OSHA Proposed Penalties of $949,000 for Texas Employers for Unguarded Machinery Fall Hazards and More

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited PJ Trailers Manufacturing Co. Inc. and Delco Trailers Co. Inc., a similar company owned by PJ Trailers, for seven willful, 26 serious, nine repeat and four other-than-serious violations.
 
 
According to an agency report, OSHA inspectors found workers exposed to unguarded machinery, fall hazards and accumulations of potentially hazardous dust, among other violations. Proposed penalties total $949,800. (WCxKit)
 
 
"Employers have a responsibility to keep their workers safe and healthy. Willful and repeat citations, as well as significant penalties, reflect the fact that management knew workers were exposed to dangerous conditions yet failed to provide them with basic safety protections. That choice is unacceptable and needlessly placed these workers' health and safety at risk," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels.
 
 
PJ Trailers Manufacturing and Delco Trailers are commonly owned, with the same president and management. They share a work site, a human resources division and a safety and health manager, and they have interrelated and integrated operations. PJ Trailers and Delco Trailers previously had been cited by OSHA for many of the same hazards that the agency found during its most recent inspection. Although the company had certified abatement of the prior hazardous conditions, many of the fixes were later abandoned to accommodate production. Since 2008, at least 15 workers have suffered eye injuries requiring medical treatment and or days away from work.
 
 
OSHA's Dallas Area Office initiated a safety and health inspection at the company's facility at 1807 Farm to Market 2352 in Sumner following receipt of a complaint that employees were not adequately protected from being injured by rotating machinery parts, and employees were exposed to toxic welding fumes while fabricating trailers and noise levels above approved health standards.
 
 
The willful violations involve failing to provide fall protection for employees working on stacked trailers, provide adequate machine guarding to prevent "caught-in" or "caught-between injuries," provide employees with proper eye protection during cutting and welding operations, and establish and maintain an audiometric testing program. Audiometric testing is required when employees are exposed to high noise levels to determine if their hearing is being adversely affected. A willful violation is one committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to employee safety and health.
 
 
Repeat violations include failing to ensure that all spray booth areas were kept free from accumulated powder coating, guard several pieces of hazardous machinery, have all necessary lockout/tagout procedures, provide training on existing lockout/tagout procedures to protect employees from hazardous machinery starting up unexpectedly and ensure that medical evaluations were completed to determine employees' ability to use respirators. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. OSHA cited the company in September and October of 2006 and March 2010 for similar violations.
 
 
Serious violations include failing to provide required fall protection, provide training on electrical hazards and prevent exposure to welding fumes in excess of the average allowed during an 8-hour shift. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.
 
 
Other-than-serious violations include failing to enter recordable injuries and illnesses on the OSHA 300 log within seven calendar days and properly certify the OSHA 300A form or its equivalent. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm. (WCxKit)
 
 
The workers compensation carrier insuring PJ Trailers and Delco Trailers is Farmington Casualty Co.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Occupational Low Back Pain Causes, Workplace Solutions and Treatment Options

Authors: Brian Anderson DC, CCN, MPH and David C. Radford, DC, MSc

 

 

Employers are unlikely to find another issue that leads to more absenteeism and detracts from productivity in the workplace more than occupational low back pain (LBP). This, the first in a series of articles, introduces the ubiquity of this problem in the workplace, what solutions are effective in addressing it, and what treatment options can be most successfully employed when workers do injure their low backs.

 

 

In order to understand the scope of this problem, it is worthwhile to discuss some statistics related to occupational LBP.

 

  • Occupational LBP is the largest single health problem related to work absenteeism, and the  most common cause of incapacity among workers younger than forty-five years old.
  • Worldwide, 37% of LBP was attributed to occupation.
  • 1% of the US population is permanently disabled from this problem.
  • Occupational LBP accounts for 68% of sick days and 76% of sick leave payment costs in some industries.

