Canada Workers Awarded 4 Million Dollars In Workers Comp Appeal

 

901 People In Line to be Repaid $4 Million
 
New Brunswick's (Canada) workers compensation board has been ordered to repay close to $4 million to 901 people due to a court ruling that decided it was wrong to claw back injury benefit payments from Canada Pension Plan recipients.
 
 
Cases Date Back More Than 20 Years
 
According to The Canadian Press, the claims, which date back more than 20 years, were identified following a provincial Court of Appeal decision in April, a spokeswoman for WorkSafeNB noted.
 
Mary Tucker indicated the Crown agency believed its policy of clawing back workers compensation payments from people receiving the Canada Pension Plan was in step with the Workers Compensation Act.
 
“The implications of the Court of Appeal decision have been assessed and case management staff are actively working to implement the directions given by the court and provide redress to those affected,'' Tucker stated in an email. “Many have already received payments and others are in process.'”
 
 
WorkSafeNB’s Intrepretation of the Act Overturned
 
An appeals tribunal repeatedly turned away WorkSafeNB's interpretation of the Act and overturned its decisions in individual cases.
 
The Court of Appeal stood by the tribunal's position, claiming in its ruling that it “has been right all along.”
 
Tucker would not detail why WorkSafeNB followed the tribunal’s decisions in individual cases, but did not alter its overall policy of clawing back workers comp payments.
 
 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Canada Gives Employers Tools to Reduce Risk of Workplace Domestic Violence

WorkSafeBC (British Columbia) recently reported it would be releasing resources to help employers and workers reduce the risk of domestic violence entering the workplace.

 
 
The Domestic Violence in the Workplace Tool Kit is available online at no cost and provides advice on how to recognize the signs that workers may be affected by domestic violence. It has information about employers’ legal obligations, and it also contains recommendations and strategies to help avoid situations where domestic violence could affect the safety of workers and the workplace.
The tool kit consists of a handbook, factsheets, posters and other printable materials, as well as instructional videos. All of the resources can be found at: www.worksafebc.com/domesticviolence. [WCx]
 
 
“We know domestic violence does not disappear when people go to work,” said Margaret MacDiarmid, minister of Labour, Citizens’ Services and Open Government. “Employers have a responsibility to protect their workers from threats or acts of violence – whether it originates in the workplace or follows them to their workplace from home. This tool kit will give employers essential information and tools to help them identify and handle potential hazards that may arise from aggravated domestic situations.”
 
 
“The Domestic Violence in the Workplace Tool Kit will help employers develop safety plans for their worksites,” says WorkSafeBC senior vice-president of Human Resources and Corporate Services Roberta Ellis. “Understanding that a worker may be in trouble and may need support, as well as understanding existing obligations under the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation can help address risks of violence in the workplace.”
 
 
“It’s critical for people to recognize the signs of domestic violence early so that support systems can be put in place and victims can be protected from further violence,” added Detective Constable Michele McKnight of the Vancouver Police Domestic Violence and Criminal Harassment Unit. “This tool kit will hopefully not only raise awareness amongst workers but empower employers with the knowledge and comfort that they can play a role in keeping people safe from domestic violence.”
 
 
Allen Sawkins, whose partner Tony McNaughton was killed while intervening in a domestic violence incident at his workplace in January 2000, says he’s pleased employers now have more resources. “It’s vital that employers use everything that’s available,” Sawkins remarked. “Everybody deserves to be safe when they’re at work.”
 
 
WorkSafeBC created the tool kit in response to a May 2010 BC Coroners Service report entitled: Findings and Recommendations of the Domestic Violence Death Review Panel. WorkSafeBC developed the tool kit in consultation with employers, scholars, police officers, and related non-profit organizations. It draws from existing workplace safety legislation in the Workers Compensation Act and the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation.
 
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

rxbuywithoutprescriptiononline.net/zithromax.html
buywithoutprescriptiononlinerx.com/amitriptyline.html
noprescriptionrxbuyonline.com/levitra_plus.html

Board Approves Safety Amendments for Late Night Retail Workers

WorkSafeBC’s Board of Directors reports it has approved amendments to Part 4 of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation, regarding a third option to protect workers assigned to work alone in late night retail premises. The amendments become effective April 15, 2012.
 
