6 Filipino Workers Crushed to Death During On The Job Accident

Five workers were immediately crushed to death and seven more injured when a 42-ton elevated ramp fell on workers at Keppel Subic Shipyard earlier this month. Later the same day one of the seven injured workers died in hospital in Olongapo, according to a report from the Metal Workers Alliance of the Philippines (MWAP).
 
 
The MWAP conducted a fact-finding mission at the site, and found irregularities in Keppel’s health and safety practices which caused the tragic incident. They were presented at a press conference in Quezon City. (WCxKit)
 
 
The steel tower ramp that fell on the workers was reportedly shaky, and lacked the usual 10-ton support. There was only one boom when the incident happened – a deviation from the common practice of using four booms when a ramp is repaired.
 
 
We hold the management of the Keppel Shipyard responsible for non-implementation of mechanisms ensuring workers safety and lives. We call on the government to conduct a thorough investigation and help shed light on the real reasons and lessons of the incident,” said Reden Alcantara, MWAP secretary-general.
 
 
Accidents are common in the shipbuilding and shipyard industry. At the nearby Hanjin shipyard in Subic, more than 40 workers have died in industrial accidents. “The industry requires the highest standards of occupational health and safety due to the dangers inherent in it,” Alcantara said.
 
 
The workers alliance likewise called on the government to review the Philippine Economic Zone Authority’s jurisdiction over the country’s special economic zones to make the PEZA at least conform to existing labor laws.
 
 
We are alarmed by the fact that investigators and even Subic Mayor Jay Khonghun were initially denied entry to the company premises because it is under the jurisdiction of PEZA. Is Keppel so powerful as to have its own laws and regulations that are contrary to Philippine laws?” Alcantara asked. (WCxKit)
 
 
The fact-finding mission’s initial findings will be presented to the Congressional Oversight Committee on Labor and Employment to urge the body to conduct an investigation into the incident in aid of legislation.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
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Asian Workplace Deaths Up Slightly and Noise Induced Deafness Has Increased Reporting

Workplace fatalities increased slightly over the first half of the year as compared to the same period last year, according to the latest Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Report released by the Singapore-based WSH Council.
 
 
From 25 during the first half of 2010, 30 fatalities were recorded from January to June 2011. Fall from height remained the leading type of incident since 2006, which resulted in 13 fatalities, followed by being struck by moving objects, which killed five. Three fatalities were attributed to being struck by a falling object caused by a collapse or failure of structure and equipment. (WCxKit)
 
 
Other causes of death are being caught in/between objects, fires and explosions, crane-related accidents, electrocution, and oxygen deficiency in a confined space.
 
 
Seventy-seven percent of fatalities came from the three traditional sectors – Marine, Construction and Manufacturing. These sectors also accounted for about 78 per cent of permanent disablements and occupational diseases. However, in terms of less serious injuries or temporary disablements (TD), they account for about 41 percent of 4,697 cases.
 
 
Meanwhile, the overall number of workplace injuries fell by 8 percent and permanent disablements fell by 37 percent. Some 43 percent of temporary disablements, which decreased slightly, include incidents like employees tripping in cluttered work areas and sustaining injuries or being struck by heavy objects while retrieving them from shelves.
 
 
Chairman of the WSH Council, Lee Tzu Yang, noted "Although the number of workplace injuries has been declining by 5 percent to 8 percent over the last two years, we can see that we cannot afford to relax. … The Council is committed to getting everyone on board, and we can only succeed if employers want to ensure their employees' safety and take concrete measures to improve.
 
 
"Employees in turn need to follow the safety rules, learn to be aware of risks and look out for each other. Everyone must put safety first, and I include offices, wholesale and retail companies, which form part of the new sectors that account for 40 percent of workplace incidents."
 
 
The number of occupational diseases went up from 124 in 2010 to 361 in 2011, primarily due to the increased reporting of Noise-Induced Deafness (NID) related cases. More NID cases were reported following an island-wide audit exercise by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM).
 
