First Report of Injury Accuracy Critical for Workers Comp Success

Delegating First Report of Injury Can Create Problems

 

Risk managers and workers’ compensation managers normally delegate the job of filling out the First Report of Injury form (also known in some states as the Employer’s First Report). Delegation of the First Report of Injury to someone who is not extremely careful create numerous problems. All the information on the First Report of Injury needs to be checked carefully before it is submitted to the claims office and to the state Workers’ Compensation Commission / Department of Labor / Industrial Commission / etc. For this article we will use Workers’ Compensation Commission (WCC) for all the states.

 

The First Report of Injury form is usually given the number 1 in most states, whether it is known as the WC-1, DWC-1, or other nomenclature. The reason the form is given numeral 1 is because normally it is the first form for both the WCC and the claims office. The information and data used by both the WCC and the claims office in setting up their files is taken from the First Report of Injury. Little errors on the First Report of Injury are copied and can create havoc.

 

 

Ensure Important Details are Correct

 

Name Spelled Correctly

The spelling of the employee’s name should be checked. If the last name is misspelled by the employer’s representative completing the First Report of Injury, the WCC will copy it verbatim. When the WCC receives medical information or other state forms which they are unable to match to an existing claim, the WCC will inquire as to why the claim has not been reported, as they could not find the work comp claim in their database.

 

 

 

Correct Social Security Number

An employer should never submit a First Report of Injury without the correct social security number (SS#). Too often when the SS# is not readily available, the employer’s representative will use a fake SS# such as 123-45-6789 or 000-00-0000 or 999-99-9999. This may get the First Report of Injury off the desk of the employer’s representative, but it creates issues for the employer, the WCC and the claims office. For the employer, it can mess up your loss run accuracy. The WCC will being call the employer and/or the claims office for the correct SS#. The claims office can submit the Insurance Services Office (ISO) inquiry with the fake SS#, but the likelihood of identifying previous insurance claims by the injured employee is greatly reduced when the SS# is not accurate.

 

 

Correct Date of Injury

When the date of injury is incorrect problems occur. In most workers’ compensation claims, the date of injury is also the date of the first medical treatment. Most claim management computer systems are programmed to kick out medical bills that occur before the date of injury. For example: an incorrect date of injury of 3-3-13 is entered on the First Report of Injury while the correct date of injury is 3-2-13. The medical bills from 3-2-13 will get denied because, to the computer system, they occurred before the date of injury. This results in phone calls from the medical provider(s) and the claims office trying to determine the correct date of injury.

 

 

Proper Wage Information

When the wage information on the First Report of Injury is incorrect, it will create problems, especially if the employee is represented by an attorney. Too often the employer’s representative will take the easy way out rather than contacting the payroll department for the correct wage information. When the employer’s representative completes the First Report of Injury reflecting the employee works 5 days a week, 8 hours per day, at the standard hourly rate for the work the employee normally does, without verifying with the payroll department, problems arise. For example, on a 40 hour week with a position that pays $10.00 per hour, $400.00 is entered as the weekly wage. But in reality, work has been slow; the employee has been absent a lot and has only averaged 32 hours per week. In this situation, the employee’s attorney often will request a hearing trying to compel the payment of disability benefits based on the higher payroll information entered on the First Report of Injury. This will force the claims adjuster to spent time and legal fees proving the correct earnings information.

 

 

Proper Type of Injury & Body Part Affected

The importance of properly entering on the First Report of Injury the type of injury and the body part affected cannot be overstated. One of the first things an attorney for the employee will do is check the First Report of Injury for the type of injury and the body part. If this information is missing, your represented employee’s injuries will expand dramatically. Neck and back injuries that you did not know the employee had on the date of injury will suddenly appear. The employee’s pre-existing medical problems will be severely aggravated. The additional medical treatment and extended time off work can be very costly when the type of injury and body part is not completed properly.

