statements recorded on all claims where compensability is questionable such as heart attacks, stress claims, unusual injuries or claims where liability is not clear?
  4. How and when are medical bills audited?
  5. What levels of hospital bills are audited?
  6. Who will audit these hospital bills?

Referrals to Physician Consultants and Medical Advisors

 

  1. How are outside vendor services activated and coordinated?
  2. Are all medical records sent to a Medical Advisor before scheduling an independent medical examination (IME)?
  3. Does a doctor write an IME cover letter?
  4. Does a doctor make sure the timing is appropriate for an IME?
  5. Does your company decide if medical case management is warranted?
  6. Is there an immediate and automatic referral of complex lost-time cases to medical case management?

Reporting

 

  1. How often do you receive status reports for open claims from your insurer?
  2. Is the reporting period for 30, 60 or 90 days?
  3. Even though you may have been provided access to run reports, can you request the insurer to run them for you?

Reserves

 

  1. Are you provided with a written explanation each time the insurer raises reserves over $10,000 or more?
  2. Does the reserve amount take into consideration things like your company’s aggressive return-to-work program, which may result in lower wages lost?

Dedicated Adjuster

 

  1. How many adjusters are dedicated to processing claims for your account?
  2. Does the adjuster have a full-time administrator? One adjuster with a full-time administrator can handle more than an adjuster without an administrator.

Investigations

 

  1. How do you request investigations?
  2. Will you receive copies of investigation reports and videos?
  3. Are emergency room records always obtained for every worker treated there?

Structured Settlements & MSA Set-Asides

 

  1. Do you consider structured settlements for all cases over $25,000?
  2. Are Medicare set-aside (MSA) settlements structured?
  3. Who handles compliance for these types of settlements?

Subrogation

 

  1. Are all cases reviewed for subrogation potential?
  2. Who closes a file and waives subrogation recovery?
  3. Are you consulted before a lien is waived or compromised?

Utilization Review

 

  1. How do you decide which bills and services are reviewed?
  2. Who provides this service?

Referral to Vocational Rehabilitation

 

  1. Who decides if a referral should be made to vocational rehabilitation?
  2. Are complex lost-time cases automatically referred to vocational rehabilitation?
  3. Will voc rehab reports be sent to your company?

Legal Issues

 

  1. Who selects legal counsel?
  2. What type of legal counsel is used- panel or outside counsel?
  3. Are your attorneys members of the Council of Litigation Management? See http://litmgmt.org.
  4. Is alternative dispute resolution (ADR) considered on all claims?
  5. Are you or your subrogating insurance carriers members of the non-profit Center for Public Resources that avoids litigation and pursues ADR? If so, is this noted?
  6. Do you receive copies of bills for legal services?

Settlement Authority

 

  1. Who has the authority to settle a claim? Whether your company or the insurance adjuster has the authority to settle a claim can make a big difference in your bottom line. How much authority you get depends on the type of insurance program you have.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

 

 

Why Workers Comp Is Better Than Bartending

Allow me to introduce myself. I am the founder of Workers Compensation Roundtable on LinkedIn and a former bartender who moved on to workers comp. After college, I spent several years bartending – great fun – but when it came time to do something real, I was impressed by what a good time the law students hanging out at the bar after their evening studies were having, and I said to myself, “I CAN DO THAT!”

 


As Litigation Manager At Fortune 500 Corporation I Learned Workers Comp Could Be Fixed

 

Fast forward 4 years… As litigation manager at a Fortune 500 corporation, with over 80 operating units I learned about manufacturing freezers, coolers, slicers, grinders, automotive parts and even chiropractic tables. I also learned all the ways people got injured on products and in the workplace. BUT, most importantly, I learned the importance of communication. Communicating with Senior Management, GMs, Supervisors and Employees — everyone in the chain had to know that workers’ comp was a huge cost to our company. They also had to know that it COULD be fixed!

 

The problem was, I knew nothing about workers comp! When I noticed the costs on the loss run going up, I was not sure whether I was the “insured” or the “insurer.”  So, like some of you, I learned from the ground up and developed a program that reduced our corporation’s loss costs 50%. I did it by not taking “no” for an answer from the insurance company, broker or TPA. I did not want to hear excuses like, “That’s not the way we do it.”

 

After reducing costs 50% our program was featured in the Wall Street Journal. That is when I started the original Workers Compensation Roundtable of which you are a member today.