 
Of the 315 NID cases reported, only one was in the advanced stage. The other 314 cases are in their early stages. Excluding NID cases, the number of occupational diseases in the first half of 2011 was 46 compared to 37 over the same period last year. (WCxKit)
 
 
In response to this, the WSH Council has developed materials to assist employers of workers who may be exposed to noisy work environments.

 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
 

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Distracted Driving a Significant Risk for British Columbia Workers

WorkSafeBC is working with The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) to reduce the risks of distracted driving in British Columbia, according to a report from ICBC.
 
 
The province, police, ICBC and WorkSafeBC are reminding drivers of the dangers of distracted driving, focusing on raising awareness among employers and their staff, as part of September’s distracted driving campaign. (WCxKit)
 
 
In B.C., crashes are the number one cause of traumatic work-related deaths, according to WorkSafeBC statistics. On average, approximately 30 workers in B.C. are killed each year while driving and distracted driving, such as cell phone use, is a key factor in these crashes.
 
 
As government, we have established aggressive legislation and police have done a good job of enforcement but really this is about your friends, family and colleagues, so set an example,” said Shirley Bond, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General. “We know these deaths and injuries are preventable. Let voicemail do its job or pull over. Safe driving requires your full attention.”
 
 
A recent Ipsos Reid survey conducted on behalf of ICBC revealed that only 9 per cent of drivers think that commercial drivers are better than the general public at following B.C.’s new restrictions on the use of hand-held electronic devices while driving.
 
 
Workers and employers in B.C. need to take steps to eliminate any risks or distractions and consider that when you’re behind the wheel, driving is your only job,” said Diana Miles, senior vice-president of Worker and Employer Services at WorkSafeBC.
 
 
To help workers and employers, new materials are now available to download on WorkSafeBC.com, including a sample safe-driving policy; tip sheets for employers, supervisors and workers; as well as a new video to help drive home the message even further.
 
 
We need to shift our attitudes toward distracted driving – we can all do our part to help create a culture where friends, families and colleagues don’t expect you to answer the phone while driving,” said Fiona Temple, director of road safety, ICBC. (WCxKit)
 
 
A distracted driver is not only committing a traffic offence, they are being selfish and stupid,” added Chief Jamie Graham, Traffic Committee Chair of the British Columbia Association of Chiefs of Police. “That’s why police have been blanketing the province targeting and charging the people who just don't get it. You have to be responsible for your actions, pay attention and focus on driving – you will help prevent a tragedy.”
  
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

OSHA Fines New Hampshire Gun Powder Manufacturer 1.2 million

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued 54 workplace safety and health citations with penalties totaling $1.2 million to gun powder substitute manufacturer Black Mag, LLC, following an investigation into the causes of a deadly explosion in May at the company's worksite in Colebrook, N.H., according to information from OSHA. The explosion took the lives of two workers who had been on the job for only a month.
 
 
May 14, two workers and a plant supervisor were manufacturing a gun powder substitute known as Black Mag powder when the explosion occurred. The workers had been required to hand feed powder into operating equipment due to the employer's failure to implement essential protective controls. The employer also chose not to implement remote starting procedures, isolate operating stations, establish safe distancing and erect barriers or shielding – all of which are necessary for the safe manufacture of explosive powder.
 
 
"The fines levied here pale in comparison to the value of the two lives lost," said Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. "Nonetheless, this was a tragedy that easily could have been prevented had the employer valued the health and safety of its employees. Employers should not sacrifice their workers' lives for a profit, and no one should be injured or killed for a paycheck."(WCxKit)
 
 
Additionally, the employer chose not to provide the personal protective equipment and other safety measures its employees needed to work safely with such hazardous material. OSHA cited the company with four egregious willful, 12 willful, 36 serious and two other-than-serious violations with total penalties of $1,232,500.
 
 
"Even after a prior incident in which a worker was seriously injured, and multiple warnings from its business partners and a former employee, this employer still decided against implementing safety measures," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels. "Unfortunately, we see this kind of disregard time and time again across industries. All employers must find and fix workplace hazards so these types of avoidable tragedies do not happen, and workers can return home safely at the end of the day."
 