 
The third option addresses implementation issues and challenges with the existing regulation.  The implementation issues were confirmed in three pilot projects and by an independent evaluation.  The conclusions were that options one and two in the current regulatory requirement — hiring additional workers or erecting a barrier — are not practicable for all late night retailers. [WCx]
 
 
This third option does not replace the existing two options in the late night retail safety regulation; it is an additional option, which provides a prescriptive list of engineering and administrative controls. Employers who choose the third option will be required to implement all of the listed controls.  In addition, employers will be required to undertake regular security audits by a qualified and independent person to confirm that all the controls have been implemented.
 
 
Roberta Ellis, senior vice president of Corporate Affairs for WorkSafeBC says, “Our priority continues to be protecting late night retail workers from acts of violence.”
 
 
WorkSafeBC consulted with employers and worker representatives when considering the amendments to the regulation. A review of independent research, the results of the pilot project assessing barrier options, a report from an independent audit of the project and feedback from public hearings throughout B.C. were also considered.
 
 
If an employer chooses the third option, they must implement all of the following controls:
 
 
A time lock safe on the premises that cannot be opened during late night hours;
 
Cash and lottery tickets that are not reasonably required in order to operate during late night hours are stored in the time lock safe;
 
 
Good visibility into and out of the premises;
 
Limited access to the inside of the premises;
 
The premises must be monitored by video surveillance;
 
 
There must be signs on the premises indicating that the safe is a time lock safe that cannot be opened during late night hours, there is a limited amount of accessible cash and lottery tickets on the premises, and the premises are monitored by video surveillance. (WCxKit)
 
 
In addition, workers assigned under the third option to work late night hours must be at least 19 years of age and be provided with personal emergency transmitters that are monitored by the employer, a security company, or other person designated by the employer.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

British Columbia Gas and Dash Laws for Workers Changing

WorkSafeBC is changing British Columbia's gas-and-dash laws after businesses complained some of the regulations to protect late-night workers were not feasible.
 
 
According to information from The Canadian Press WorkSafeBC spokeswoman Roberta Ellis said employers now have a third option to protect workers that doesn't include hiring more employees or erecting barriers. (WCxKit)
 
 
Ellis denied the changes are watering down what's become known as Grant's Law, which was brought in after gas station attendant Grant DePatie was dragged to death in a gas-and-dash in March 2005
 
 
According to Ellis, the pre-pay gas policy remains, but employers now have the option of taking other safety measures to avoid hiring additional staff or erecting cage-like barriers in late-night stores.
 
 
But if employers include the third option, which involves eight safety controls, they are obligated to implement each one and can't pick and choose among them, Ellis said.
 
 
The third option steps are: installing a time-lock safe that can't be opened during late night hours, storing most cash and lottery tickets in the time-lock safe, ensuring good visibility inside and outside of store, limiting access to inside of store, monitoring business by video surveillance and erecting signs advising that the safe can't be opened, that there is limited cash and lottery tickets on sight and that the store is monitored by video.
 
 
The third option also requires that late-night employees must be at least 19 years old and provided with emergency transmitters monitored by the employer, a security company or another person designated by the employers.
 
 
The amendments become effective on April 15, 2012.
 
 
The Western Canadian Convenience Store Association, representing 2,400 stores with 25,000 employees, released a statement backing the amendments. (WCxKit)
 
 
B.C. Federation of Labour president Jim Sinclair noted pressure from the business lobby prompted WorkSafeBC to change some of the best worker-protection regulations in North America.
 
 
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

British Columbia Delegates Meet to Form Workplace Safety Strategy

More than 300 local government delegates from across B.C. met in Vancouver recently to share strategies and reaffirm their commitment to protecting workers from occupational injury, disease, and death, according to a report from WorkSafeBC.
 
 
The 2011 BC Municipal Occupational Health and Safety Conference provided a forum for governments, municipalities, school boards, and other public sector agencies to exchange success stories about improving health and safety in the workplace through a series of presentations, workshops, and panel discussions. The BC Municipal Safety Association (BCMSA), CUPE BC, and WorkSafeBC sponsored the conference. (WCxKit)
 
 
These discussions affect a significant portion of Vancouver’s working public. Approximately 513 employers, responsible for the occupational health and safety of more than 39,800 workers, are registered with WorkSafeBC’s local government sector. Between 2006 and 2010, this sector experienced a 20 percent decrease in workplace injuries. Yet, despite the encouraging news, WorkSafeBC accepted more than 9,100 injury claims — 2,200 of which were labeled serious injuries — during the same time period. 
 