 

As is obvious from the above statistics, LBP consistently creates huge expenditures and time loss from work. Employees whose job involves lifting, bending, twisting or repetitive spinal movements are most at risk for these injuries. This type of LBP is classified as kinetic or dynamic overload injury. Due to the nature of LBP, these workers are also more likely to need extended time off work when suffering a low back injury. Transitionally, they may also need modified duty for a period of time on their return to work.

 


Ergonomic interventions
, which will be addressed in part two of this series, are crucial for the prevention of occupational LBP. Acute LBP is almost never related to one specific event, but rather is the culmination of a long history of improper mechanics and micro-trauma to the spine. As apposed to kinetic injury, static or postural LBP is also a huge problem for “desk jockeys,” or those who sit for prolonged periods of time. Lack of movement can sometimes be as detrimental as too much movement.

 

To summarize, the risk factors for occupational LBP are:

 

  • cumulative traumas;
  • dynamic activity-trunk flexion and rotation, heavy physical work, bending or squatting, lifting or carrying loads;
  • long work shifts without pauses;
  • static and inadequate postures.

 

 

Workers suffering low back injuries can be divided into three groups: work being the primary cause of LBP; work being one of many contributing factors related to LBP; and those with a preexisting back injury which may be aggravated by work. Those workers who fall into the latter category should be very carefully monitored. There will always be cases of occupational LBP that cannot be predicted or even prevented, but a worker with a previous history of LBP does not fall into this category. Matching the worker to the job is a crucial prevention strategy, which will be discussed in part two of this series.

 

 

What should be most concerning to employers, and is likely the most important reason for intervention, is preventing acute low back pain from becoming a chronic problem. There is plenty of data to suggest that most acute low back pain is self-limiting. With or without treatment, many cases of acute low back pain resolve in a few weeks. There are, however, two issues that should be of concern regarding occupational LBP; recurrence and chronicity. The recurrence rate of low back pain is 30-60% within 1-2 years.

 

 

There are also some documented risk factors for developing chronic LBP after an acute injury which employers and health care providers should be aware of. These are:

 

  • dissatisfaction with work
  • physical inactivity/obesity
  • low vitamin D levels
  • smoking
  • performing heavy lifting
  • depression
  • being involved in litigation
  • educational level

 

 

In part three of this series, we will discuss treatment options designed to prevent chronic low back pain.

 

 

If employers are not actively working with their company nurses and doctors developing strategies and programs to address and prevent occupational LBP, hopefully they will after reading this series of articles. Next time we will address programs and interventions targeting primary and secondary prevention of occupational LBP. Stay tuned!

 

 

Resources:

 

  1. Estimating the global burden of low back pain attributable to combined occupational exposures – http://www.who.int/quantifying_ehimpacts/global/5lowbackpain.pdf
  2. Occupational low back pain: Rev Assoc Med Bras 2010; 56(5): 583-9
  3. Preventing Occupational Low-Back Pain. West J Med 1988 Feb; 148:235
  4. Can We Identify People at Risk of Non-recovery after Acute Occupational Low Back Pain? Results of a Review and Higher-Order Analysis. Physiother Can. 2010;62:9 –16
  5. Designing a workplace return to work program for occupational low back pain: an intervention mapping approach. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2009 10:65
  6. Liebenson, C. Rehabilitation of the Spine- A Practitioners manual, 2ndedition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

 

 

Dr. Anderson works as a supervising clinician and instructor at National University of Health Sciences in Lombard IL. He has been in private practice, as well as part of a team in a University based Integrative Medicine setting. In addition, Dr. Anderson has experience in the medico-legal field, serving as an expert for various insurance companies and legal firms. He earned a Masters Degree in Public Health, as well as a Certified Clinical Nutritionist designation. He is currently working toward a specialty diplomate in Functional Rehabilitation. Contact Dr. Anderson for more information at banderson@nuhs.edu

 

 

Dr. Radford is in private practice. He is a third generation Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine. He earned a Master’s Degree in Advanced Clinical Practice and he provides conservative primary care. He has treated work related injuries for more than 30 years. Dr. Radford has found that treating the co-morbidities that often accompany injured workers like obesity, medication overuse, and addiction lead to a more complete recovery. He was a founding member of the Cleveland Orthopaedic and Spine Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio. Contact for more information at DCR8888@aol.com or (440)-248-8888.