 
The four egregious willful citations were issued for failure to train each of the four workers involved in the manufacture of the gun powder substitute. In addition to the two workers killed and their supervisor, there was an additional employee who left the job nine days before the explosion. Willful citations are considered egregious when more than one worker is exposed to a single hazard. The citation issued for that hazard is then multiplied by the number of workers exposed.
 
 
Other willful citations were issued for failure to locate operators at safe locations while equipment was operating; separate workstations by distance or barriers and ensure that each worker was properly trained; provide adequate personal protective equipment, such as fire resistant clothing, face shields and gloves; to safely store gun powder; and identify explosion hazards in the company's operating procedures. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.
 
 
Some of the 36 serious citations were issued for failure to separate small arms ammunition from flammable liquids, solids, and oxidizing materials by a fire-resistive wall or by a distance of 25 feet; establish and implement an emergency action plan and provide written procedures to manage changes; provide personal protective equipment including clothing, respiratory devices, protective shields and barriers for workers exposed to lead; train workers on appropriate protective equipment; train workers in electrical safety-related work; address hazards associated with exit routes; and address hazards associated with handling, storing and transporting explosives.(WCxKit)
 
 
The two other-than-serious violations are for a failure to perform respirator fit tests and to ensure that facial hair does not interfere with a respirator seal. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing.  Go to: www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


OUR WORKERS COMP MANUAL:
www.WCManual.com
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Irish Recycler Fined $65K Plus after Worker Dies

A fine of $65,496 was handed down recently by Judge Moran in the Limerick Circuit Criminal Court to "Mr. Binman," a waste collection and recycling company, providing services to both household and commercial customers in Ireland since 1994.
 
 
According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the fines were imposed for breaches of health and safety legislation on March 21, 2008 at Luddenmore, Grange Kilmallock, Co. Limerick. The case arose as a result of the death of John Wright, an employee of Mr. Binman. (WCxKit)
 
 
Wright was involved in an accident at the waste management facility where he was struck with a loading shovel machine. Wright, a bin truck driver, was walking from his truck to the offices/canteen area when the incident occurred.
 
 
Wright was removed from the scene to the Limerick Regional Hospital where he later died from his injuries. He had worked for Mr. Binman for approximately 14 years and was 64 years old.
 
 
Speaking after the judgment, Martin O’Halloran, chief executive of the Health and Safety Authority, said, “This accident was foreseeable and preventable. It is clear in this case that "Mr. Binman" failed in its duties to ensure that mobile machinery and pedestrians could move about the workplace in a safe manner.”
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


Our WORKERS COMP BOOK: 
www.WCManual.com

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Union Fires 5 Complaints at Fire Brigade Bosses

The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) recently called on London Fire Brigade bosses to give greater commitment to the safety of its firefighters after a damning report by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) identified several failings.
 
 
The report by the HSE was a follow-up exercise focusing specifically on areas of concern which arose following the deaths of two London firefighters – Bill Faust and Adam Meere – at a fire in Bethnal Green in 2004. While improvements had been identified in some areas, in others the lessons have not been learned. (WCxKit)
 
 
The report, made public by the Fire Brigades Union, highlights thirteen areas for improvement, including the need for better training in the use of breathing apparatus. The HSE has told London Fire Brigade to come up with an action plan to address the shortcomings.
 
 
Key points from the report include:
 

1.      A widespread view by firefighters that training in core firefighting skills had taken a back seat to “community work;”

 

2.      Concerns over the quality and frequency of training in the “risk critical” area of use of breathing apparatus while tackling fires;

 

3.      Demands by firefighters for better training often going unheeded by bosses;

 

4.      Officers expected to deliver training often complain that they have received insufficient training themselves;

 

5.      A lack of facilities for “real fire training,” which would simulate real-life firefighting scenarios.

 
 
The FBU’s regional health and safety co-coordinator Gordon Fielden said, “This very disturbing report puts the London Fire Brigade on notice that it must do much more to protect its firefighters from danger while they are at work.
 
