Fall and Fine Could Have Been Prevented With Proper Safety Plan

 

Fell 10 Feet From Roof
 
New Zealand building company Keith Hay Homes Ltd. has been fined $22,100 after the employee of a contractor was seriously injured after falling almost 10 feet from a roof, according to the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment.
 
The Auckland District Court heard that on June 9, 2011 three employees of Metind Limited were working on a single storey Keith Hay residential home in Glen Innes, Auckland.
 
“While reaching down to secure a safe hold on the ridge of the damp roof, one of the employees slipped and fell approximately 10 feet to the ground, fracturing his lower back, several ribs and damaging shoulder tendons and ligaments,” said MBIE Labour, Northern General Manager John Howard.
 
 
Fall Could Have Been Prevented
 
The MBIE Labor investigation into the incident found that it could have been prevented if the defendant had liaised with its contractor to plan a safe approach to working at height at the Glen Innes site and put in place appropriate roof edge protection so that no employee of a contractor was harmed while doing any work the contractor was engaged to do.
 
“Preventing falls from height is a priority for MBIE and we expect everyone with staff or contractors working at height to actively manage this significant hazard,” Howard added.
 
 
Best Practices for Working at Height
 
The Best Practice Guidelines for Working at Height in New Zealand provide practical guidance about how prevent harm.
 
To complement the guidelines a series of six fact sheets have also been produced. These focus on:
 
     how to plan a safe approach to working at height
     how to select the right equipment for the job
     short duration work at height
     edge protection
     temporary work platforms
     total restraint system.
 
“All employers, contractors and employees who are required to work at height should read the guidelines and fact sheets so they take appropriate precautions to ensure the safety of those working at height. Doing nothing is not an option,” Howard concluded.
 
 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Too Many Roofers are Falling – New Guidelines Set for Safety

 

New Guidelines to Prevent Falls
 
New guidelines to help prevent workers falling from roofs have been launched in the New Zealand roofing industry.
 
The Best Practice Guidelines for Working on Roofs were prepared by the Department of Labour in association with the Roofing Association of New Zealand to provide practical guidance to employers, contractors, employees, designers, principals and persons who control a place of work and architects who are involved in work associated with roofing.  [Wcx]
 
 
Preventing Falls from Height Project
 
Construction is one of five sectors where specific action plans have been developed to reduce the death and injury toll.  The roofing guidelines have been launched as part of the ‘Preventing Falls from Height’ project which aims to raise awareness about working safely at height and reducing the human and financial toll caused by falls from height,” according to Department of Labour Program Manager Francois Barton.
 
More than half the falls from height reported to the Department are happening from under three meters – and most of these falls are from roofs and ladders. Too many roofers are falling,” Barton continued. “These guidelines are a practical way of helping roofers and others in the construction sector understand what safe working practice at height looks like. Preventing falls while working at height is a top priority for the Department.”
 
 
Targeting 25% Reduction in Serious Injuries & Deaths
 
The Department of Labour has recently set a target of a 25 percent reduction in serious injuries and deaths by 2020 and these guidelines will help regulators, employers, employees and industry associations contribute to meeting that target.
 
Starting in July, the Department of Labour will be commencing targeted enforcement in the construction sector, particularly focusing on residential building sites, to prevent falls from height. [Wcx]
 
The Department is increasing the visibility and intensity of workplace visits in the construction sector and turning up the heat around poor practice. If we see nothing is being done to prevent falls from height in the workplace, we’ll take appropriate enforcement steps. Doing nothing is not an option,” Barton added.

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

 

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Common Mistakes that Cause Falls on Construction Sites

 

Per the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) there were 774 deaths among construction workers on the job in 2010. Falls accounted for 264 fatalities and were the leading cause of death for construction workers. The sad part is most of the fatalities could have been prevented with proper construction site safety. Falls also cause numerous non-fatal injuries. With proper fall prevention incorporated into the safety program, a significant portion of the non-fatal accidents on constructions sites could be avoided as well.

 

 

There is risk of a fall is whenever employees are on an elevated surface – ladders, scaffolds, bridges or roofs.. Employers need to recognize the potential dangers involved and plan the work in a way that will allow its completion while reducing the risk of injury as much possible. This includes determining what safety equipment and safety gear is needed, and how it will be used to prevent the possibility of a fall.[WCx]

 

 

OSHA regulations require any worker six feet or higher above the lower level to have “personal fall arrest systems”. In non-government speak, a safety harness or a system of railings around the edges of the work surface to keep the employee protected from the edge and a fall.

