Workplace Safety Vital Stated In New British Guide

 

It should not come as a major surprise that healthy workplaces spawn better worker production, not to mention less time missed on the job.
 
With that in mind, a new guide published recently by Britain’s Trades Union Congress (TUC) notes that those business owners who form healthy workplaces can decrease employee absence and boost productivity.
 
The report, Work and wellbeing, aims to promote healthier working and help union safety reps identify what within their workplaces are making staff ill.
 
According to research, every year some 170 million working days are lost due to the fact too many workers are not able to go into work – 23 million of these are due to work-related ill health and 4 million as a result of injuries suffered in the workplace. The number one way of tackling ill health is to halt workers from getting ill in the first place, says the guide.
 
Work and well-being states that the top method for improving the general well-being of a workforce is to change the way that work is organized and managed.
 
Top Goal Should Be Reducing Workplace Stress
 
For example, decreasing stress on the job is far more useful than providing on-site massage for stressed workers.
 
The report also points out that running exercise classes during lunch hours may prove popular with some employees but employers need to ensure that workers have a satisfactory lunch break in order to benefit.
 
Also any lifestyle changes must be made available in a completely non-judgmental manner so that no-one feels any changes are being forced upon them.
 
Work and well-being suggests several means by which employers and unions might attempt to encourage a healthier attitude amongst employees, including:
 
  • Providing an on-site gym or subsidised membership of a local fitness centre
  • Encouraging employees to cycle to work by providing a secure storage place for bikes, introducing schemes where staff can get discounted bikes and cycling accessories and having workplace shower facilities
  • Offering healthy options in the canteen, encouraging staff not to eat lunch at their desks, or by providing a regular supply of free fruit to encourage employees to pick the occasional apple over their regular chocolate bar
  • Giving staff the chance to access employee assistance programmes which can help them cope with personal problems that could have an impact on their performance at work, or offer advice with financial concerns, or on problems they may be having with colleagues.
 
So, how does your workplace look to reduce stress and improve upon worker health?
 
Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.
 
©2013 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Important Fatalities Number Shows Decline, Overall Injuries Increase in Singapore

Fatalities, Major Injuries, Days Lost All See Decreases

 

A new report on Singapore indicates the number of workplace fatalities and major injuries has dropped in the first half this year.

 

According to the latest Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Statistics Report, there were 26 workplace fatalities over the first six months of 2012, a decrease from 31 in the same period last year.

 

There were 246 cases of major injuries, a slight decrease of 3 percent compared to the same period last year. This contributed to a 6 percent dip in man-days lost due to work incidents.

 

 

Minor Injuries See 11.3% Increase

 

As for minor injuries, there were 5,001 cases, or a 11.3 percent jump compared to the same period last year.

 

Overall workplace injuries – which includes fatalities – grew by 10.4 percent.

 

Occupational diseases (ODs) also increased by nearly 67 percent to 603, from 360 over the same period last year. The most common OD (89 percent) is noise-induced deafness followed by occupational skin diseases. The manufacturing sector continued to tally the largest number of OD cases, accounting for 51 percent of total ODs, up from 39 percent of cases as at end June last year.

 

 

Construction, Marine, and Manufacturing See Decreases in Fatalities

 

The Construction, Marine and Manufacturing sectors saw a drop in the number of fatalities.

 

There were 17 fatalities, compared to 25 in the same period last year. However these three sectors saw an increase in major injuries (8 percent) and minor injuries (25 percent).

 

Other sectors (including accommodation, food services, waste management, logistics and transport) contributed to about 35 percent of total work fatalities in the first half of this year, up from 19 percent in the same period last year.

 

Many of these cases were slips, trips and falls from heights as well as workers struck by moving or falling objects.

 

As for major injuries, these sectors witnessed a 14 percent decline while minor injuries saw a marginal 2 percent increase. The logistics and transport, accommodation and food services as well as health sectors accounted for 13 percent of major injuries.