 

 

New England Workers Comp Roundtable Began in Early 90’s

 

When the WCJ article came out, companies from everywhere called and wanted to learn the keys to cost containment. After American Tourister and Bates Casket visited us, I began an informal group of risk managers that met twice yearly, each meeting hosted by a member to share new techniques and strategies. The host provided lunch and a small gift from their company (that was especially fun when Heublein hosted since their product was liquor). We met at News Corp, Heublein, Stanley Works, American Tourister, Melville Corporation, ASEA Brown Boveri, Fleet Bank.

 

Today, many things in the world have changed but the keys to cost containment have not.
 

When I moved back to CT, Marsh asked me to develop an Injury Management Program for their clients. Later I had the same opportunity at Aon, and Aon’s Comp Camp. While training brokerage clients, I worked directly with companies of all sizes in all industry sectors. The problems of the companies were often similar, with slight variations depending on the industry. The solutions were usually simple once the problems had been correctly identified.

 

 

After 25+ Years of Hands on Experience, I Wrote a Book Containing Workers Comp Best Practices

 

After 25+ years of working hands-on with companies, I have written a book containing techniques and strategies that were most helpful to reduce workers comp costs. No client has achieved less than 20% reduction in losses. Many have become Best-In-Class, and most reduced their costs 50% or more.

 

There is so much value in being a part of a cost containment community such as the Roundtable.  Because of this we are now offering $75.00 OFF our COMPREHENSIVE BOOK to our Roundtable members.  Enter WC75 in the coupon code box at  http://corner.advisen.com/wcbooks

 

The chapters are:

 

1. Work Comp Fundamentals

2. Cost Containment Basics

3. Training & Building Commitment

4. Roles & Responsibilities

5. Reporting the Claim

6. Post Injury Response

7. Communication with Employees

8. Working with Your Insurance Adjuster

9. Safety & Loss Control

10. Wellness

11. Return to Work

12. Indemnity Cost Containment

13. Medical Care

14. Medical Cost Containment

15. Fighting Fraud & Abuse

16. Rehabilitating the Injured Employee

17. Managing Prescription Drug Use

18. Claims Resolution & Settlements

 

Click to review the complete Table of Contents and Sample Pages.
 

To get $75.00 OFF the book for the month of June enter the Coupon Code: WC75 into the box    http://corner.advisen.com/wcbooks

 

If you want something more CONDENSED, try our MINI-BOOK which is a one-page summary of every chapter in the Comprehensive Edition.

Brokers and Agents: bulk rates are available. View branded book samples. Many brokers and agents provide the branded book as a gift to clients and prospects.

 

Thank you for listening to how The Roundtable began, and for sharing your experiences in our LinkedIn Workers Compensation Roundtable! Please feel free to invite your friends to join our great group!

 

Best,


Rebecca Shafer
Risk Consultant/Attorney
 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Work Comp Claims: You Can’t Improve What You Don’t Measure

All successful companies measure their performance. Non-financial measurements might include number of defects per 1,000 units, number of units produced per shift, or average number of days between unit production and final sale. Financial measurements on a company level often include profit per unit produced, net income as a percent of sales, total income produced, net income earned, etc. Measuring the performance of your workers’ compensation claims handling is just as important for the success of your work comp program as your company’s performance measurements are to the success of your company.

 

Non-financial performance measurements in workers’ compensation often tie in with the quality of the claims handling by the work comp adjusters. Measuring the performance of the individual adjuster, the supervisor’s unit, and the claims office against prior performance will indicate if the claims handling is improving, declining or staying about the same.

 

 

Claim Handling Criteria That Can Be Measured

 

Objectives outlined in the claims office’s Best Practices provided excellent criteria on which to measure the employer’s performance, the adjuster, the adjuster’s unit and the claims office. Claims handling criteria that can be measured includes:

 

• Number of days from employee injury to employer notification
• Number of days from employer notification to claims office notification
• Number of days from claims office notification to employer contact
• Percentage of insured’s contacted timely
• Number of days from claims office notification to employee contact
• Percentage of employees contacted timely
• Number of days from claims office notification to medical provider contact
• Percentage of medical providers contacted timely
• Percentage of claim investigations completed timely
• Percentage of wage statements requested timely
• Percentage of compensability decisions made timely
• Number of days from claims office notification to first indemnity payment
• Percentage of indemnity payments made timely
• Percentage of medical bills paid timely
• Percentage of files with timely reserves
• Percentage of files with timely reserve changes
• Percentage of files with timely filing of ISO inquiry

 

This is not meant to be an all-inclusive list of criteria that can be measured. There are other non-financial measurements that can be made. A review of your Best Practices will provide you with other criteria that can be measured.