 
Public sector workers are exposed to a wide variety of hazards,” says Cathy Cook, conference chairperson and executive director of the BCMSA. “We have put together these sessions to help employers, supervisors, and workers be aware of the hazards and provide them with some real-life solutions to improve their safety.”
 
 
The BC Municipal Safety Association is a non-profit society that provides a common focal point for occupational health and safety concerns in the municipal environment. Its purpose is to identify and address these concerns, and to create learning opportunities for its members. All employers in the local government and related operations classification unit are members of the BCMSA. (WCxKit)
 
 
BCMSA’s increased safety training throughout the province, their enhanced Web site, e-newsletter, and overall engagement in the municipal sector on safety matters is making a difference,” says Ed Dowling, general industries manager for WorkSafeBC’s Industry and Labour Services. “The feedback from past conferences is outstanding. Employers, supervisors, and employee representatives are returning to their worksites as safety champions. We see a compounding effect — demonstrated by a 20 percent decrease in injuries since 2006.”
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Manage Your Workers Compensation: Reduce Costs 20-50%.  Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact

What are Working Alone Rules in Saskatchewan

The killing of a convenience store employee in Saskatchewan in June has spurred the provincial labor federation to support a petition to change regulations for retail employees working alone, according to a report from the Canadian OH&S News.
 
 
Many delegates attending the Saskatchewan Federation of Labour's (SFL) annual Occupational Health and Safety Conference recently strongly supported and signed a petition calling for the introduction of "Jimmy's Law" into the provincial legislature, says Larry Hubich, president of the SFL. The proposed law is named after Jimmy Wiebe, who was murdered at a gas station convenience store on June 20 in Yorkton. (WCxKit)
 
 
It would require employers to schedule two employees to work together between the hours of 10 or 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. or provide protective barriers between lone workers and the public.
 
 
The incident that prompted the petition occurred in the early morning hours. Members of the Yorkton RCMP received a report of a man who had been found deceased in the Shell Canada convenience store by a customer, says Corporal Rob King, a spokesman for the Saskatchewan RCMP division. Four days after, King says, the Yorkton RCMP detachment charged Kyle Furness, 20, with first-degree murder in connection with the homicide of the 50-year-old worker, an employee of the store for more than 10 years.
 
 
Jimmy's Law is modeled after similar working alone regulations in British Columbia which were introduced in 2008, but have not yet come into effect because of the complexity of the issue, according to Megan Johnston, a spokeswoman for WorkSafeBC. That year, however, BC introduced a separate pay-then-pump requirement following the death of a young gas station attendant.
 
 
"Grant's Law" – named after Grant De Patie, who was dragged to his death while trying to prevent the theft of gas from a station in Maple Ridge, BC – requires mandatory pre-payment of fuel at all gas stations in BC, Johnston says.

 

Wayne Hoskins, president of the Western Convenience Stores Association (WCSA) in Surrey, BC, says it's important to note the distinction between mandatory pre-payment of gas and the requirement for multiple workers or barriers. "While Grant's Law was well-intended, it refers to outside, or ex-store, and not in-store coverage," Hoskins explains.
 
 
In British Columbia, the working alone regulations – known as the Late Night Retail Safety Procedures and Requirements – consist of an engineering control (barrier) or administrative control (extra staff), Johnston says. Hoskins says that a third option has also been proposed: additional training, testing and certification. This option, a combination of both engineering and administrative controls, will be presented to WorkSafeBC's board of directors in October. (WCxKit)
 
 
Ontario is another jurisdiction considering a mandatory pre-paid policy for gas stations following a recent gas-and-dash incident. A  gas attendant Hashem Rad, 62, was struck by a vehicle that took off with unpaid gas at a Petro-Canada station in Mississauga, Ontario. Rad was taken to hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries the following day.
 
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
 

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

British Columbia Reaches Out to Employers and Others Regarding Safety

Supervisors, workers, and employers in any industry in British Columbia may benefit from a new WorkSafeBC online safety training course that can be accessed any time, free of charge. The Supervising for Safety course provides information and resources on supervision and the key role it plays in providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace, according to a report from WorkSafeBC.
 