 

 

<pAuthor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Canada Officials on a Blitz for Tower and Crane Safety

 

Tower & Mobile Crane Safety Focus of Blitz
 
Safety of tower and mobile cranes is the focus of a blitz in July and August for officials with Safe at Work Ontario (Canada).
 
According to the Ministry of Labour, a team of more than 25 of its inspectors are visiting construction sites that use tower and mobile cranes. The inspectors have received special training and will climb each tower crane that they inspect. They will check for compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act and its regulations. They will focus on hazards that could endanger the health and safety of workers. Enforcement action, as appropriate, will be taken for any violations of the act and its regulations. [WCx]
 
 
Definition of Tower Crane
 
Under the Regulations for Construction Projects, a tower crane is a defined as a mechanical device or structure that is of the travelling, fixed or climbing type and that has a:
 
1.    boom, jib or both
2.    power-driven drum and wire rope to raise, lower or move material and
3.    vertical mast.
 
Used to erect high rise buildings, a tower crane can hoist and move material at great heights on construction sites.
 
 
Definition of Mobile Crane
 
A mobile crane is a mechanical device or structure that incorporates a boom that is
 
1.    capable of moving in the vertical and horizontal plane
2.    capable of raising, lowering or moving a load suspended from the boom by a hook or rope and
3.    mounted on a mobile base or chassis.
 
These cranes are designed to be easily transported to a site and used with different types of cargo and loads.
 
Crane Hazards
 
Hazards involving tower and mobile cranes can lead to catastrophic events. For example, if a poorly maintained tower crane collapses, workers on the construction site could be injured or killed. Even the public can be affected if a tower crane falls or drops a heavy load.
 
All cranes are:
 
     getting older
     exposed to the elements and weather extremes and
     subject to heavy use for extended periods making them prone to stress, fatigue and breakdown.
 
There have been a number of incidents involving serious injuries to workers, as well as some close calls, involving cranes in the past few years.
 
Between 2007 and 2011, one worker died and seven workers were seriously injured in incidents involving a tower crane or mobile crane at construction sites across Ontario, according to Ministry of Labour reports.
 
 
Injuries and Close Calls
 
Of the injury incidents, four were related to tower cranes and three were related to mobile cranes.
 
The injuries resulted from incidents such as a:
 
     tower crane striking scaffolding that caused a worker to fall
     worker being struck by a piece of material that was being hoisted 
     worker being pinned under a load that was being lowered to the ground [WCx]
 
Close calls (in which no one was injured) involved a:
 
     tower crane breaking into two
     tower crane tipping over
     Rigging failure
     uncontrolled descent of material that landed in a busy traffic intersection
 
Blitz Priorities
 
Inspectors are focusing on the following key priorities:
 
     Safe access and fall prevention:  Inspectors will check for the required presence and adequacy of access ladder and guard rails or other access equipment. They will also check for required fall arrest equipment to protect workers who may fall from tower cranes.
 
     Proximity to overhead energized power lines: inspectors will check if the operator maintains the minimum distance of approach from overhead energized power lines, if the voltage of such power lines has been identified and if a procedure is in place to maintain the minimum distance of the crane or its load from the overhead power lines.
 
     Tower crane maintenance and other records: Inspectors will check for records on the condition of the tower crane, before and after erection, including a professional engineer’s design drawings for tower crane installation. Inspectors will check that tower cranes were properly inspected prior to first use, and regularly inspected and maintained afterwards. Inspectors will also review log book entries to ensure operational functions, such as limit and overload limit switches, were properly tested.
 
     Mobile crane maintenance and other records: Inspectors will check for records such as the operator log book and operator manual. Inspectors will check that cranes were inspected and maintained as required.
 
     Training: Inspectors will check that mobile crane operators are certified to operate a crane at a construction site or are being instructed in crane operation and accompanied by a person who has the required certification.
 