 

 

Double Check First Report of Injury Prior to Submission

Any incorrect or incomplete information on the First Report of Injury can result in problems. A lot of the problems created by wrong information can be corrected with a few phone calls or the resubmission of the First Report of Injury with the correct information. However, this is a waste of time for all the parties involved. Plus, when the First Report of Injury is inaccurate or incomplete, it can often be exploited by the employee’s attorney. To make the job easier for everyone related to the workers’ compensation claim, be sure your representative who completes the First Report of Injury checks it twice to be sure it is totally accurate.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2013 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

The Role of the Risk Manager in Workers Compensation Cost Containment

 

What is the Role of a Risk Manager?

 

A risk manager is responsible for a broad array of duties as the company sets up a workers’ compensation management program. To reduce costs, the risk manager should closely monitor the implementation of the program. Naturally, the responsibilities depend on the size of the department and amount of assistance that is provided.

 

Tips on What a Risk Manager Should Do:

 

  1. Determine the type of claims administrationarrangement. The risk manager needs to determine whether the type of claims administration you have is the right fit for your company and not take a one-size-fits all approach. The risk manager should perform an individualized assessment of your company’s strengths and needs to determine what arrangement works best for you.

 

  1. Ensure the adjuster-to-claim ratio is appropriatefor adjusters responding to your claims to get your workers back to productive employment faster. The risk manager needs to determine whether the adjuster has too many claims to process yours fast enough to keep your costs down.

 

  1. Consider whether your claims volume requires dedicated staff. The risk manager should assess whether the amount of workers’ compensation claims the company has requires one or more employees whose primary job function is to handle the workers’ compensation claims process.

 

  1. Follow claims administration’s best practicesto better comprehend the adjuster’s role. The risk manager should be up-to-date on the insurance industry’s standards and recommendations in claims handling to assess whether your procedures need to be updated.

 

  1. Make sure claims handling personnel are trained in injury managementconcepts so they can grasp the issues affecting your claims. The risk manager should make sure that personnel are familiar with the expected claims process, forms, medical terms, action plan, and potential issues. As your first-line defense, you want your claims handling personnel informed enough to spot issues that may arise.

 

  1. Visit an adjuster claims handling locationto see how your adjuster handles your files and view their claims operations first hand. There is no substitute for knowing exactly how your claim is being handled in the physical location where it is being processed.

 

  1. Attend associate seminars and meet with other industriesto observe how other organizations address workers’ compensation issues in today’s labor market.

 

  1. Maintain benchmarks for your professionshowing how potential savings generated by an effective injury management program far outweigh the initial costs of staffing.

 

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

TPA and Insurance Carrier Roles For Dummies

If you think all the claims people are located in the claims office, you would be in the large majority of the risk and insurance world, and you would be wrong. There are various types of claims people in support and management roles at the insurers and the third party administrators (TPA) who have a major impact on the success of your workers’ compensation program. Here is a brief synopsis of the other claims people you may never hear about.

 

Account Administrator/Risk Technical Adviser

This position was previously known as the “home office examiner,” but insurance companies and TPAs have renamed the claims position in several different ways. In some companies it will still be referred to as the “home office examiner,” but other names like “account administrator” and “risk technical adviser” are being used to describe the position.

 

The home office examiner/account administrator/risk technical adviser is a person with a tremendous amount of claims knowledge, claims experience and “know how” who oversees the catastrophic injury claims — the more difficult and expensive claims. The home office examiner’s role is to be a “second set of eyes” on the file. The home office examiner will review the catastrophic injury claims to be sure the medical management, disability management and resolution of the file is handled in the best interest of the insured and the insurance company. (WCxKitz)

 

The home office examiner will provide direction and supervision whenever the claims office asks for guidance. The home office examiner will also intervene if the course of the claim is not what it should be. At TPA’s this role will also encompass verifying the claim offices are complying with all the requirements of the client.

 

Account Manager

The account manager for the insurance company, or the TPA, is a hybrid role between a claims person and a salesperson. The account manager acts as a liaison between the employer, the insurer and the TPA, when a TPA is handling the claims.

 

Often the account manager is a direct contact for the employer’s risk manager or claims coordinator with the intent of resolving all insurance program related problems and answering all questions about the insurance program. The account manager is the go-to person to resolve any issues that arise whether it is compliance by the claims office with the service standards, the deletion or adding of new locations to the insurance program, the resolution of questions about the program or the corrections of any errors or mistakes in the data management.