 

 

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OSHA Fines New Hampshire Gun Powder Manufacturer 1.2 million

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued 54 workplace safety and health citations with penalties totaling $1.2 million to gun powder substitute manufacturer Black Mag, LLC, following an investigation into the causes of a deadly explosion in May at the company's worksite in Colebrook, N.H., according to information from OSHA. The explosion took the lives of two workers who had been on the job for only a month.
 
 
May 14, two workers and a plant supervisor were manufacturing a gun powder substitute known as Black Mag powder when the explosion occurred. The workers had been required to hand feed powder into operating equipment due to the employer's failure to implement essential protective controls. The employer also chose not to implement remote starting procedures, isolate operating stations, establish safe distancing and erect barriers or shielding – all of which are necessary for the safe manufacture of explosive powder.
 
 
"The fines levied here pale in comparison to the value of the two lives lost," said Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. "Nonetheless, this was a tragedy that easily could have been prevented had the employer valued the health and safety of its employees. Employers should not sacrifice their workers' lives for a profit, and no one should be injured or killed for a paycheck."(WCxKit)
 
 
Additionally, the employer chose not to provide the personal protective equipment and other safety measures its employees needed to work safely with such hazardous material. OSHA cited the company with four egregious willful, 12 willful, 36 serious and two other-than-serious violations with total penalties of $1,232,500.
 
 
"Even after a prior incident in which a worker was seriously injured, and multiple warnings from its business partners and a former employee, this employer still decided against implementing safety measures," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels. "Unfortunately, we see this kind of disregard time and time again across industries. All employers must find and fix workplace hazards so these types of avoidable tragedies do not happen, and workers can return home safely at the end of the day."
 
 
The four egregious willful citations were issued for failure to train each of the four workers involved in the manufacture of the gun powder substitute. In addition to the two workers killed and their supervisor, there was an additional employee who left the job nine days before the explosion. Willful citations are considered egregious when more than one worker is exposed to a single hazard. The citation issued for that hazard is then multiplied by the number of workers exposed.
 
 
Other willful citations were issued for failure to locate operators at safe locations while equipment was operating; separate workstations by distance or barriers and ensure that each worker was properly trained; provide adequate personal protective equipment, such as fire resistant clothing, face shields and gloves; to safely store gun powder; and identify explosion hazards in the company's operating procedures. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.
 
 
Some of the 36 serious citations were issued for failure to separate small arms ammunition from flammable liquids, solids, and oxidizing materials by a fire-resistive wall or by a distance of 25 feet; establish and implement an emergency action plan and provide written procedures to manage changes; provide personal protective equipment including clothing, respiratory devices, protective shields and barriers for workers exposed to lead; train workers on appropriate protective equipment; train workers in electrical safety-related work; address hazards associated with exit routes; and address hazards associated with handling, storing and transporting explosives.(WCxKit)
 
 
The two other-than-serious violations are for a failure to perform respirator fit tests and to ensure that facial hair does not interfere with a respirator seal. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing.  Go to: www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


OUR WORKERS COMP MANUAL:
www.WCManual.com
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Welding Accident Injures Womans Finger British Employer Prosecuted

A global car components manufacturer has been fined after a Staffordshire, Great Britain, woman fractured and burned her left middle finger while operating a welding machine.
 
 
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) reported that it prosecuted ThyssenKrupp Tallent, Ltd., following the incident at the company's factory at Quadrant Point, Cannock, in August of 2010.(WCxKit)
 
 
The 43-year-old agency worker from Burntwood, who did not want to be named, was using the machine to weld nuts onto car parts when her left hand middle finger became trapped between the electrode and another part of the machine.
 