 

More prominent is the usage of financial measurements to measure claim handling performance. Financial measurements are easy to come by with simple computer programming to spit out the data requested.

 

 

Financial Measurements to Measure Claim Handling Quality

 

Financial measurements frequently used to measure claim handling quality include:

 

• Average cost per claim
• Average amount paid for indemnity benefits
• Average amount paid for medical benefits
• Average amount paid for legal expenses
• Average amount paid for medical management expenses
• Average amount paid for vocational/rehabilitation benefits
• Average amount paid for adjusting expenses
• Average amount paid for all expenses
• Average cost of lump sum settlements
• Average number of days open for medical only claims
• Average number of days open for lost time claims
• Lump sum settlements as a percentage of total claim cost

 

It should be noted that depending on the number of workers’ compensation claims an employer has, one or a few catastrophic claims can distort the financial measurements on a short term basis.

 

Some employers try to rely only on financial measurements to judge claims handling quality. That is a mistake. While the financial measurements may improve, if the overall claim handling quality is sub-par, the financial measurements are not as near as good as they could be.

 

 

Track Both Non-Financial and Financial Performance

 

By tracking both the non-financial and the financial performance measurements, both on a monthly basis and on an annual basis, the employer is able to see overall trends. This allows the employer to work with the claims office to focus on areas where specific improvement is needed and to work to improve the overall claims handling product.
For assistance on setting up measurements of your performance, or for evaluating your on-going performance in controlling your workers’ compensation claims, please contact us.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

 

 

 

The Evolving Matter Of Liability Medicare Set-Asides

Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. §1395y (b) (2) (A) (ii), CMS/Medicare is the “secondary payer” in all workers’ compensation, no-fault and general liability claims. Under the Medicare Secondary Payer Act (MSP), CMS has taken the position that they are the secondary payer regardless of liability and they have a statutory right of recovery against all parties, including law firms involved in the claim, related to their past interests and/or future interests.

 

 

The Great Debate: “Reimbursement” or “Coordination of Benefits”

 

Like any law, the MSP and the use of Medicare Set-Asides (MSA) is subject to debate and interpretation. While the use of MSAs in workers’ compensation cases is for the most part well settled, there is little clarity of their use in cases outside workplace injuries.

 

Some people view the MSP in the context of non-workers’ compensation cases as being only a “reimbursement” statute, where consideration of Medicare’s interests is limited to conditional payments only. In support of this argument, people who subscribe to this line of thinking point out that the asserted powers of CMS amount to nothing more than an unconstitutional “taking” or “tax” on litigation, without statutory support. They also note that none of the regulations concerning the MSP and these types of claims found in 42 C.F.R. §§411.20-54, support the notion of “future medicals.”

 

On the other hand, the MSP can also be viewed as a “coordination of benefits” statute. In taking this viewpoint, it can be argued that regardless of regulation, the statute applies in all personal injury and workers’ compensation cases. Further, the definition of a “conditional payment” fits cases of both past and future payments made by Medicare related to a beneficiary.

 

 

Agency Support for LMSAs

 

Prior to 2011, CMS policy memoranda were directed at workers’ compensation plans. In May 2011, Sally Stalcup, CMS’s Region VI (Dallas) MSP Regional Coordinator issued a general memorandum regarding Liability Medicare Set-Asides (LMSAs). In this memorandum it was noted that, “Medicare’s interests must be protected; however, CMS does not mandate a specific mechanism to protect those interests. The law does not require a ‘set-aside’ in any situation. The law requires that the Medicare Trust Funds be protected from payment for future services whether it is a Workers’ Compensation or liability case. There is no distinction in the law.”

 

The memorandum was followed in September 30, 2011, by a statement regarding MSAs in non-workers’ compensation case by Charlotte Benson of CMS/Office of Financial Management.

 

 

Judicial Notice of MSAs in Liability Cases?

 

At this point, there is no controlling published legal decision regarding the use or recommendation of a MSA in non-workers’ compensation cases. Since 2009, there have been numerous cases that discuss the use of MSA in these cases. However, the cases have mainly been used for review and approval of a MSA amount through judicial means.

 

In Benoit v. Neustrom, acceptance for MSAs in non-workers’ compensation cases gained additional acceptance. In this case, an inmate within the Louisiana correctional system sustained permanent brain injuries resulting from the allegation of prisoner neglect. At the time of settlement, the parties were confronted with the issue of how to consider Medicare’s interests when a MSA allocation exceeded the liability policy limits.