 
We are especially alarmed over the many concerns raised by the HSE over the inadequacy of breathing apparatus training. This is the most critical part of a firefighter’s job and one that can make the difference between lives being lost or saved. The London Fire Brigade expects its firefighters to put their lives on the line to rescue others. The very least it can do is to make sure it gives them the very best training to do their jobs. But it is failing and the result of that failure could well be lives lost.
 
 
We have been arguing for a long time that training in core firefighting skills is being sacrificed to allow for more extensive work in the community. Community work has its place, but is wrong and dangerous for the brigade not to make basic training the priority.
 
 
Previously the brigade has audited itself in some of these areas, and not surprisingly those audits produced glowing conclusions and an outpouring of self-congratulation. But it has taken an independent body to show that those audits were a charade. (WCxKit)
 
 
Now the brigade has been handed an action plan for its failings. The chairman of the fire authority, Councilor Brian Coleman, has been very quick in the past to bathe in the glow of perceived success. Now he needs to take responsibility for these serious failings,” Fielden added.
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


Our WORK COMP BOOK:  
www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

On Duty Firefighter Deaths Lowest in 34 Years

The number of on-duty firefighter deaths is the lowest since 1977, according to the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) annual Firefighter Fatality Report, showing a total of 72 on-duty firefighters died in the United States in 2010.
 
 
Officials reported this is a sharp drop from the 105 on-duty deaths in 2008 and 82 in 2009 and it is the lowest annual total since the NFPA began conducting this annual study in 1977. (WCxKit)
 
 
This is the fifth time in the last decade the total number of deaths was below 100. While the number of total deaths dropped sharply, the number of cardiac-related deaths did not. Heart attack deaths were remarkably stable over the past six years.
 
 
According to the report, the areas in which the deaths fell is diverse. The year 2010 saw the lowest number of fire ground deaths ever (21) and deaths while responding to or returning from alarms (18), the second lowest death number. Deaths related to training activities (11) and while engaged in other non-emergency duties (18) about matched the average numbers from the previous 10 years.
 
 
Other key numbers in the report included: Nine deaths in crashes of road vehicles in 2010 and 2009, the lowest since 1983. There were 44 volunteer firefighter deaths in 2010, continuing a downward trend. The ages of all U.S. firefighters who died ranged from 20 to 86 with a median age of 52.5 years.
 
 
Each year, the NFPA gathers information on all firefighter fatalities in the U.S. resulting from injuries or illnesses occurring while the firefighters were on-duty. The term “on-duty” means being at the scene of an alarm, whether a fire or non-fire incident; responding to or coming back from an alarm; or participating in other fire department duties.
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Our Workers Compensation Book: www.WCManual.com
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Garment Workers Sandblasting Jeans Dieing From Silicosis says Change.org

Most of us know what sand-blasted jeans look like – a distressed look in all the right places – and one that has increased in popularity as the technology behind the technique has made for more variety and precision in the style.
 
 
In fact, you may even own a pair of sand-blasted jeans. There they are, hanging in your closet.
 
 
But, did you know they could have caused someone’s death? That’s right, your jeans could be killing someone.
 
 
Change.org is charging Dolce & Gabbana (D&G) for using this process because it propels the dangerous dust into the environment when workers fire sand under high pressure at clothing. Once in the air, the dust finds its way into workers’ lungs and many develop incurable lung conditions and die.
 
 
Change.org states companies such as Versace, Gucci, H&M, and Levi’s have stopped using sandblasting for these reasons. “But D&G is still holding on — with disastrous consequences,” says a recent Change.org release.
 
 
Change.org is an online activism platform that allows participants to start grass roots campaigns or petitions from its site. The organization says it works with more than 1,000 of the world’s largest organizations and uses a team of hundreds of journalists and organizers around the planet.
 
