Alberta Government Thinks Not Reporting Fatalities Will Make Them Go Away

 

Alberta Provincial Government No Longer Reporting Farm Fatalities
 
The Alberta Federation of Labour (Canada) is criticizing the provincial government for no longer reporting farm fatalities, according to a report from the Canadian Press.
 
The federation claims the move is an example of how ''agricultural workers are being erased in Alberta.''
 
 
Criticism That Lack of Reporting Hides Problem
 
''This decision to stop reporting the number and nature of farm deaths helps to hide the real problem _ Alberta's deplorable lack of workplace protection for farms workers in the province,'' spokeswoman Nancy Furlong said recently.
 
''It's particularly insulting to the families of those killed on the job to have to call on the government to continue to simply report these incidents.''
 
 
Only Province in Canada Farm Workers Not Covered by Health & Safety Laws
 
The federation says the province is the only one in Canada where farm workers aren't covered by occupational health and safety laws. It says they are also excluded from legislation on hours of work and overtime, statutory holidays and vacation pay.
 
A judicial inquiry in 2008 into the death of worker Kevin Chandler in a farm accident near High River, Alta., recommended the inclusion of farm labourers in laws ensuring workplace protections.
 
''It is the government's duty to protect workers, but also to report their deaths and injuries. Death and injury prevention requires knowledge of the frequency and nature of the incidents,'' said Furlong.
 
 
Province Announced Plans on Website
 
The federation says the province announced its plans on a government website and offered no meaningful explanation for the change.
 
Alberta Agriculture said recently it is reviewing how it publishes information about farm worker deaths and injuries with an eye to protecting the privacy of victims and their families.
 
Stuart Elson, a ministry spokesman, said at least two ministries are studying the issue. ''Education and awareness are best suited to the practical realities of farming,'' Elson said. ''We are continuing to work with the Ministry of Human Services to improve farm safety. That is all I can really say at this point.''
 
 
More Criticism of Policy
 
The NDP's agriculture critic used a stop in Lethbridge, Alta., to blast the government for what he called inaction on workplace safety for farm workers.
 
David Eggen said it's disturbing that the lives of Alberta labourers on the land appear to mean so little to the government.
 
''It's very dangerous work and farm workers are not being protected with the basic rights that other workers have here in Alberta,'' Eggen said.
 
''They're far behind the rest of Canadian farm workers and now suddenly (Premier Alison) Redford makes the page go dark on the statistics that we can use to track farm workers here in the province,” he added.
 
 
 

Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher.  www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com Contact mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com

 

 


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CANADA Alberta Labor Groups Seek More Workplace Protections

Alberta labour groups are calling on the province to do more to prevent a growing number of workplace fatalities, according to a report from The Canadian Press.
 
 
The call for action comes shortly after an Edmonton worker was killed by a steel beam that collapsed at an Edmonton jobsite. (WCxKit)
 
 
The employee's death marks Alberta's 14th workplace fatality this year, which is four more than in all of 2010.
 
 
Construction worker Ali Fattah says nobody seems to be taking the situation seriously so it is becoming more dangerous.
 
 
He says a lot of the accidents are preventable.
 
 
Barrie Harrison, with the Occupational Health and Safety board, is among those at the provincial level working to prevent what he admits are too many injuries and fatalities in an inherently dangerous construction sector.
 
 
Harrison cites worker and employer safety education as a crucial part of the provincial safety strategy. He also points to the hiring of new OHS inspectors and targeted job site inspections that are intended to make jobsites safer.
 
 
While the Alberta Federation of Labour agrees education is part of the solution, it feels what the province is doing isn't enough.
 
 
The labour group's Gil McGowan says in Alberta the new inspectors only replace the inspectors who were laid-off during the Klein years, and employers receive advanced warnings about the targeted inspections, which defeats their purpose.
 
 
He believes those factors contribute to the province lagging behind all others when it comes to safety.
 
 
McGowan also blames the high workplace fatality numbers on the province ignoring warnings, and not taking advantage of a lull in development to adequately prepare for safety issues related to our province's returning growth. (WCxKit)
 
 
McGowan noted further tragedies could be averted if the government puts what he believes is just talk into action  specifically more unannounced inspections, and a more aggressive approach to prosecuting employers who put their workers at risk.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. He is co-author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Manage Your Workers Compensation: Reduce Costs 20-50% www.WCManual.com. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 
 
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Alberta Hockey Rink Dedicated to Fallen Worker

An Alberta community has dedicated their rebuilt hockey rink to a young worker who was killed on the job, according to a report from the Canadian OH&S News.
 