 

 

In planning the work, the employer should be conscientious to provide the right equipment. Ladders that are too short, scaffolding that has seen better days or worn out safety gear is an invitation to a workers compensation claim. The equipment and gear provided to the employees should be appropriate for the job.

 

 

Planning the work with safety in mind and providing the safety equipment and safety gear will not prevent injuries if the employees do not know how to use the equipment and gear correctly.Employers often take it for granted that employees know how to use ladders or scaffolding, but improper use of equipment is the most common reason for accidents. For example: Ladders are  frequently used in a dangerous fashion.

 

Common ladder mistakes include:

 

Going up or down the ladder facing away from the ladder

Over reaching away from the ladder

“Walking the ladder” (moving the ladder sideways by bouncing up down while on the ladder)

Failure to maintain three point contact (two feet and one hand or two hands and one foot while ascending/descending the ladder)

Not placing the ladder on a level surface

Not securing the ladder (tying it off or bracing so that it cannot move)

Setting a ladder up on scaffolding, or worse, a ladder on a ladder!

 

 

Common mistakes with scaffolding include:

 

Partially planking the scaffolding, instead of fully planked

Not installing the guardrails

Not verify the scaffolding is plumb and level before using it

Not checking the assembly to be sure all proper connections have been made

Climbing over the cross braces

Standing on the guardrails

Reaching outside of the scaffolds

 

 

When working at heights of six foot or higher, the most effective “personal fall arrest systems” is a full body harness, a rope-grab lifeline, and connectors. The full body harness uses D-rings to connect the body harness to the rope-grab lifeline. The rope-grab lifeline is securely attached to the roof, scaffolding or other surface that is structurally strong enough to support the employee’s full weight in the event of a fall.[WCx]

 

 

Fall prevention on construction sites will save the employer significantly on the cost of workers compensation insurance, as fall prevention will lower both the frequency of accidents and the severity of the accidents that do happen. By planning the job,providing the right equipment and training the employees on the proper use of it, employers can eliminate most falls, save lives and reduce the number of injuries.

 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com.  Contact:  mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com
MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Make Your Workers Comp Costs Fall to Their Death Instead of Your Employees

 

Per the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) there were 774 deaths among construction workers on the job in 2011. Falls accounted for 264 fatalities and were the leading cause of death for construction workers. The sad part is most of the fatalities could have been prevented with proper construction site safety. Falls also cause numerous non-fatal injuries. With proper fall prevention incorporated into the safety program, a significant portion of the non-fatal accidents on constructions sites could be avoided as well.
 
 
The risk of a fall is presented whenever employees are on an elevated surface – ladders, scaffolds, bridges or roofs.  Employers need to recognize the potential dangers involved and plan the work in a way that will allow its completion while reducing the risk of injury. This includes determining what safety equipment is needed and how it will be used to prevent the possibility of a fall.[WCx]
 
 
OSHA regulations require any worker six feet or higher above the lower level to have “personal fall arrest systems”.  These could include a safety harness or a system of railings around the edges of the work surface to keep the employee protected from the edge and a fall.
 
 
The employer needs to be conscientious to provide the right equipment for the job. Ladders that are too short, scaffolding that has seen better days, or worn out safety gear is an invitation to a workers compensation claim. The equipment and gear provided to the employees should be appropriate for the job.
 
 
Planning the work with safety in mind and providing the proper safety equipment will not prevent injuries if the employees do not know how to use it correctly.Employers often take it for granted that employees know how to use ladders or scaffolding, but improper use of equipment is the most common reason for accidents. 
 
Common ladder mistakes 

  • Going up or down the ladder facing away from the ladder
  • Over reaching away from the ladder
  • “Walking the ladder” (moving the ladder sideways by bouncing up down while on the ladder)
  • Failure to maintain three point contact (two feet and one hand or two hands and one foot while ascending/descending the ladder)
  • Not placing the ladder on a level surface
  • Not securing the ladder (tying it off or bracing so that it cannot move)
  • Setting a ladder up on scaffolding, or worse, a ladder on a ladder!
 