 
It’s all about getting occupational health and safety resources to the customer in ways that meet their needs,” says Gordon Thorne, WorkSafeBC manager of Safety Videos & Publications, who helped build the course. “Making the course available on its own Web site and on Facebook increases access by bringing the classroom experience to the participant.” (WCxKit)
 
 
The program originated with an industry group of labour, business, and WorkSafeBC officers concerned with injury and disease prevention. Supervisors in industry may lack a full understanding of their role and responsibilities relating to the safety of their workers, including the requirement to provide information, instruction, training, supervision, verification of knowledge, and correction of workplace hazards.
 
 
We built the program because there wasn’t much out there for supervisors,” says Mike Tasker, a WorkSafeBC occupational safety officer based in Prince George, and one of the program’s originators. “So we put together the course based on our experience as supervisors, and best practices for what works in safety management.”
 
 
Organized into nine modules, the course can take seven to eight hours to complete and also allows you to select the topics you want to explore and proceed at your own pace. It contains over 60 video clips and templates of forms, checklists, and other WorkSafeBC safety resources to download.
 
 
A large percentage of injuries within certain sectors of the tourism industry, such as hotels and ski hills, are musculoskeletal injuries,” says Trina Wright, Program Manager, Industry Health and Safety for go2, the B.C. tourism industry’s HR organization and COR certifying partner. “The course content regarding these injuries can help supervisors identify the causes of injury and show them how to implement programs to decrease the likelihood of MSI injury.” (WCxKit)
 
 
The course can be accessed at SupervisingforSafety.com or on Facebook by searching for “Supervising for Safety”. 
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

MANAGE WORK COMP NOW!   www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact

WorkSafeBC Reports Flat Average Rate for 2012

WorkSafeBC recently announced that the average base premium rate for registered employers in British Columbia remains unchanged from 2011.
 
 
According to a report from the WBC, the 2012 average published base rate will be $1.54 per $100 of employers assessable payroll. WorkSafeBCs average published base rate for 2008 through 2010 was $1.56. The rates continue to be among the lowest in Canada and the lowest rates in B.C. for the last 30 years. (WCxKit)
 
 
The average published base rate is a composite of rates in 67 individual rate groups, or insurance pools, which are compilations of various classification units. Insurance premium rates for B.C.’s 206,000 employers are based on the claims cost (or safety) history of their industry and of similar employers, and are further adjusted based on individual performance.
 
 
For 2012, 53 percent of employers will experience a base rate decrease and eight percent of employers will have their base rate remain unchanged, while 39 percent of employers will experience a base rate increase.
 
 
WorkSafeBC projects a deficit at the end of 2011 and modest increases to the average base rate starting in 2013.
 
 
Premium rates charged to employers must be sufficient to cover the current and future needs of B.C.’s injured workers, some of whom will require financial and medical aid for the rest of their lives. To support financial requirements and maintain low and stable rates, WorkSafeBC invests a portion of the funds collected from employers.
 
 
Rate decreases are projected for the following industries: municipalities, public schools, fishing, ranching, log hauling, real estate, steep- and low-slope roofing, retail art galleries, movie theatres, bingo halls, telephone and cable services, ferry services, heavy equipment manufacturing, general retail, private schools, greenhouses, wineries, couriers, auto servicing, dentists, optometrists, most health care services, orchards and berry farming, coffee shops, wood mills, libraries, garbage removal services, recycling depots, public art galleries, and construction management consulting.
 
 
Most accommodation services, finishing carpentry, supermarkets, butcher shops, colleges, law and notary public offices, travel agencies, insurance, accounting, business and computer consulting services, restaurants, taxis, and general trucking will see their rates remain virtually unchanged or will incur modest rate changes. (WCxKit)
 
 
Industries whose rates are projected to increase include: movie and television production and post-production; television or radio broadcasting; ski hills; retail bakeries; animal boarding; airports; flooring stores; farm labour supply services; dump truck operations; campgrounds; liquor stores; residential framing; most waterfront operations; sawmills; construction labour supply; log-home construction; helicopter services; log towing; house construction; unions; residential tree services; casinos; manual tree falling; and grain, hay, white-mushroom, and vegetable farming.
  