 
South Walls Magistrates' Court heard the woman fractured her finger and suffered a severe electrical burn, which has left her with continuing numbness. She was unable to return to work for four months and was in a great deal of pain during her recovery, needing help with day-to-day tasks including washing, dressing, and preparing food.
 
 
An HSE investigation found the machine had no jig fitted to hold the work piece in place and was set to single-hand operation control. Workers had to hold the work piece in place with their left hand, while using their right hand to press the control button to operate the machine. This meant the left hand was very close to the unguarded moving parts and could become caught.
 
 
ThyssenKrupp Tallent, Ltd, of Aycliffe Trading Estate, Darlington, pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 11(1) (a) of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 and Regulation 3(1) of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. The company was fined £16,000 ($25,500) and ordered to pay £5972 ($9500) in costs.(WCxKit)
 
 
The court also heard the company had been fined as a result of a prosecution by HSE in 2009, following a previous incident relating to machinery guarding at the Cannock site.

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


Workers Compensation Book: www.WCManual.com  
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Healthy Workforce Key to Sustainable Recovery Says Europe OSHA

The European workforce's well-being is key to a sustainable economic recovery, according to the head of the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA).
 
 
Introducing his last annual report as agency director, Dr. Jukka Takala emphasized the danger that the economic crisis might push people out of employment permanently, and huge numbers may find themselves excluded from the job market because of long-term ill health. “For the whole of the E.U., we can estimate the production loss from people being excluded from work on health and disability grounds at Є30,000 billion – every year. For comparison, the emergency measures that were introduced to stabilize the Greek economy cost in the range of Є110 billion, and those for Ireland, Є85 billion, just as a one-off.” (WCxKit)
 
 
According to Dr. Takala, it is important that future economic growth should be inclusive, creating conditions that enable people to continue at work, safely and healthily. “We need to ensure not just that current jobs are safe, healthy, and productive; we should strive towards a safe, healthy, productive, sustainable, satisfying, and motivating working life,” he said.
 
 
The 2010 annual report emphasizes the ways in which the agency has continued to work to protect the safety and health of European workers, in spite of these difficult economic conditions. One highlight has been the opening of the Healthy Workplaces Campaign on Safe Maintenance – the agency’s two-year health and safety campaigns are now the largest of their kind in the world. The Safe Maintenance Campaign has seen record numbers of partner organizations involved.
 
 
The agency also published results of the European Survey of Enterprises on New and Emerging Risks (ESENER), which, for the first time, provide real-time data from enterprises across Europe on what they are doing to tackle occupational risks (specifically psychosocial risks).
 
 
Another highlight of 2010 was the agency piloting the Online interactive Risk Assessment tool (OiRA), the legacy of the Healthy Workplaces Campaign on Risk Assessment 2008-09. The OiRA tool, which the agency is making available for free, will help many thousands of small companies across the E.U. carry out risk assessments in a simple and cost-effective way.
 
 
Looking ahead, 2011 will be the second year of the Safe Maintenance Campaign, including the closing event in November.(WCxKit)
 
 
The agency continues with the detailed study of the results of the ESENER survey, and planning is has begun for the 2012-13 Healthy Workplaces Campaign on the subject of working together for risk prevention.

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

OUR WORKERS COMP BOOK: www.WCManual.com
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Shocking Safety Violations Endanger Electrical Workers

For failing to provide a safe work environment for workers installing an electrical grid upgrade both The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. and Grubb & Ellis Management Services Inc. were cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) for serious violations of workplace safety standards for exposing workers to electrical hazards at The Hartford’s corporate headquarters and data center in Hartford, CT.

 

 

Employers are charged by OSHA with the responsibility of providing safe and healthful workplaces for employees and OSHA sets and enforces these standards by providing training, education, and assistance.