 
Common Scaffolding Mistakes

  • Partially planking the scaffolding, instead of fully planked
  • Not installing the guardrails
  • Not verify the scaffolding is plumb and level before using it
  • Not checking the assembly to be sure all proper connections have been made
  • Climbing over the cross braces
  • Standing on the guardrails
  • Reaching outside of the scaffolds
 
 
When working at heights of six foot or higher, the most effective “personal fall arrest systems” is a full body harness, a rope-grab lifeline, and connectors. The full body harness uses D-rings to connect the body harness to the rope-grab lifeline. The rope-grab lifeline is securely attached to the roof, scaffolding or other surface that is structurally strong enough to support the employee’s full weight in the event of a fall.[WCx]
 
 
Fall prevention on construction sites will save the employer significantly on the cost of workers compensation insurance, as fall prevention will lower both the frequency and severity of the accidents that do happen. By planning the job, providing the right equipment, and training the employees on the its proper use, employers can eliminate most falls, save lives and reduce the number of injuries. 
 


 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com
MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

New Hampshire Employer Cited for Endangering Workers

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports it recently cited Monster Contracting LLC for alleged willful and serious violations of safety standards at a residential construction site located at 100 Bradley St. in Manchester, New Hampshire. The Candia-based framing contractor faces a total of $59,200 in proposed fines following an inspection by OSHA's Concord Area Office.

 
 
 
"Employees at this job site faced the risk of disabling or deadly injuries from falls, crushing injuries, or being struck by flying debris or objects while operating nail guns and other tools," said Rosemarie Ohar, OSHA's area director for New Hampshire. "Compounding the situation was the fact that these employees lacked training that would have taught them how to recognize and avoid such hazards." [WCx]
 
 

OSHA found employees exposed to falls from heights of 6 to 20 feet while performing exterior and interior framing work without fall protection or near an unguarded window, floor and stairwell openings, which resulted in a citation for one willful violation with a $28,000 fine. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.

 
 

Nine serious violations with $31,200 in fines include a lack of eye protection for employees working with nail guns, power tools and staplers; damaged and misused ladders; a damaged sling used to lift walls; the employer's failure to certify that powered industrial truck operators had been trained; unsafe access to elevated areas of the building; lumber with protruding nails in a work area; not training employees to recognize fall, material handling, electrical and flying object hazards; and not training employees in the safe operation of power tools and the proper use of ladders.

 
 
 
A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known. [WCx]
 
 

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, meet with OSHA's area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. 

 

 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

 


WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT MANUAL:  www.WCManual.com

VIEW SAMPLES PAGES

MODIFIED DUTY CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

 

©2012 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Construction Director Prosecuted after Worker Injuries

A Pembroke Dock, Wales construction company and its director have been prosecuted after a labourer suffered serious injuries on a construction site, according to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).
 
 
Karl Kraus, 31, from Pembroke Dock was employed by Preseli Construction & Maintenance Ltd, and was working on the build of a large domestic property at Incline Way, Saundersfoot. (WCxKit)
 
 
Haverfordwest Magistrates Court heard that on March 25, 2010, Kraus was instructed to remove a concrete block that had been placed across a doorway. As he proceeded to throw the block, he fell backwards on to the balcony and then seven metres to the ground below.
 
 
An HSE investigation found that the three-story house was being built without scaffold or any form of fall prevention.
 
 
Preseli Construction & Maintenance Ltd. and its director, Christopher Newell, had failed to ensure that work at height was properly planned and supervised. They also failed to ensure that it was carried out in a safe manner.
 
 
Kraus spent six days in Morriston Hospital in Swansea where he underwent surgery to pin the bone in his left heel and was in a plaster cast for approximately ten months.  Still in constant pain and unable to walk on uneven ground without risking a fall, he is due to undergo further surgery to prevent any further damage to his foot, but his career in the construction industry is over.
 