     Various other issues:  Inspectors will check on the structural, mechanical and foundational integrity of cranes, safety system, setup, proximity to people and safe hoisting practices.

 

 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

WorkSafe Begins Phase 2 of Workplace Safety Program

 

 

Phase II of WorkSafeBC’s (British Columbia) combustible dust strategy began recently, and has been expanded to include similar wood processing operations where dust accumulation could be a safety hazard.

 

Until the end of the year, WorkSafeBC officers will be inspecting up to 280 B.C. employers registered in the wood and paper products sub-sectors. Inspections will focus on dust cleanup, ventilation, and dust control issues.

 

Wood processing and paper product operations have been selected because of their high risk of combustible dust explosion due to large amounts of dust produced or handled in these facilities,” said Betty Pirs, vice president, Prevention Services. “Like all WorkSafeBC inspections, orders will be issued to employers based on violations observed during the inspections.”

 

WorkSafeBC aims to complete the first round of inspections by late August, and will be following up with employers to ensure they are in compliance with the Workers Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Regulation in regard to combustible dust and potential safety hazards.

 

Phase two inspections will also include sawmill facilities inspected as part of Phase I, that are continuing to face challenges in maintaining compliance.

 

Phase I of the combustible dust strategy was initiated in April 2012 after wood dust was suspected as a factor in the explosions at Babine Forest Products in Burns Lake and Lakeland Mills in Prince George. These two sawmills exploded within three months of each other, killing four workers and seriously injuring dozens more.

 

On April 26, 2012, WorkSafeBC issued a directive order to the province’s 173 sawmills to conduct a full hazard identification, risk assessment, and safety review, with particular focus on combustible dust; dust accumulation; and potential ignition sources.

 

Since the directive order was issued, WorkSafeBC has been following up with employers to ensure the ordered actions have been taken and that sawmills are in compliance with the Workers Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Regulation with regard to combustible dust and potential safety hazards. The status of the inspections and compliance is posted on WorkSafeBCsWebsite.

 

 

<pAuthor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact:  mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

 
WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

New Zealand, Minnesota Looking to Boost Workplace Safety

 

New Zealand Workplace Health and Safety Receiving $37 Million Increase

 

New Zealand Workplace Health and Safety will receive a $37 million boost over the next four years, Labour Minister Kate Wilkinson recently announced. Wilkinson also has ordered a full review of the country’s health and safety system by an independent taskforce to ensure it is fit-for-purpose.

 

 

Too many New Zealanders are injured or killed at work. People have a right to know that when they leave for work in the morning, they will be coming home safe and well at the end of the day,” Wilkinson commented in remarks following the announcement. [WCx]

 

 

The extra funding will be used to increase the number of front-line health and safety inspectors, further fund the High Hazards Unit, support targeted health and safety initiatives, and develop ICT to improve data sharing and analysis.

 

 

This investment will bolster the health and safety inspectorate and support initiatives to help improve the culture of workplace safety in New Zealand.”  The number of inspectors will increase to 180 over three years – a 20 percent increase that will place New Zealand in line with Australia.

 

 

We have seen from the success of the High Hazards Unit the importance of having the right people on the ground working closely with businesses,” Wilkinson said. “I have set a target of a 25 percent reduction in workplace deaths and serious injuries by 2020. A strong and effective regulator is the cornerstone of any health and safety system, and this funding will help ensure this target is met.”

 

 

According to Wilkinson, the independent taskforce, once established, will be asked to report back by the end of the year with fresh ideas to improve the system. The Government willrespond separately to the Royal Commission of Inquiry into Pike River but any advice provided by the commission on wider health and safety issues will be considered as part of the review. [WCx]

 

 

We need to know whether our current health and safety system is fit-for-purpose and provides the right base to reduce workplace harm,” Wilkinson noted. “Our health and safety legislation is now 20 years old. This review is timely, particularly with the rebuild in Canterbury gearing up, and the Royal Commission due to report back in September.”