 

In addressing this issue, the Court recognized equitable principles and the practical barriers to settlement these issues create. There was also an acknowledgement that the MSP compels consideration of Medicare’s interests and specifically cited the Stalcup Memorandum. In balancing these competing factors, the court determined an appropriate MSA based on a variety of case specific factors.

 

 

Medicare’s Interests in Non-WC Cases

 

Successfully navigating the Medicare maze starts with understanding the MSP. It is important to evaluate your personal injury case from the time the initial claim is made, and continuing that process throughout. In addition to evaluating each case on its merits and facts, it is important to evaluate the following:

 

• Cases where future medical expenses are being considered in the settlement;

• Cases involving a Medicare beneficiary or someone who will be entitled to Medicare in the foreseeable future;

• Catastrophic injury cases such as traumatic brain or spinal cord injuries, multiple amputations or cases involving severe psychological components. Long-term medical care and treatment will be presumed by CMS as necessary in these cases;

• Structured settlements: Medicare generally takes notice of these settlements given that long-term care may be part of the settlement agreement; and

• Any case in which the injured person will certainly require future medical care and treatment for the injury, exposure or ingestion.

 

Finally, remember to always consider Medicare’s interests, and protect the interests of your client(s).

 

 

Conclusions

 

The issue of Medicare’s future interests in liability cases is a hot button topic that puzzles many attorneys and claims handlers. At this point, there is no general consensus among the federal courts or attorneys as to the need for LMSAs as a requirement or recommendation.

 

To complicate matters further, the failure of the CMS to promulgate rules or procedures for LMSAs has further muddied the waters. While arguments can be made on both sides of this issue, it is clear that the CMS, and to some extent the courts, are interested in protecting the solvency of Medicare. Although each case needs to be analyzed on its own merits, the consideration of Medicare’s future interests through the use of LMSAs is clearly one tool that you can use to protect your clients from the iron fist of Medicare.

 

[1] Conditional payments are denied by 42 USC 1395y (b) (2) (B) (ii). Repayment required.  A primary plan, and an entity that receives payment from a primary plan, shall reimburse the appropriate Trust Fund for any payment made by the Secretary under this subchapter with respect to an item or service if it is demonstrated that such primary plan has or had a responsibility to make payment with respect to such item or service. A primary plan’s responsibility for such payment may be demonstrated by a judgment, a payment conditioned upon the recipient’s compromise, waiver, or release (whether or not there is a determination or admission of liability) of payment for items or services included in a claim against the primary plan or the primary plan’s insured, or by other means. (Emphasis added)

 

[1] 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 55971 (E. Dist. La. April 17, 2013)

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

 

 

An Easy Way To Avoid Attorney Involvement In Your Work Comp Claims

A major mistake made by employers in handling workers’ compensation claims is the failure of the employer to build and maintain rapport with the injured employee. Wikipedia defines rapport as “when two or more people feel that they are in sync or on the same wavelength because they feel similar or relate well to each other”.

 

 

Employer Should Contact Injured Worker To Begin Caring & Trusting Relationship

 

The employer’s workers’ compensation coordinator should be in contact with the injured employee the day of the injury to begin to establish a caring and trusting relationship with the employee. By answering all of the employee’s questions about the workers’ compensation process and by showing the employee that the employee is important to the employer, the employee is much less like to develop animosity toward the employer over the accident.

 

Few employees will openly admit to themselves or to anyone else that it was their own carelessness that caused their injury. When there is no rapport between the employee and the employer, it is much easier for an employee to blame the employer for the injury, rather than to say ‘it was my inattention to what I was doing that caused me to get hurt’. When proper rapport with the claimant is established, the injured employee is much more objective about the cause of their injury.

 

When the workers’ compensation coordinator actively works with the injured employee to schedule medical care, to arrange light duty work, to answer any questions the employee has about the workers’ compensation claim process, and to reassure the employee that the employer has the employee’s best interest at heart, the course of the workers’ compensation claim is much smoother.