 

Nurse Case Manager

The role of the nurse case manager is to provide medical expertise beyond the knowledge the adjuster will acquire from reviewing medical reports and medical histories. The nurse case manager is a license practical nurse or a registered nurse who has the nursing degree plus years of experience in the medical field. (WCxKitz)

 

When the nature of the injury is severe and the adjuster wants medical management of the claim to be provided, the nurse case manager is assigned to the claim file. The nurse case manager will coordinate and facilitate the health care services provided to the injured employee to assist the employee in achieving the best recovery possible.

 

The nurse case manager will provide to the adjuster a patient assessment and a treatment plan that has been coordinated with the medical provider. The implementation of the treatment plan and the execution of the treatment plan are part of the nurse case manager‘s responsibilities.

 

Not only is the nurse case manager an adviser to the adjuster but also a trained medical expert who can answer the medical questions the injured employee may have between medical provider visits.

 

Adjuster-in-charge

The adjuster-in-charge, also known as a “resident adjuster,” is often used when a large employer wants an on-site adjuster to handle their workers’ comp claims. This facilitates the immediate reporting and the immediate investigation and handling of each new injury claim. The adjuster-in-charge is an employee of the insurer or TPA, but is domiciled at the employer’s location or in a one-person office near the employer.

 

The adjuster-in-charge will be an experienced adjuster who is capable of working independently from an on-site supervisor. The workload of an adjuster-in-charge will normally include a mix bag of simple workers’ comp claims to the most severe claims. The position often entails the adjuster having to do everything from taking in the new assignments to the closing of the claim files. (WCxKitz)

 

Regional Manager

When an insurer or TPA has a large number of claims offices, the supervision of those claims office is often broken down into regions of the country. The regional manager is responsible for the services provided by the claims offices in the territory or region.   The regional manager provides the direction to the claims offices and provides the home office management with a greater degree of control.

 

Vice President of Claim

At the top of the claims hierarchy is the vice president of claims. The responsibilities of the vice president of claims includes the planning, organizing, directing and controlling of all the activities of the claims offices and claims regions. The vice president of claims is also responsible for the performance of the claims offices, the profitability of the claims offices and the claim services provided. (WCxKitz)

 

Summary

The various support roles outside of the workers’ comp claims office are often the keys to the success of the claims program. Whether it is the claims examiner keeping the high dollar files on track, the account manager resolving all the issues that come up, the nurse case manager providing the necessary medical expertise or the senior management overseeing the claims program, they all can have a positive influence on making your workers’ comp insurance program successful.

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, J.D, President, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers’ Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact:  RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com .

WC Calculator:  http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers’ comp issues.


©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

9 Ways to Spot When A Workers Comp Claim Is Going Bad

As the Risk Manager of your company you feel most of your claims are well handled by the third party administrator, but from time to get you get some nasty surprises in the way of huge jumps in the reserves or settlement request far above what you expected. It is normal to wonder what went wrong and why didn't anyone see this coming.
 
While you cannot eliminate every nasty surprise, if your workers' compensation claims coordinator and your designated adjuster/dedicated adjusters are conscientious about their work, they can recognize most potentially bad claims before they become a nasty surprise. With nearly 100 years of workers’ comp claim history, adjusters should recognize certain situations are like a storm on the horizon —  trouble is brewing. 
 
Some of the issues within the claim file where your workers’ comp claims coordinator and the adjuster must take immediate and highly aggressive action to control the claim include:
  1. A delay of more than two weeks between the date of injury and the date the injury is reported to the employer.   This can be a claim where the employee tried “to tough it out”, but often it is an injury that occurred away from work. A detailed recorded statement should be obtained from both the employee and the employee's supervisor in regards to the facts of the claim. A medical authorization should be obtained from the employee and medical records obtained from both the employee's personal doctor and the workers’ comp doctor. Both the claims coordinator and the adjuster need to closely scrutinize the medical reports before accepting this claim. 
  2. A history of previous injuries to the same affected body part, especially spinal injuries. The employee may have re-injured himself while doing household chores or some other non-work related activity. A medical authorization, recorded statements and a review of the personal and workers’ comp medical history should be accomplished before accepting the claim.
     