 
The Josh Malysh Rink of Dreams, just outside Devon, Alberta, about 40 kilometers southwest of Edmonton, was officially opened last month. Josh's father, Charles Malysh, said about 500 people came out for the opening. (WCxKit)
 
 
"The old one was falling apart. My son had spent a lot of time there playing shinny with his friends, and when we approached the idea to do a park or something as a memorial, [his friends and family] wanted to do something where Josh spent a lot of time, which was at that rink," said Malysh.
 
 
The new rink was built by a crew of mostly friends and family using donated materials, according to Malysh, after the old outdoor rink was demolished about a month ago.
 
 
Josh Malysh's friends filled the concrete pad that the ice will sit on with mementos of his life. His goalie sticks were buried in the concrete under the nets, his old jersey under centre ice and his trophies were placed in a container and buried as well.
 
 
Josh Malysh was working with Sureway Construction in southwest Edmonton, installing water and sewer lines in a new subdivision. As the crew was lowering a concrete sewer pipe into the trench he was working in, it swung around unexpectedly, pinning the 21-year-old worker against the wall of the trench and fatally crushing him, said Barrie Harrison, a spokesman for Alberta Employment and Immigration.
 
 
A stop work order was issued after the incident, but OH&S charges have not been laid, Harrison said.
 
 
Charles Malysh also works for Sureway, as a project manager. He wasn't on site at the time of the accident, but says he was there when his son was pulled out of the trench. (WCxKit)
 
 
"What they think is you are safe at home, you're safe at work, the place where an accident is going to happen is going to and from. In this case it was an accident at work and I'm trying to show them accidents happen all over the place," said Malysh. "You have to be safe all the time."
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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Alberta Increasing Inspections of Family Construction Projects

Alberta’s Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) officers are increasing inspections of single and multi-family construction projects in Alberta, as the third of three planned focused inspections for 2011. 
 
Throughout the province, we’re beginning to see an increase in new home construction. We need to ensure safety on these job sites is a priority,” said Employment and Immigration Minister Thomas Lukaszuk. “I’ve said all year long that increased attention on residential construction projects was on my to-do list. Today’s the day.” (WCxKit)
 
 
In 2010, almost 1,700 inspections of Alberta’s residential construction sector resulted in 1,000 orders being issued. A lack of proper fall protection topped the list of infractions, followed by issues with hazard assessments, safeguards, and clear entrances, walkways and stairways.
 
 
Once the focused inspections and re-inspections are complete and the results are tabulated, the findings will be shared with Albertans. These will include the number of sites visited, the total number of inspections, and the number and types of orders issued. 
 
 
Several officers will be wholly dedicated to this campaign.” said Lukaszuk. “My message to Alberta’s home builders and their contractors is that we are on our way.”
Information on workplace injuries in the construction sector is available at: employment.alberta.ca/documents/WHS/WHS-PUB-oid-acsa.pdf.
 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


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Alberta Study on Effect of Dust Fumes on Female Workers

A study underway at the University of Alberta (Canada) may offer more detail on health effects that exposure to welding fumes and metal dust have on women in metalworking and electrical trades, according to a report from Canadian OH&S News.
 
 
The research project, called "Women's Health in Alberta Trades – Metalworking and Electricians" (WHAT-ME), is a collaboration among researchers from the UoA, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology and the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training. It targets women in the province who have taken part in apprenticeship training in one of the relevant trades at any time during the last five years. (WCxKit)
 
 
Some 180 women, of which approximately10 are pregnant, have been recruited for the study. Apart from reproductive health, the study will also analyze health issues surrounding respiratory health, skin problems, nickel sensitization and musculoskeletal problems.
 
 
The initial motivation came from the Canadian Standards Association (CSA), which has raised concerns about possible health risks to pregnant welders who are exposed to welding fumes.
 
 
David Hisey, chair of the safety committee on welding, cutting and allied processes for the CSA, says that there is a need for an "increased level of safety" considering more female welders are entering the workforce in Western Canada. "We want to make sure we know the hazards that we are putting our kids into and if there's more protection that needs to be provided for all workers, then we need to be looking at that," he commented.
 