 

 

The additional funding is a result of contributions to the Health and Safety in Employment Levy.

 


Minnesota Congressman Seeks Answers on Mine Safety

 

 

Minnesota congressman John Kline (R) sent a letter the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) requesting an explanation as to why statistics indicate its workers are more likely to be injured on the job than miners and other industry workers according to the Associated Press.

 

 

In the letter, Kline noted U.S. Labor Department data shows MSHA had a rate of 5.69 injuries and illnesses per 100 employees during a five-year period, compared with a rate of 2.81 for the mining industry. Kline is seeking to have MSHA report on its plans to improve safety among its employees. [WCx]

 

 

MSHA has stated its “culture of prevention embeds safety and health as core values in all initiatives and ongoing activities,” Kline wrote in a letter to MSHA chief Joe Main. “However, it appears this core value is not being instilled in MSHA’s own safety and health initiatives.”

 

According to MSHA spokesman Jesse Lawder, the agency is reviewing Kline’s request. “MSHA takes the health and safety of its employees very seriously,” Lawder added.

 

Federal data indicates MSHA’s injury and illness rate decreased from 6.7 per 100 employees in 2008 to 5.2 last year (2011). But MSHA’s total injury and illness cases last year were approximately three times higher than the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, according to Kline.

 

In 2007, an MSHA inspector was among nine rescuers and miners who died in accidents 10 days apart at the Crandall Canyon mine in Utah. [WCx]

 

The purpose of the Mine Safety and Health Administration is to prevent death, disease, and injury from mining and to promote safe and healthful workplaces for the nation’s miners.

 

 

<pAuthor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Ohio Bureau of Workers Comp Awards $350,000 in Grants for Workplace Safety

 


The Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation (BWC) has awarded safety intervention grants to 16 Ohio employers totaling more than $350,000.
 
 
BWC designed the Safety Intervention Grant Program to assist Ohio employers in reducing illnesses and injuries, as well as to create a partnership with them to establish best practices for accident and injury prevention. [WCx]
 
 
"These grants can be very helpful to employers that want to create safer workplaces for their employees but are discouraged by the expense," said BWC Administrator/CEO Steve Buehrer. "They also help to establish best practices by allowing BWC to measure the effectiveness of each employer's safety interventions and advise other employers on how to contend with similar safety concerns."
 
 
Ohio private and public employers are eligible for the grants, which include a 2-to-1 matching amount up to a maximum of $40,000 for a total of $60,000 – $20,000 from the employer and $40,000 from BWC. Quarterly data reports and follow-up case studies help BWC determine the effectiveness of employers' safety interventions and establish best practices.
 
 
Grant Recipients 
 
 
City of Monroe (Butler County)
The city's Public Works Department is responsible for water and sewer maintenance for the city. BWC awarded $27,666.67 to purchase a hydro-excavation system and hydraulics trailer to reduce the ergonomic risk factors associated with manually exercising water/sewer system valves. Risk factors include repetitive motion, excessive force, and awkward postures, in addition to the hazards related to exposure to extreme weather and traffic conditions.
 
 
Mid State Restoration, Inc. (Cuyahoga County)
Mid State Restoration is a construction industry employer specializing in masonry restoration. BWC awarded $8,359.93 to purchase new dustless technology safety tools used in concrete finishing work, such as saws, grinders, hammer drills and vacuum systems. These tools will help reduce the risk of injury related to overexposures to silica and noise.
 
 
Buckeye Tire Co-Columbus Inc. (Franklin County)
Buckeye Tire is an automobile service facility that specializes in auto, light and heavy duty truck service and repairs. BWC awarded $28,315.80 to purchase a tire balancer with wheel lift and tire changer to reduce the risk of injury related to material handling, forceful exertions and awkward postures.
 
 
G.A.G. Inc. (Franklin County)
GAG Inc. is a landscape maintenance company. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase a mulch mule to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as strains/sprains, repetitive motion, slips/trips and falls, and exposure to vehicular traffic.
 