  3. An injury that occurs the first day on the new job. It could be the new employee is a klutz or really, really unlucky. Most often, especially for musculoskeletal injury claims, the employee joined your company for the sole purpose of having someone to pay for the medical care she already needed. Again, a detailed investigation into the facts and the medical history of the employee is required.
     
  4. The employee is unhappy with the medical care provided by the doctor(s) and keeps changing doctors. Doctor shopping is almost always either (a) an effort to find a doctor who will keep the employee off work, or (b) an effort to find a doctor who will prescribe the pain medications the employee wants. Either way an aggressive early return to work program is necessary. The employer and the adjuster need to be talking to whoever the current doctor is and describing the light duty job(s) available to the employee. Also, if needed, a nurse case manager should be assigned to control the medications being prescribed.
     
  5. The employee early in the claim — before the doctor has placed him/her at maximum medical improvement –inquires as to what type of settlement s/he will receive. This is a red flag  that should put both the adjuster and the employer on edge. It is a clear indicator the employee's interest is to maximize the settlement, not to recover and return to work. This is another situation where the adjuster and the employer should be working with the doctor to return the employee to a light duty job. Also, a nurse case manager should be involved in the medical care as the employee is probably magnifying his symptoms in an effort to maximize his settlement.
     
  6. The employee has a true, undisputed injury but begins to over utilize pain medications. The employee took one pain pill and it only helped some. He took two pain pills together and felt great. He took three pain pills together and experienced a trip he had never been on before. It is absolutely essential in a situation like this to have a nurse case manager to work with the treating doctors to make sure the employee is not duplicating his pain medications by using multiple doctors. The nurse case manager can also prevent the refill of prescriptions before the prior allotment should run out.
     
  7. The employee works in a state allowing her to select her own doctor and  selects a doctor known to be “pro-plaintiff” or “pro-surgery.”   This is a difficult one. The adjuster should place an aggressive nurse case manager on the claim right away. The nurse case manager should request a second opinion prior to any surgery. The adjuster should review the state statutes on when and how many independent medical examinations can be had, and use them judiciously. The adjuster, the employer, and the nurse case manager should be encouraging a modified duty or light duty return to work for the employee.
  8. The employee is within two years of the retirement age. The employee enjoys his time off work and begins to think this is what retirement will be like. The workers’ comp weekly indemnity benefit is greater than what the retirement pension and/or social security will pay. A light duty program is essential in a case like this. The nurse case manager can work with the doctor to get the employee released to return to work as quickly as possible. The sooner the older employee is back at work, the less likely the employee is to start comparing disability leave with retirement.
     
  9. The employee has recovered enough that the medical care amounts only to a once a month or less frequent visit to the doctor. This often happens when the adjuster has the file on a long diary and is not actively monitoring the claim. When the employee gets to the point of monthly visits, and is not already back at work, the adjuster should be inquiring with the doctor as to when the employee will be released to light duty or modified duty. If the doctor is reluctant to release the employee to return to work, the adjuster should inquire as to why. An independent medical examination may be needed to compel the employee to return to work if the treating doctor will not release the employee to work.   (workersxzcompxzkit)

There other file situations the experienced adjuster should recognize and take steps to control before the claim gets out of hand. If your company has experienced more than its share of claims going bad, please contact us. We will be glad to arrange a file consultant to review your files and identify those that need extra attention before they get out of hand. 

  \
Author Robert Elliott,
executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers’ Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, manufacturing, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact him: 
Robert_Elliott@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com   or 860-553-6604.

FREE WC IQ Test:
http://www.workerscompkit.com/intro/
WC Books:
http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/workers-comp-books-manuals.php
WC Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/calculator.php
TD Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers' comp issues.

©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

Massachusetts Workers Compensation Cost Per Lost Time Claims Higher

A new report  from the shows Massachusetts had a moderate increase in 2007 after years of rapid growth in workers’ compensation costs per claim with more than seven days of lost time for medical care of injured workers.  

CompScope™ Medical Benchmarks
 a new study from WCRI (Workers’ Compensation Research Institute)  will analyze the components underlying the growth in medical cost per claim showing indemnity costs per claim with more than seven days of lost time were stable in 2007 due to the offsetting effects of stable duration of temporary disability and moderate growth in the average weekly wage. Also, medical cost containment expenses per claim grew rapidly in 2007 after stabilization in 2006.