 
A 2008 study from Finland discovered that maternal exposure to welding fumes or metal dusts during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm delivery and reduce intrauterine growth.
 
 
There was also some suggestive, but inconsistent, evidence that the risk of preterm delivery and reduced fetal growth is related to paternal exposure to welding fumes, the paper notes. Results were gleaned from observations of 1,670 women who worked during pregnancy, of which 68 (four per cent) were exposed to either welding fumes or metal dusts or fumes. (WCxKit)
 
 
The paper discovered that nitrogen oxide, a compound present in welding fumes and/or metal dusts, was identified as a compound responsible for low birth weight and spontaneous abortion among dental assistants. "Prenatal exposure to [a] complex mixture of combustion products, emissions from unvented or poorly vented stoves and ambient air pollution may also increase the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes," the paper notes.
 
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.
 
 
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

Alberta Amps Up Workplace Safety Inspections To Reduce Teen Injuries

The Alberta government has unveiled another set of workplace safety inspections, this time focusing on young employees.
 
 
According to The Edmonton Journal, Employment and Immigration Minister Thomas Lukaszuk said teams of Occupational Health and Safety inspectors will perform random inspections “up and above” regular inspections over the next month in places where young people usually work, such as in the retail, restaurant or construction sectors. (WCxKit)
 
 
The inspections come at a time when Lukaszuk said many “young and inexperienced workers” will enter the workforce, as high school and university students finish school and start their summer jobs or new profession. Lukaszuk noted statistics indicate young people are more prone to injuries on the job.
 
 
They’re not accustomed to industrial environment,” he said. From 2006 to 2010, workers aged 15 to 24; roughly, 18 percent of lost-time claims filed from all workers filed 27,166 lost-time claims. Thirty-seven young people died on the job over this time, ministry statistics indicate.
 
 
J. Percy Page High School sends approximately 30 students a year into the workforce through the Registered Apprenticeship Program, coordinator James Anderson. The program allows high school students to go to school while working as an apprentice in a registered trade. Anderson welcomed the new round of inspections, saying they will add to the safety training and job site safety assessment the school provides as required by Alberta Learning. “It’s never a bad thing to have extra eyes when it comes to safety,” he said.
 
 
Lukaszuk said the inspections are also a push toward a total “culture change” where workplace safety is “second nature.” Gary Wagar, executive director of the Alberta Construction Safety Association, said workplace safety would be more achievable with ongoing safety inspections, not “safety blitzes” like this one or the one in February on forklift use. “What happens in between is complacency sets in,” said Wagar.
 
 
Gil McGowan, president of the Alberta Federation of Labor, remarked, “blitzes must be backed with more concrete action, including ongoing random inspections.” More inspectors are required for ongoing inspections. There are presently 102 inspectors in Alberta, up from 87 one year ago. The government is expected to add 10 inspectors each year for the next three years. (WCxKit)
 
 
When this set of inspections is complete, Lukaszuk indicated he would publicly share the findings.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Welding Poses Greater Risk to Infants and Females than Males

If welding is dangerous for males in the eyes of some, what are the potential hazards for women who decide to enter this line of work?
 
 
According to a report from The Edmonton Journal, a study from Finland three years ago suggests babies of women and their male partners, if either worked as welders, were born small for the gestation period or premature, much like findings usually noted with mothers who smoked while pregnant. The study, however, was not definitive due to the fact it looked at the birth of only 13 babies. (WCxKit)
 
 
Given that information, the Canadian Standards Association’s (CSA) safety committee has asked a pair of University of Alberta professors in occupational medicine to do the research. Their project is called the What-Me (Women’s Health in Alberta Trades — Metalworking and Electricians) study. Metalworking jobs include welders, pipe fitters, steamfitters and boilermakers.
 
 
Numbers show there are 1,800 women working in these untraditional trades in Alberta and lead researchers Nicola Cherry, who heads the occupational medicine program at the U of A and Jeremy Beach, want as many of them as possible to take part in the study.
 
 
The researchers will follow the women for at least two years, keeping an eye on their health and searching for any effects possibly tied to their work, including pregnancy problems, according to Cherry.
 
 
The women who have so far signed up for the study, ranging from 18 to 60 years of age, have noted concerns regarding what their trades jobs are doing to their health.
 