 

 

Fear Is Primary Reason An Employee Hires Attorney

 

Fear is the primary reason an employee hires an attorney following an injury. The employee can be fearful of one or more of the following concerns:

 

• The inability to support or provide for their family during the recovery time of the injury

• The inability to support or provide for their family in the future

• Losing their job due to their inability to work

• Being ostracize for causing the accident and the resulting injury

• Having a permanent impairment

• Having to pay the cost of the medical treatment

• Not knowing what to expect

 

It is often said the easiest way to lose control of the claim is to ignore the injured employee after the injury occurs. When the employer does not maintain rapport with the employee following an accident, the employee will find someone to answer his or her questions about the workers’ compensation claim process. If the person providing the answers to the employee is an overzealous attorney whose primary concern is maximizing the attorney’s income, the answers provided to the employee will be designed to drive a wedge between the employee and the employer. The attorney knows the employee may have some sense of loyalty to the employer, and it is important to the attorney to diminish that sense of loyalty, and to encourage the employee to try to get the maximum amount possible for the injury.

 

 

 

Communication Needs To Be Ongoing

 

Immediately following an injury, most employers reassure the employee that everything will be alright, that every problem will be taken care of. Unfortunately, most employers return to the daily activities of their business the day following a workers’ compensation injury, while the employee continues to deal with the injury aftermath for weeks or even months following the injury occurrence.

 

Rapport is maintained by regular, on-going contact with the injured employee. One of the Best Practice used by professional workers’ compensation coordinators is to request the injured employee to call in after each doctor’s appointment with a status update. This accomplishes several things:

 

• It keeps the employee in touch with the employer during the medical recovery process.

• It keeps the employer informed as to the exact medical status of the employee.

• It reassures the employee that the employer is concerned about the employee’s well-being.

• It allows the employer to coordinate the modified duty work with the limitations imposed by the medical provider.

• It keeps a high level of rapport between the employee and the workers’ compensation coordinator

• It allows the workers’ compensation coordinator to address any issues or concerns of the employee that develop during the course of the claim

 

When the employee has a high level of rapport with the employer’s workers’ compensation coordinator, there is a much lower chance that the claim will be contested. By establishing and maintaining rapport throughout the claim, the employer will experience a better overall outcome of the work comp claim.

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Understand The Concept of A Medicare Set-Aside

The concept of a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) continues to complicate and frustrate defense attorneys and claim professionals. Since 2001, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have been issuing “policy memoranda,” which has created only more confusion.

 

 

The term “Medicare Set-Aside” is a Legal Fiction

 

Search all you want through the United States Code or the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) and you will not find the term “Medicare Set-Aside.” It is actually a term first coined in the late 1990s to describe the process or mechanism one can use to consider Medicare’s future interests in a workers’ compensation or personal injury claim.

 

At this point, some argue that MSAs should only be used in workers’ compensation cases. A point of reference for this assertion is found in federal regulation that concern workers’ compensation settlements. One such regulation is located at 42 C.F.R. §411.46 (b) (2), which states, “If a settlement appears to represent an attempt to shift to Medicare the responsibility for payment of medical expenses for the treatment of a work-related condition, the settlement will not be recognized.”

 

 

MSAs Are Never Required

 

An MSA is never required by statute or regulation in any workers’ compensation or liability (personal injury) case. CMS has asserted in policy memoranda and other agency interpretations that parties should consider and protect Medicare’s future interests in all such personal injury claims involving a Medicare beneficiary or someone with a “reasonable expectation” of Medicare entitlement in the foreseeable future.

 

In workers’ compensation matters, CMS has an established review and approval process otherwise known as a Workers’ Compensation Medicare Set-Aside (WCMSA). This process is voluntary and subject to review thresholds where the agency will provide an opinion as to whether a proposed medical allocation is sufficient. Parties choosing to enter this voluntary process should do so with caution as CMS has strict criteria on how a case is evaluated and what medical records are pertinent to the review process. In almost all instances, complete deference is given to the treating doctor’s diagnosis, prognosis and need for future medical care and treatment, including prescription drug use and surgery.

 

 

When Is a MSA Recommended?

 

Successfully navigating the MSA maze starts with understanding the Medicare Secondary Payer Act and the facts of your workers’ compensation or personal injury case. It is important to evaluate your case from the time the initial claim is made, and continuing that process throughout. In addition to evaluating each case on its merits and facts, it is important to evaluate the following:

 

• Cases where future medical expenses are being considered in the settlement;

 

• Cases involving a Medicare beneficiary or someone who will be entitled to Medicare in the foreseeable future;

 

• Catastrophic injury cases such as traumatic brain or spinal cord injuries, multiple amputations or cases involving severe psychological components. Long-term medical care and treatment will be presumed by CMS as necessary in these cases;

 

• Structured settlements: Medicare generally takes notice of these settlements given that long-term care may be part of the settlement agreement; and

 

• Any case in which the injured person will certainly require future medical care and treatment for the injury, exposure or ingestion.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Principal, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

©2014 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

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