 
Preseli Construction & Maintenance Ltd. of Waterloo Industrial Estate, Eastern Avenue, Pembroke Dock pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 4(1) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. It was fined $7,671.6 and ordered to pay costs of $1,519.37. (WCxKit)
 
 
Newell of The Glebe, Narberth Road, Tenby also pleaded guilty to breaching Section 37(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. He was fined $ 2,557, with costs of $1,519.37. Newell is also disqualified from acting as a company director, managing or in any way controlling a company for at least two years.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is a contributing author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Manage Your Workers Compensation: Reduce Costs 20-50% www.WCManual.com. Visit at: www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 
Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

British Firm Contractor Fined For Worker Fall

A building firm and a contractor in North Yorkshire, Great Britain were recently fined after a worker was injured following a fall while working on the construction of a new farm building, according to a report from The Health and Safety Executive (HSE).
 
 
The 36-year-old worker, who asked not to be named, was employed by Stephen Ramsey, trading as Up & Cover, who had been subcontracted by Waddington Buildings Limited to carry out steel erection work and cladding on the building at Brierton North Farm, Billingham. Both Ramsey andWaddington Buildings Limited were prosecuted by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). (WCxKit)
 
 
Teesside Magistrates’ Court was told the worker was standing on a pallet fitted to a fork attachment of a tractor, which was lifted to heights of around four and a half meters to allow the worker to measure and fit guttering to the building. The court heard the tractor was being operated by Stephen Ramsey when it unexpectedly moved with the pallet in a raised position causing the worker to lose his balance and fall to the ground.
 
 
He spent 15 days in a hospital after his left heel was smashed and his right ankle was fractured and treatment is still ongoing.
 
 
HSE’s investigation revealed Ramsey failed to carry out the work safely and Waddington Buildings Limited had failed to establish whether work carried out on their behalf would be done safely and whether Stephen Ramsey was competent to do the work.
 
 
Stephen Ramsey, pleaded guilty to breaching the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and was fined £1,000 ($1,567) and ordered to pay £250 ($3920) costs. (WCxKit)
 
 
Waddington Buildings Limited, of Station Road, Brompton on Swale, pleaded guilty to one breach of Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and was fined £3,500 ($5,484) and ordered to pay costs of £900 ($1,410).

 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 

NEW 2012 WORKERS COMP BOOK:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

Pair of Australian Employers Fined after Man Suffers Permanent Fall Injuries

Two Australian companies and two of their directors have been fined a total of $512,500 and ordered to pay WorkCover New South Wales’ legal costs after a man fell from the roof of a large shopping center redevelopment in Merrylands, sustaining severe and permanent injuries.
 
 
H Hassarati and Co Pty Ltd (Hassarati) was a demolition and excavation company and BU Hazardous Material and Demolition Pty Ltd (BU Hazardous) was an asbestos and general demolition company, both based in Sydney. The companies were part of the major redevelopment of the Stockland Shopping Centre in Merrylands. (WCxKit)
 
 
The construction company engaged for the redevelopment subcontracted the demolition works to Hassarati, who then subcontracted BU Hazardous to help it with some of the work, including the removal of roof sheeting and insulation.
 
 
The accident occurred when a 56-year-old worker was manually removing roof sheeting and insulation from a building without a harness when he slipped and fell almost eight meters, hitting an air-conditioning duct before landing on the concrete floor below. The man sustained serious and permanent injuries.
 
The investigation found:
 
1.     The defendant did not have enough safety harnesses and inertia reels harnesses for all of the employees required to work on the roof. As a result BU Hazardous did not provide the injured person or other employees working on the inner section of the roof with harnesses.
2.     There were no adequate safety instructions or training provided for working from heights to employees.
3.     There was no system in place to make sure all workers were provided with a harness at all times while on the roof.
4.     Both companies had failed to properly supervise and instruct their staff. (WCxKit)
 
Both companies were charged with breaches to the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000.
 
BU Hazardous was convicted and fined $300,000 and its director Bo Ung was convicted and fined $30,000. Hassarati was convicted and fined $175,000 and its director Paul John Hassarati was convicted and fined $7,500.

 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is an editor and contributor to Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 
 
 
2012 WORKERS COMP MANAGEMENT GUIDEBOOK is here:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

British Satellite Firm Prosecuted after Fatal Employee Injury

 
British satellite TV installation firm Foxtel, Ltd, has been prosecuted following the death of a worker who fell while carrying out work on a roof, according to a report from Health and Safety Executive (HSE).
 