If you are interested in signing the anti-sand-blasting petition, you may do so here. In reads, in part, “Silicosis has long been associated with workers in the mining industry and it is only recently that this illness has been documented among garment workers. However, from the current evidence, it is clear that this is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Unlike the chronic form common to miners, which can take 20 years to develop, the acute silicosis experienced by jeans sandblasters develops within six months to two years of exposure. Therefore, workers are at risk of developing the disease after a relatively short period of exposure. Sandblasting operators are falling gravely ill unexpectedly and suddenly.”
 
The petition, run by the Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC), says garment-producing countries such as Turkey and Bangladesh still sand-blast manually, exposing workers to silica, which causes silicosis in the lungs. “Eventually, workers die because they cannot breathe properly anymore. There is no known cure,” it says.
 
 
The CCC claims more than 1,300 people have signed the first Change.org petition – prompting Versace to announce it will no longer work with any supplier using sandblasting. According to the site, Versace advisor Tomaso Galli said, "Versace has specifically asked every supplier and will ask any new supplier as a condition to work with Versace to certify that they are not using sandblasting." If any supplier violates Versace’s policy, "they will be considered in breach of contract and dismissed accordingly." (WCxKit)
 
Currently there are nearly 26,000 signatures asking D&G to stop the practice.
 

Author Rebecca Shafer
, JD, President of Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing, publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Cambodian Officials in Malaysia Investigate Worker Death

 
Cambodian embassy officials in Malaysia are investigating the death of a Cambodian domestic worker earlier in July and plan to interview neighbors of her former employer, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs reported.
 
 
Koy Kuong, spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, reported that embassy officials had been dispatched to Penang province to investigate the cause of woman’s death, following allegations made recently that she was abused.(WCxKit)
 
The deceased woman’s aunt, Sorn Chanthy, 38, from Phnom Penh’s Dangkor district, commented she did not believe her 19-year-old niece, Choy Pich, died from pneumonia July 17 as reported by labor recruitment firm AP TSE & C Cambodia Resource Co., Ltd. A medical check conducted prior to her niece leaving for Malaysia in September last year, she remarked, gave her a clean bill of health and the young woman had never previously suffered from any diseases.
 
 
Concerns were raised about the maid’s death after an email was sent to news aggregation site Khmerization by a person familiar with the situation.
 
 
The email alleging abuse noted the date of death, TSE and the area of Malaysia in which Choy Pich died but incorrectly identified the victim’s name and age. Nevertheless, it sparked rights groups and politicians to seek an investigation into the worker’s death. It also fuelled Sorn Chanthy’s suspicions that abuse, not disease, was the cause of her niece’s demise.(WCxKit)
 
 
Seng Sithichey, president of AP TSE & C, reiterated his belief that a medical certificate from Malaysia showed Choy Pich had died from pneumonia and said he was unsure what to do with her body, which would be costly to repatriate.

 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Canada Considers Switching to Prepaid Policy Following Death of Gas Station Employee

In an effort to increase safety for attendants at gas stations, the Ministry of Labor (MoL) in Ontario is considering imposing a prepaid policy following an attendant’s death in a “gas and dash” incident.
 
 
According to the Canadian OH&S News, gas attendant Hashem Atifeh Rad, was hit by a vehicle leaving the station without paying for the gas. The attendant was found on the roadway with severe injuries and died in hospital the next day according to a Peel Regional Police statement, which also revealed the driver reportedly was seen covering up his license plates prior to leaving the scene. (WCxKit)
 
 
In an effort to increase the pressure, the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) in Toronto is slated to vote on a resolution requesting the province to legislate mandatory prepaid services at gas stations. The resolution, provided by the Hamilton Police Service, was voted on at the annual general meeting in Huntsville, Ontario June 29.
 
 
Ontario is not the first province to consider prepaid systems. British Columbia put in place a pay-then-pump system in 2008 after the death of a young gas attendant. Grant's Law, named after Grant DePatie who died in a gas theft incident in March of 2005, requires mandatory prepayment for gasoline, and safe work practices and protection for gas station workers.
 
 
According to a Ministry of Labor representative, "Employers are required to assess risks and to have measures and procedures in place to control those risks. For gas stations, one of those risks needing to be addressed is gas-and-dash."
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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