 
For example, welders of both sexes, can develop respiratory problems and metal-fume fever (similar to the flu), and arc welders can have issues with their eyes and skin. (WCxKit)
 
 
The U of A study will provide another source of information, that when all are compiled, will allow more informed decisions about what if any health hazards are tied to the job women are doing in metalworking and electrical trades.
 
 
Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.
 
 
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Alberta Workplaces Lack Fall Protection and Proper Safeguarding

Albertas workplace safety prosecution record is drawing fire, as new numbers indicate significantly fewer cases were taken to court last year than in Saskatchewan, with a workforce one-quarter the size of Albertas.
 
 
According to the Calgary Herald, Alberta finalized prosecutions on 11 workplace safety cases in 2010. Saskatchewan, meanwhile, has completed 47 cases since its fiscal year started nine months ago.
 
 
Throughout the past decade, Alberta consistently had one of the highest worker fatality rates in the country, spiking at 166 deaths three years ago. Yet a Herald study last year showed prosecutions of workplace safety violations were all but non-existent.
 
 
Alberta Employment Minister Thomas Lukaszuk reports his workplace investigators forward cases to Crown lawyers for review but, as a politician, he can't advocate for charges, even when safety infractions are discovered.
 
 
Both Alberta and Saskatchewan rely on similar legal tests when deciding whether to issue occupational safety charges, asking: Is the case in the public interest and is there a reasonable likelihood of conviction?
 
 
Questioned on whether hes concerned regarding the perception that Alberta is reluctant to take employers who break safety laws to court, Lukaszuk indicated he's not fixated on the prosecution rate.
 
 
"Justice is not a numbers game," the employment minister remarked. "At the end of the day, Im not in the business of generating numbers of prosecutions. Im not in the business of convictions. I'm in the business of making sure that every Albertan comes home safe at the end of the shift."
 
 
Alberta Employment statistics indicate worker deaths last year were ahead of the previous years pace. With two months left to count, 111 employees died in 2010, compared with 85 during the same stretch in 2009.
 
 
The province not long ago revamped its workplace safety enforcement system, hiring additional inspectors, posting company safety records online, and targeting high-risk industries for safety blitzes.
 
 
Last month, Albertas employment minister expressed disgust at the results of an inspection blitz of Alberta construction sites.
 
 
For six weeks in October and November, provincial workplace officers paid calls on 73 commercial construction sites involving 146 employers in Calgary, Edmonton and other parts of Alberta. In all, 214 safety violations were found.
 
 
Top hazards involved working at heights without adequate fall protection and failing to properly safeguard against threats, like openings in floors.


Author Robert Elliott
, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information.  Contact:  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

 
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Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

CANADA Alberta Targets Commercial Construction Site Safety

In a continuing bid to improve its health and safety record, Alberta's labor minister has announced that a safety blitz targeting commercial construction sites will take place in the province.

The blitz
, which was announced and initiated earlier this month, will take place for at least a month and will target commercial construction projects over five storeys, confirms Chris Chodan, a spokesman for Alberta Employment and Immigration (AEI) in Edmonton. "We've had a number of incidents, primarily in the Calgary area, but there have been one or two incidents in other cities," he says. "We thought it was just a good idea to make this a reminder to employers." (WCxKit)

The increased inspections
will focus on ensuring that proper fall protection is in place and that workers have secured all materials when working at heights. Chodan reports that the blitz has been dedicated to the memory of Michelle Krsek, a three-year-old girl who was killed last year after metal sheets fell on her while she was walking down a Calgary street with her family.

The enforcement blitz
is in line with the province's 10-point safety plan, released in July, which promised to implement updated compliance and enforcement procedures. Robin Kotyk, chief operating officer of the Alberta Construction Safety Association in Edmonton, suggests that the blitz will be "beneficial to the industry," but argues that it is needed in all sectors

Construction
, he suggests, is a particularly visible industry, which makes it a strong candidate for a high-profile blitz. "Construction is basically in the forefront of your observations when you drive down streets. It's out there," he says.  

Ron Harry
, executive director of the Building Trades of Alberta, which represents over 60,000 construction union members province-wide, also endorses the blitz. "You're going to have a lot of workplaces that are safety oriented, but you're going to have those that are not, and that's the enforcement part of that," he suggests.