 
Engineer Noel Corbin, 29, from New Addington, Croydon, suffered fatal head injuries after falling 13.5 meters (44.3 ft.) from a four-story house onto a side patio in Belsize Park, London Feb. 3, 2008. (WCxKit)
 
 
The Old Bailey heard safety equipment found in Corbin's van was unsuitable for the type of work he was undertaking.
 
 
An HSE investigation after the incident exposed a number of failings at Foxtel, Ltd., including failure to ensure work at height was properly planned, organized, and monitored.
 
 
The Old Bailey heard Corbin was working on a satellite TV dish on the property's roof apex and had accessed the roof via a dormer window. Before his fall he was also seen working on another satellite dish located on a flat roof. Evidence suggests Corbin fell from the flat roof itself or while walking across the sloping roof.
 
 
The court was told when Corbin was first employed by Foxtel, Ltd., references were not sourced from his previous employer, nor were any training certificates provided. Corbin was also not accompanied on any initial visits so therefore no assessment could be made of his competence.
 
 
As a result, the HSE investigation concluded as soon as Corbin stepped onto the roof, he was at high risk of slipping, tripping or falling. Most of the work on satellite dishes Corbin undertook involved work at height on large properties with more than two stories.
 
 
Foxtel, Ltd., based in Wates Way, Brentwood, Essex, pleaded guilty to breaching section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. Today, the firm is no longer trading and was shown to have no assets. The court fined the company £1 ($1.65).(WCxKit)
 
 
Falls from height remain the most common cause of workplace fatality. In 2008/09 there were 35 fatalities, 4,654 major injuries and a further 7,065 injuries that caused the injured person to be off work for three or more days .

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


Our Workers Compensation Book:  www.wcmanual.com
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Fall Protection Goes into Effect in Canada

Following nearly seven years of research, analysis, consultation and evaluation, amendments to fall protection legislation in New Brunswick (Canada) came into effect in the New Year.
 
 
According to Canadian OH&S News,the changes, in effect as of Jan. 1, impact the General Regulation (91-191) of the provincial Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA). (WCxKit)
 
 
The amendments include: preference to systems that do not allow a worker to fall, such as guardrails and travel restraints; increased instruction and training requirements; new provisions for roofing and weatherproofing sectors; reference to new and updated Canadian Standards Association guidelines; and, additional responsibilities for building owners to ensure anyone conducting work on their behalf complies with the legislation.
 
 
"In the area of fall protection, we felt we werent keeping up with current standards," said Richard Blais, director of the chief compliance office at WorkSafeNB. "We felt there was not enough substance in our current legislation and we needed to enhance that."
 
 
One of the major themes WorkSafeNB wanted to address was implementation of a 'hierarchy of intervention, Blais noted. "Preventing people from falling would be one of the principles that we would embed in our new amendments versus allowing people to fall and then having to rescue them. Quite frankly, once you set yourself up, I think people work a lot faster and certainly theyre a lot safer when you have guardrails than when you have fall arrest or safety monitors.”
 
 
Blais also noted that the provision for a control zone safety monitor, who helps ensure workers dont fall, had existed before the amendments, "but it was lacking in specificity in terms of what employers should do." Calling a control zone "a wobbly line," Blais notes the amendments now require a fall protection code of practice for those working from a height of 7.5 meters or more and when working within a control zone with a safety monitor.
 
 
"Keep in mind that's not really… fall protection," he argued. "You're not going there to catch people before they fall you're just trying to warn them before."
 
 
Another key amendment is the clarification of responsibilities for building owners to ensure that anyone conducting work on their behalf complies with the legislation.
 
 
Even though the OHSA addresses the general duty provisions of owners with respect to health and safety, WorkSafeNB believes there was not "enough teeth" in the act. "We put in a lot of emphasis on responsibilities of building owners to ensure the legislation itself was being followed by the contractors that they hire," Blais stated.
 
 
Roy Silliker, general manager of the New Brunswick Construction Safety Association in Miramichi, stated that the amendments are "nothing new" for the construction industry. "The industry has been using the standards [that are] in the new regulation for quite some time now," he says. (WCxKit)
 
 
Silliker also notes that WorkSafeNB will be conducting information sessions across the province in February. He adds that the association was in the process of reviewing its fall protection awareness course, but has decided to hold off on putting out the course until the consultations are complete.
 


Author Robert Elliott
, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information.  Contact:  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
WC GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/
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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact
Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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