 

 

The Hartford was issued one serious citation and may be fined as much as $7,000. Grubb & Ellis was issued six serious citations with $34,000 in proposed fines. OSHA issues a serious citation when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

 

 

OSHA found The Hartford’s data center policy required electricians employed by its maintenance contractor, Grubb & Ellis, to perform work in live electrical panels for computer equipment without first de-energizing (shutting off) the panels. Grubb & Ellis failed to de-energize the electrical panels before having its employees perform installation work and grid upgrades.

 

In addition, Grubb & Ellis was cited for:

 

  1. Assigning employees to work on live parts and circuits on the electrical systems;

 

  1. Failing to train workers on electrical safe work practices and use of protective equipment needed to guard against electrical hazards;

 

  1. Failing to have in place a specific hazardous energy control procedures to prevent the activation or the release of hazardous energy from equipment during maintenance and repair work;

 

  1. Failing to develop and adequately train all authorized employees on hazardous energy control and procedures for safely applying, using, and removing energy control devices.

 

“Employers must understand they or their contractors must first de-energize electrical equipment and circuits before employees work on them,” said Paul Mangiafico, OSHA’s area director in Hartford. “Working on live electrical equipment needlessly exposes workers to potential death or disabling injury from arc flash, arc blast, or electric shock. Proper and effective safeguards must be in place and in use at all times.”

 

 

Each employer has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, meet with OSHA’s area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

 

 

Detailed information on electrical hazards and safeguards at: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/electrical/index.html

 

Information on hazardous energy control is at: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/controlhazardousenergy/index.html

 


Author Rebecca Shafer
, JD, President of Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

Our WC Manual: www.WCManual.com

WORK COMP CALCULATOR: http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  http://www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

WC GROUP: http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/

SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Questionable Safety for Guatemalan and Nicaraguan Migrant Workers

Declarations making it easier to protect the rights of Guatemalan and Nicaraguan citizens who work in the United States were recently signed by Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis, Guatemalan Ambassador Francisco Villagrán De Léon, and Nicaraguan Ambassador Francisco Campbell.
 
 
"Individuals from Guatemala and Nicaragua make important contributions to the U.S. economy, and their workplace rights should be protected," Solis said. "I am pleased that the U.S., Guatemalan, and Nicaraguan governments are working together to help make that happen." (WCxKit)
 
 
According to a report from OSHA, the declarations enable the regional enforcement offices of the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Wage and Hour Division to cooperate with local Guatemalan and Nicaraguan embassies and consulates to distribute information to migrant workers about U.S. health, safety, and wage laws. Training will also be provided to migrant workers and their employers.
 
 
In conjunction with the declarations, letters of agreement were signed by the two agencies. The Wage and Hour Division is now able to protect migrant workers in low-wage industries such as hospitality and agriculture. OSHA continues efforts to improve workplace safety and health conditions while simultaneously providing outreach and assistance to Spanish-speaking workers and employers. (WCxKit)
 
 
Additionally, through these agencies, the Labor Department is better able to identify problems experienced by migrant workers and to target labor law enforcement efforts. OSHA, for example, plans to provide a toll-free telephone number staffed by multilingual operators who are ready, day and night, to receive calls from migrant workers about safety and health issues.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Contractor Fined and Qualified for OSHA Severe Violators Enforcement Program

A roofing contractor with a long history of violating workplace safety standards faces nearly $244,000 in proposed fines from the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) following a December 2010 inspection resulting in citations for alleged egregious, willful, serious, and repeat violations for failing to provide fall protection and having other workplace hazards.
 
 
OSHA previously cited Lessard Brothers Construction Inc. and its predecessor, Lessard Roofing & Siding Inc., 10 times for fall protection violations at various Maine work sites. OSHA inspectors found four Lessard employees exposed to potentially life-threatening falls of 23 feet while working on a steep-pitched roof at a work site. Due to management's knowledge of the hazard and the required safeguards, along with the company's extensive history of violations, Lessard was cited for four egregious, willful violations with $224,000 in proposed fines. (WCxKit)
 
 
Since October 28, 2010, according to Maine's workers compensation insurance verification system, Lessard Brothers Construction has been without workers compensation insurance coverage.
 