 
Archbold Refuse Service, Inc. (Fulton County)
A.R.S. is a waste hauling company for residential, commercial and industrial customers. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase hydraulic container lock systems to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling as yard containers are pushed/pulled to trucks and manually locked in place prior to dumping.
 
 
LICCO Industries, Inc. (Licking County)
Licco is a sheltered workshop serving the developmentally disabled population. BWC awarded $3,589.33 to purchase a new edge of dock plate, which includes a hydraulic 30,000 lb wall mounted control station to reduce the risk of slips/trips and falls, and injury to the upper extremities.
 
 
LifeCare Ambulance (Lorain County)
LifeCare is an emergency/non-emergency medical transportation provider. BWC awarded $30,792.37 to purchase a Power-LOAD system and three bariatric transport cots to reduce the risk of injury related to manual handling of patients as they are loaded and unloaded from emergency vehicles.
 
 
MacQueen Orchards (Lucas County)
MacQueen Orchards is a small family owned apple and peach orchard. BWC awarded $8,266.67 to purchase vented bins to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains/strains, in addition to cuts/lacerations from loose metal and nails protruding from wooden crates.
 
 
North Toledo Graphics (Lucas County)
North Toledo Graphics is a privately owned printing company that provides mailing and bindery service along with high quality web offset printing. BWC awarded $5,629.66 to purchase portable scissor lifts to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders related to manual material handling and repetitive bending and lifting.
 
 
M & M Wine Cellar (Mahoning County)
A service industry employer, M & M Wine Cellar is a small family-owned wine and restaurant business. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase an automated wine bottling system to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains/strains, cuts and lacerations, as well as the ergonomic risks associated with prolonged standing, repetitive motion, and grip force during the bottling process.
 
 
MLC Inc., dba Electro Polish Company (Montgomery County)
Electro Polish provides metal finishing service for the tool and die industry. BWC awarded $7,999.98 to purchase a power flight bar, trolley and catwalk to reduce the risk of injury related to material handling, awkward postures, forceful exertions and contact stress.
 
 
Gahm's Inc. (Scioto County)
Gahm's is an auto and truck dismantling and recycling center that performs towing, recovery and truck crane services. BWC awarded $15,376.76 to purchase a tire changer with retractable air reels to reduce or eliminate the risk of injury related to manual material handling, forceful exertions and awkward postures.
 
 
Countryside Veterinary Service, Inc. (Trumbull County)
BWC awarded $4,031.24 to purchase mobile examination/transport tables to reduce the risk of injury related to manual handling of animals for examination, such as sprains, strains and animal bites.
 
 
Marietta Ambulance Service, Ltd (Washington County)
BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase two power load systems for cots, to reduce the risk of injury related to manually lifting and loading patients into emergency vehicles.
 
 
Manufacturing Company, Inc. (Williams County)
Bard is a manufacturer of light commercial HVAC equipment. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase a powered conveyor system to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling as HVAC equipment, weighing between 100 -700 lbs, is manually pushed down assembly lines on gravity conveyor systems. [WCx]
 
 
Carey Exempted Village Schools (Wyandot County)
BWC awarded $10,386.67 to purchase lightweight tables to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains and strains to the hip, back and shoulders, in addition to pinch points as employees set-up and break down existing heavy weight tables.

 

 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

 


 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com
MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Small but Mighty New Zealand Taking Occupational Injuries Seriously

New Zealand Employer Fined after Serious Injuries to Workers
 
Two companies  from Taranaki, New Zealand  have been fined a total of $71,500 after an employee suffered serious injuries when the hired machine he was operating rolled down a slope, pinning him underneath.
 