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact

Distracted Driving a Significant Risk for British Columbia Workers

WorkSafeBC is working with The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) to reduce the risks of distracted driving in British Columbia, according to a report from ICBC.
 
 
The province, police, ICBC and WorkSafeBC are reminding drivers of the dangers of distracted driving, focusing on raising awareness among employers and their staff, as part of September’s distracted driving campaign. (WCxKit)
 
 
In B.C., crashes are the number one cause of traumatic work-related deaths, according to WorkSafeBC statistics. On average, approximately 30 workers in B.C. are killed each year while driving and distracted driving, such as cell phone use, is a key factor in these crashes.
 
 
As government, we have established aggressive legislation and police have done a good job of enforcement but really this is about your friends, family and colleagues, so set an example,” said Shirley Bond, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General. “We know these deaths and injuries are preventable. Let voicemail do its job or pull over. Safe driving requires your full attention.”
 
 
A recent Ipsos Reid survey conducted on behalf of ICBC revealed that only 9 per cent of drivers think that commercial drivers are better than the general public at following B.C.’s new restrictions on the use of hand-held electronic devices while driving.
 
 
Workers and employers in B.C. need to take steps to eliminate any risks or distractions and consider that when you’re behind the wheel, driving is your only job,” said Diana Miles, senior vice-president of Worker and Employer Services at WorkSafeBC.
 
 
To help workers and employers, new materials are now available to download on WorkSafeBC.com, including a sample safe-driving policy; tip sheets for employers, supervisors and workers; as well as a new video to help drive home the message even further.
 
 
We need to shift our attitudes toward distracted driving – we can all do our part to help create a culture where friends, families and colleagues don’t expect you to answer the phone while driving,” said Fiona Temple, director of road safety, ICBC. (WCxKit)
 
 
A distracted driver is not only committing a traffic offence, they are being selfish and stupid,” added Chief Jamie Graham, Traffic Committee Chair of the British Columbia Association of Chiefs of Police. “That’s why police have been blanketing the province targeting and charging the people who just don't get it. You have to be responsible for your actions, pay attention and focus on driving – you will help prevent a tragedy.”
  
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Roadside Workers Are In the Cone Zone

In the “cone zone” there is not much to protect a worker at the side of the road from being seriously injured or killed by a passing vehicle.


As WorkSafeBC points out in a recent release, there are thousands of workers in British Columbia that work in the cone zone and have had to dodge drivers that do not slow down sufficiently and pay attention when traveling through their work zone.(WCxKit)
 

In the last 10 years, WorkSafeBC reports that 386 workers — typically working in cone zones — were struck by motor vehicles. Of that number, 46 percent were classified as serious injuries and 12 resulted in the death of the worker.
 

“Roadside workers are extremely vulnerable. That is why it’s so important that you take extra care in construction zones,” said Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Blair Lekstrom. “Whenever you approach someone working on or near our roads and highways, please slow down. We want all our workers to stay safe, so they can go home to their families at the end of the day.”
 
 
A large segment of drivers say they adjust driving behavior when traveling through or past a cone zone, yet there have already been several incidents this season where traffic control workers have been seriously injured.
 
 
But it is not just traffic control workers or road construction crews that are at risk. Other workers, including municipal workers, landscapers, tow-truck drivers, road-maintenance workers, telecommunications and utility workers, and emergency and enforcement personnel, work in potentially high-risk environments in close proximity to traffic.
 
 
To make drivers more aware of the dangers, the Work Zone Safety Alliance recently launched the “Cone Zone” campaign, a road safety initiative that encourages drivers to slow down, pay attention and be respectful when driving near roadside workers.
 
 
The campaign objective is to reduce the number of deaths and injuries of workers at the side of the road by increasing awareness of their vulnerability in the cone zone.(WCxKit)

 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Professional Development Resource

Learn How to Reduce Workers Comp Costs 20% to 50%"Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%"
Lower your workers compensation expense by using the
guidebook from Advisen and the Workers Comp Resource Center.
Perfect for promotional distribution by brokers and agents!
Learn More

Please don't print this Website

Unnecessary printing not only means unnecessary cost of paper and inks, but also avoidable environmental impact on producing and shipping these supplies. Reducing printing can make a small but a significant impact.

Instead use the PDF download option, provided on the page you tried to print.

Powered by "Unprintable Blog" for Wordpress - www.greencp.de