 
This employer ignored the law and put workers’ lives at risk,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels. “OSHA's commonsense regulations save lives. Employers who ignore these regulations and endanger employees must face the consequences.”
 
 
In addition, Lessard was cited for two serious violations with $10,560 in proposed fines for an electrical hazard and for failing to train workers on electrical hazards and fall protection. The company also was cited for one repeat violation with a proposed fine of $8,800 for a lack of hardhat protection. The repeat citation stems from OSHA citing the company in January 2010 for a similar hazard.
 
 
Falls are the number one killer in construction work,” said Marthe Kent, OSHA's New England regional administrator. “Employees in situations such as this are just one slip, trip or misstep away from a fatal or disabling fall. Responsible employers must ensure that effective fall protection measures are in place and in use every day on every job site.” (WCxKit)
 
 
This significant enforcement action qualifies Lessard Brothers Construction for OSHA's Severe Violators Enforcement Program (SVEP), mandating targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law. Initiated in 2010, SVEP focuses on recalcitrant employers who endanger workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations.
 
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com .

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Contractor Cited by OSHA When Chemical Tank Explosion Kills Worker

Federal safety officials have cited science-based products company DuPont and a New York contractor for 17 safety violations after the explosion of a 10,000-gallon chemical tank that left one worker dead and injured another.
 
 
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommended $61,500 in fines for DuPont and $55,440 in fines for contractor Mollenberg-Betz Inc. (WCxKit)
 
 
A Mollenberg-Betz welder died last November while attaching a bracket to the storage tank at DuPont's plant in Tonawanda, close to Buffalo.
 
 
OSHA cited both companies for not taking steps to prevent welding in an explosive environment.
 

According to a DuPont spokesman, the Wilmington, Del.-based company is reviewing the findings and will meet with OSHA in the next few days.

 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

Report on Fatal British Workplace Injuries

 
June 28 marked the publication by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) of the 201011 workplace fatal injury statistics for Great Britain.
 
 
HSE notes the underlying five-year trend for workplace fatalities continues downward. The number of such deaths in 2010-11 were 171 workers killed, lower than the five-year average. Despite the downward trend there are a number of aspects that give serious cause for concern.(WCxKit)
 
 
The number of workplace fatalities rose from 147 in 200910 to 171 in 201011.There was a significant increase in the rate of fatal injury per 100,000 workers – up from 0.5 in 200910 to 0.6 in 201011. While the number of workplace deaths in the agriculture sector fell from 38 to 35 there were an increased number of deaths in the construction, manufacturing, and service sectors.
 
 
Construction sector deaths rose from 41 to 50, manufacturing sector deaths rose from to 24 to 27 and service sector deaths rose from 42 to 47.In terms of the rate of fatal injury, the agriculture and waste recycling sectors stand out as having the highest fatal injury incidence rates.
 
 
Julie Nerney, chief executive of the British Safety Council, expressed concern, noting, “The grim reality underlying today’s news is that 171 workers were killed in workplaces across Great Britain in 201011. We pride ourselves on the strength of our health and safety regulatory framework, our competence, and our commitment to keeping our workers healthy and safe and, yet, avoidable deaths are still occurring.
 
 
Tragically, today’s announcement brings home in graphic terms the consequence of not effectively managing workplace hazards. Had that commonsense and logical course of action been taken in managing workplace hazards it is quite possible that those 171 workers would still be alive and going home to their families at the end of the working day.(WCxKit)
 
 
The British Safety Council has corporate members across many sectors. We have a significantly large number of members in construction and manufacturing. We will be re-doubling efforts to work with them to build competence and spread good practice to those organizations in those sectors struggling to be compliant. We owe that much to the families of those who died in needless workplace accidents.”

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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