According to details
from the Department of Labour, Taranaki Civil Construction Limited was fined $38,500 and ordered to pay $12,000 in reparation to its employee who suffered a compound fracture to his right arm and lacerations to his scalp and neck. (WCxKit)  Graham Harris (2000) Limited , the company that hired out the roller, was fined $33,000 and ordered to pay $4,000 in reparation for failing to ensure the roller was safe to use.
 

The New Plymouth
 District Court  heard that the company was working on a project in New Plymouth to improve flood defenses in February this year.  The employee was using a roller to compact clay at the top of the stop bank.
 

The roller that the company hired was not fit for the operation as it did not have a roll over protective structure or a seat belt,” says the Department of Labour’s Taranaki Service Manager Jo Pugh.
 “This type of machinery is not appropriate to use on top of a narrow stop bank of clay and it put this employee at serious risk of harm,” says Pugh.  
 

 
This accident could have been prevented had some basic safety steps been followed, saving this employee from a number of operations that were required due to his injuries.”

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 



WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

British Firm Contractor Fined For Worker Fall

A building firm and a contractor in North Yorkshire, Great Britain were recently fined after a worker was injured following a fall while working on the construction of a new farm building, according to a report from The Health and Safety Executive (HSE).
 
 
The 36-year-old worker, who asked not to be named, was employed by Stephen Ramsey, trading as Up & Cover, who had been subcontracted by Waddington Buildings Limited to carry out steel erection work and cladding on the building at Brierton North Farm, Billingham. Both Ramsey andWaddington Buildings Limited were prosecuted by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). (WCxKit)
 
 
Teesside Magistrates’ Court was told the worker was standing on a pallet fitted to a fork attachment of a tractor, which was lifted to heights of around four and a half meters to allow the worker to measure and fit guttering to the building. The court heard the tractor was being operated by Stephen Ramsey when it unexpectedly moved with the pallet in a raised position causing the worker to lose his balance and fall to the ground.
 
 
He spent 15 days in a hospital after his left heel was smashed and his right ankle was fractured and treatment is still ongoing.
 
 
HSE’s investigation revealed Ramsey failed to carry out the work safely and Waddington Buildings Limited had failed to establish whether work carried out on their behalf would be done safely and whether Stephen Ramsey was competent to do the work.
 
 
Stephen Ramsey, pleaded guilty to breaching the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and was fined £1,000 ($1,567) and ordered to pay £250 ($3920) costs. (WCxKit)
 
 
Waddington Buildings Limited, of Station Road, Brompton on Swale, pleaded guilty to one breach of Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and was fined £3,500 ($5,484) and ordered to pay costs of £900 ($1,410).

 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 

NEW 2012 WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

New Jersey Employer Fined $126,000 for Allowing Worker Hazards

New Jersey-based Supply Plus was recently cited with one willful, 25 serious and two other-than-serious safety violations in response to a complaint alleging imminent danger for failing to guard machines and exposing workers to fall and electrical hazards at the company's Paterson facility, according to an OSHA report. Proposed penalties total $126, 000.
 
 
An inspection revealed one willful violation, with a $42,000 penalty, for failing to provide machine guarding. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health. (WCxKit)
 
 
The serious violations, with $84,000 in penalties, include failing to keep work areas and passageways free of litter; provide guardrail protection, guard machines and electrical boxes; provide an eyewash station; provide personal protective equipment for workers handling chemicals; provide industrial truck and hazardous communication training; ensure exit routes were unobstructed and visibly marked; make sure exit doors could open properly; cover electrical panel boards supplying power for equipment and lighting; properly use flexible cords; implement a lockout/tagout program for energy sources to prevent machines from accidentally starting up during servicing and maintenance; perform workplace hazards assessment and develop a written hazardous communication program.

A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.
 
 
The other-than-serious violations, carrying no penalty, are due to record-keeping violations. An-other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm. (WCxKit)
 
 
"Each of these violations left workers vulnerable to hazards that could cause serious injuries or quite possibly death," said Lisa Levy, OSHA's area director in Hasbrouck Heights. "It's vital that Supply Plus correct these hazards to protect its workers."