In Massachusetts
, WCRI reported,  medical costs per claim with more than seven days lost time at an average 36 months of experience in Massachusetts were the smallest of the 15 study states. A previous WCRI study showed a key component for the lowest medical costs per claim in Massachusetts was reduced prices paid for nonsurgical services, due to the lowest nonhospital provider fee schedule of 42 study states.

However
,  surgery prices were often negotiated higher than the fee schedule rates in place at the time of the study. Effective April 1, 2009, the workers’ comp fee schedule in Massachusetts increased for most common workers’ compensation surgical procedures to reflect the average rates currently paid.

Indemnity benefits
 per claim with more than seven days of lost time at an average of 36 months maturity in Massachusetts were typical of the 15 study states. According to WCRI, this was due to the offsetting effects of a slightly lower weekly temporary disability benefit rate (60% of workers’ gross pre-injury wage compared to the typical 66.66% in most other states) and higher temporary disability duration due to the wage-loss benefit structure.

Benefit delivery
 expenses per claim with more than seven days of lost time and expenses in Massachusetts were 24% lower than the 15-state median. Most expense components in Massachusetts were lower than typical, WCRI reported. Medical cost containment expenses per claim were 34% below the median state. Furthermore, both the average defense attorney payment per claim and medical-legal expenses per claim was 25% lower than the median state. (workersxzcompxzkit)

WCRI also reported
  injured workers received their first indemnity payments faster in Massachusetts than in other study states, driven by the fastest speed of payment once the payer received notice of an injury.

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers' Compensation costs, including airlines, health care, manufacturing, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He can be contacted at: Robert_Elliott@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.


Podcast/Webcast: Claim Handling Strategies
Click Here
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Visit Our Websites: Reduce Your Workers Comp: www.ReduceYourWorkersComp.com/

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers' comp issues.
 
©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

What Risk Managers Need to Know about Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

What Risk Managers Need to Know About Drug and Alcohol Testing Programs

Drug and Alcohol  screening is one of the most common risk management weapons in the arsenal of tools to contain workers comp costs; the goal is to hire employees who are capable of performing the job they are hired to do and to prevent losses where you can.

 

Among the tools  used are drug, alcohol and impairment testing that affect job performance. Medical evaluation programs often include such testing. Pre-employment screening of various types helps employers avoid hiring those who cannot safely perform the functions of the job. And, it also reduces costs because in twelve states, workers’ comp insurance premiums are discounted for companies with substance abuse policies and in 15 states presumption of intoxication and/or cause can avoid paying a claim.

 

In the workers’  comp risk management arena there are 4 types of drug and alcohol screening: pre-placement screening, reasonable suspicion or for cause, post accident testing and random testing.

 

There are several  types of polices we recommend employers institute, among these is a Company Medical Policy or Substance Abuse Policy. Like all policies, the terms of the policy will need to be customized to comply with corporate culture considerations and with various state and federal laws. Both the Company Medical Policy and the Substance Abuse Policy can refer to drug and/or alcohol screening.

 

The policy  should include what type of drugs the applicants or employees will be tested. Some model policy requires testing for marijuana and cocaine, but with the increased use of prescription drugs companies may also want to test of amphetamines, opiates and phencyclidine (PCP).

 

Consider  the scope of testing, who will be tested. The prime candidates are safety-sensitive workers, such as those who drive or operate machinery on public roads, employees engaged in hazardous duty or those working with radioactive or explosive materials, medicines or firearms. Essentially, any employee whose job affects health and safety.

 

It is probably  easiest to start a program with new hires rather than existing employees especially if a company does not have an existing program.  All prospective employees who have been offered employment are required to take a drug test. If the individual’s test results are positive, he will not be considered for employment.

 

The policy  should be communicated to all employees as part of an employee awareness and education program duty at the company. Some states require proof that each employee has been given a copy of the policy, so each employee should sign an acknowledgement that they have received the policy. Educating employees about the severity of the drug and alcohol problem is also important and in some states required.