While Harry
supports the blitz, he is opposed to the idea of on-the-spot ticketing for workers, an idea that Minister Thomas Lukaszuk is currently considering. "Right off the top of my head," Harry says, "I'm not in favor of fining employees simply because the employees are subordinate to the employers."

But Bob Robinson
, president and general manager of Westcor Construction in Calgary, argues that both parties are potentially liable for safety violations. "There's always the human element that's part of the equation and tough to put your finger on," he notes.

If a worker is found to have
been properly trained, he suggests, the individual error should be corrected. "If individuals can be ticketed for not working safely, putting themselves or others in danger, if they're aware that that's a possibility, there is a handful out there that needs that motivation."

However, he points out
, employers must be held to the same standard. "If the company just hasn't looked, if the worker hasn't been told, hasn't been orientated… the company's at blame, and they should be ticketed."

Kotyk supports both increased enforcement
and ticketing, as well as a renewed focus on education for both workers and employers, endorsing "education of the workforce in general, education of the owners themselves on what they need to know for compliance." If a worker or employer is found to be in violation of a safety regulation, he says, they should be given the chance to receive education on the subject, and if it recurs, a fine should be levied.

Harry, however, suggests that
the industry move away from assessing safety according to what he calls a behavior-based system. "The environment itself on a job site, each and every thing that occurs on that job site, whether it be the actions of the employer, whether it be the actions of someone delivering material…all contribute to the safety factor," he argues.

In August
, Robinson and the Calgary Construction Association published a best-practices guide for construction sites in the city, focusing on four areas of safety: hoarding of a construction or demolition site; managing vehicular and pedestrian traffic adjacent to sites; lifting and hoisting operations; and securing construction materials and equipment on site. (WCxKit)
 
The guide represents "the accumulation of ideas from over 1,000 man-years of hands-on construction experience from a great number of companies, specifically focused on the interface between construction sites and the public," Robinson reports.

 

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact:  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.
 
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New South Wales Winery Fined $125,000 in Death of Employee

A Riverina (Australia) winery has been fined a total of $125,000 in the NSW Industrial Court following the death of a worker at the winery in 2008.

Leeton-based
Toorak Winery Pty Ltd was found guilty of a breach of section 8(1) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000 (NSW) by Justice Haylen after WorkCover NSW commenced prosecution proceedings.

The worker
was emptying grape juice and skins (known as marc) from a Potter overhead fermentation tank into a mobile bin when the rapid discharge of contents from the tank caused the bin to move and crush the worker. (WCxKit)

The Court
heard that the winery failed to provide safe plant for use by employees and failed to provide and maintain a safe system of work. It also heard that it didn’t conduct an adequate risk assessment or provide employees with adequate information, instruction and training in relation to the use and operation of the plant.

Justice Haylen’s
judgment said the offence highlighted the importance of employers conducting regular and detailed workplace risk assessments.

It also said
it highlighted the level of ongoing diligence required of employers and the danger of being lulled into a false sense of security due to a lack of adverse or dangerous events.

General Manager
of WorkCover NSW’s Occupational Health and Safety Division, John Watson said the case reinforced the need for wineries to have effective safety controls in place for the harvesting of grapes.

“Every worker
has the right to expect that they will return home safely to their loved ones at the end of their working day,” Watson said.

“All wineries
should have safety controls in place which specifically address the emptying overhead fermenter tanks, draining of juice and the discharge of marc from tanks.”

WorkCover NSW
has developed a Wine Industry Safety Strategy to promote safety, and reduce fatalities and serious injuries in the sector.

A Wine Industry Safety
Group comprised of WorkCover NSW, the NSW Wine Industry Association, union and key industry players has been established to coordinate the development and implementation of the Strategy. 

The Strategy
has involved the delivery of 43 workplace advisory and compliance visits in the Riverina, Hunter and Central NSW. It has also involved the development and delivery of five practical, on-site workshops to provide industry with information, guidance and advice. (WCxKit)


WorkCover NSW
has commenced a review of the Wine Industry Code of Practice of OH&S in consultation with the Wine Industry Safety Group. At the completion of the review a Wine Safety Industry Guide will be developed and number of workshops held to assist wineries in implementing the reviewed Code of Practice.

Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact:  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.
 
FREE TOOLS
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SUBSCRIBE: Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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