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 

Our 2012 WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

10 Companies Awarded $207,000 to Support Workplace Safety

The Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation (BWC) reported recently awarding 10 businesses safety intervention grants totaling more than $207,000 to make Ohio workplaces safer.

 
BWC designed the Safety Intervention Grant Program to assist Ohio employers in reducing illness and injuries, and create a partnership with them to establish best practices for accident and injury prevention. (WCxKit)
 
 
Ohio private and public employers are eligible for the grants, which provide a 2-to-1 matching amount up to a maximum of $40,000 for a total of $60,000 and $20,000 from the employer and $40,000 from BWC. Quarterly data reports and follow-up case studies help BWC to determine the effectiveness of employers' safety interventions and establish best practices.
 
 
The businesses that received a grant are
 
Aluminum Line Products Co. (Cuyahoga County)
Aluminum Line is in the manufacturing industry and provides a line of aluminum and stainless custom coils, first stage blanks, punched blanks and components for the transportation industry. BWC awarded $11,668 to purchase a vacuum lift system to reduce or eliminate the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains/strains, in addition to slips/trips and falls.
 
 
Bral Land Corp (Trumbull County)
Bral Land Corp is a small machine shop, warehouse and inspection facility that sorts and reships machined products. BWC awarded $23,658 to purchase a pallet wrapper and air balancer to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains/strains and slips/trips and falls.
 
 
Gibbs Equipment, Inc. (Huron County)
This commercial industry employer sells and services lawn and farm equipment. BWC awarded $10,997 to purchase equipment lifts to reduce the risk of injury related to awkward postures, twisting and bending for extended periods due to the nature of tractor/mower repair work.
 
 
Harry & David Operations, Inc. (Licking County)
Harry & David is a leading gourmet gift company providing wholesale and distribution services. BWC awarded $18,789 to purchase 30 portable conveyors to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains/strains, in addition to cuts/lacerations.
 
 
Horizons Inc. (Cuyahoga County)
Horizons is in the manufacturing industry and assembles membrane switches for products such as CNC machines. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase an automated dome placement system to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders related to the manual assembly process of electrical switches.
 
 
Kelstin, Inc. (Richland County)
Kelstin is in the construction industry and provides various excavation and demolition services. BWC awarded $4,981 to purchase a skid steer mounted hydraulic breaker to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, excessive force, vibration and cumulative trauma disorders associated to excavation and demolition work.
 
 
The Nolan Company (Stark County)
Nolan Co. is a manufacturer of a variety of railroad safety handling products. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase a vertical machining center to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling, such as sprains/strains, cuts/lacerations, burns and eye injuries from flying debris.
 
 
The Village of Spencerville (Allen County)
This small public employer provides a wide range of maintenance and utility work for the village of Spencerville. BWC awarded $9,128 to purchase a hydraulic chain saw, hydraulic post driver and puller, manhole cover lift, lift magnet, manhole cover dolly, valve box lifter and wheel chock to reduce the risk of injury related to manual material handling while conducting maintenance and repairs for the village.
 
 
Village of West Liberty (Logan County)
This public employer provides water-meter-reading services for the village of West Liberty. BWC awarded $40,000 to purchase a wireless water-meter-reading system to reduce the risk of injury related to poor environmental conditions associated to reading water meters manually, such as sprains/strains, dog bites, slips/trips and falls, potential traffics risks and extreme weather conditions. (WCxKit)
 
 
Volunteer Firemen of Magnolia, Inc. (Stark County)
This organization is an incorporated fire department that provides fire protection and emergency response to surrounding communities. BWC awarded $8,347 to purchase a thermal imaging camera (TIC) to reduce the risk of injury related to fighting fires by detecting potential hot spots and/or locating a fire source allowing crews to extinguish the fire more rapidly.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 
2012 WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT GUIDEBOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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