 

The  type of testing to be done will include considering state law, as well as the cost and facilities needed for testing. For example, hair sample testing is more discreet and easier to collect samples, but is not allowed in some states. It is also more expensive and provides results for a longer duration of time – time that did not affect work performance.

 

Consider  why you want to have a drug testing program. For example, I had a company contact me to begin a drug testing program because they had a fork-lift driver who had repeat accidents, including running off a ramp and running into a warehouse support pole. I suggested that perhaps the accidents were due to eyesight problems, but because the employee wore Grateful Dead t-shirts, the assumption was he was using drugs. In fact, the issue turned out to be eye-sight related.

 

Disciplinary Guidelines:  In most states, there are no limits on the type of discipline imposed.  However there are six (6) states and Puerto Rico that limit the type of discipline that an employer may impose on employees who test positive.

 

Employee Assistance Programs:  In some states like Maine and Vermont an employer wishing to conduct workplace drug or alcohol testing must have an EAP.  Many other states offering benefits also require at least some form of local EAP resource file to be maintained.  (workersxzcompxzkit)

 

Overall, while implementing  a workplace drug and alcohol testing program may seem detailed, especially for multi-state employers, the benefits far outweigh these up-front details. It has been estimated that 38% to 50% of all work comp claims involve a drug or alcohol issue.  This being the case, a well-designed drug and alcohol program can help combat this reality and return hard earned dollars to the bottom line.

 

For the drug test laws in your state visit   http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/drug-testing-state-laws.php

 

Authors: William Judge and Rebecca Shafer William Judge, J.D.  is an attorney who, for the past 24 years, has concentrated his practice on legal issues related to substance abuse in the workplace and in our nation’s schools. Mr. Judge provides risk management assessments, legal and consulting assistance and develops drug-testing policies for schools, employers and labor/management committees. He is the co-founder of the Center for Intoxication Defense Management, www.dtstatelaws.com that assists employers in defeating work comp claims when the worker was intoxicated. He can be reached at bjudge@lawsinhand.com or 708-334-8010.

 

Rebecca Shafer, J.D.,  President Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc., Ms. Shafer is a graduate of Franklin Pierce Law Center and is licensed to practice law in CT and NH. For 25 years, she has been helping employers reduce workers’ compensation costs. Recently she developed Workers Comp Kit, a web-based cost containment program and is the publisher of www.ReduceYourWorkersComp.com, a resource website for employers with workers’ compensation problems. She can be reached at RShaferB@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

Take Our Free WC IQ Test: http://www.workerscompkit.com/intro/

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workman’s comp issues.

 

©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com   860-786-8286.or

 

The Role of the Risk Manager in Workers Compensation Cost Containment

A risk manager is responsible for a broad array of duties as the company sets up a workers’ compensation  management program. To reduce costs, the risk manager should see his role as closely monitoring the implementation of the program. Naturally, the responsibilities depend on the size of the department and amount of assistance that is provided.
Tips on what  a risk manager should do:
1. Determine what type of claims administration arrangement the company has.
2. Ensure the adjuster-to-claim ratio is appropriate for adjusters responding to your claims to get your workers back to productive employment faster.
3. Consider whether claims volume requires dedicated staff.
4. Familiarize yourself with claims administration’s best practices to better comprehend the adjuster’s role.
5. Make sure claims handling personnel are trained in injury management concepts so they can grasp the issues affecting your claims
6. Visit an adjuster claims handling location to see how your adjuster (workersxzcompxzkit)
handles your files and view their claims operations first hand.
7. Attend associate seminars and meet with other industries to observe how other organizations address workers’ compensation issues in today’s labor market.
8.Maintain benchmarks  for your profession showing how potential savings generated by an effective injury management program far outweigh the initial costs of staffing.

Author:  Robert Elliott, J.D.
Try the WC Cost Calculator to show the REAL COST of work comp.
Look at WC 101 for the basics about workers comp.
Workers’ Comp Kit® is a web-based online Assessment, Benchmarking and Cost Containment system for employers. It provides all the materials needed to reduce your costs significantly in 85% less time than if you designed a program from scratch.
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws are different. Consult with your corporate legal counsel before implementing any cost containment programs.
©2008 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

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