Medical and Risk Trends for 2013

 

Each new year brings talk and speculation about what will be the “next big thing” during that year — a new medical procedure; a new change in laws; or increases in disability and reserving. Some common themes popping up on blogs and in discussion threads are about medical procedures and distracted driving hazard effecting risk management.
 
1.   Aggressive Total/Partial Joint Replacement Surgeries
 
Hip and knee joint replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the United States, according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Between 1996 and 2006, total hip replacements increased by one third and total knee replacements by 70%.
 
Part of this new trend means doctors are finally realizing that months and months of physical therapy and other treatments are not resulting in outcomes patients’ desire. Injured people want to regain as nearly as possible most of their mobility and activity levels they enjoyed prior to an injury. This is particularly true of injuries taking years to develop before the joint finally gives out.
 
In addition, technology has changed, implants are better, more functional, and last longer and, depending on the comorbidities of the patient, recovery times have lessened. Therefore, physicians are going directly to joint replacement surgery, rather than waste a year on therapy.
 
Employers need to be aware of the actual causal relationship of joint failure to the issue of a workers compensation injury, keeping in mind most joint replacements are due to degenerative changes, not necessarily an occupational injury. The decision of whether or not an employer is liable for a workers comp claim can vary by state statute, meaning be very aware of all state statutes in every state where your company operates.
 
Rarely will a carrier opt to pick up a case with a joint replacement recommendation, since the costs are high, and the outcomes for total success can be limited. Be prepared to argue any case where a physician leans toward joint replacement following a workplace injury. Look for possible pre-existing conditions and be sure to have an independent medical examination (IME) done by a qualified and reputable physician.
 
 
2.   Increasingly Sophisticated Bionic Implants/Prosthetics
 
Great outcomes are rare for severe occupational injuries that include the loss of a limb since these cases are catastrophic in nature and carry a massive dollar reserve. The days of peg legs and hooks for hands are gone. Current prosthetics are capable of grasping objects with a mind/body connection doing the work, rather than plain mechanics.
 
Prosthetic limb advancements have grown exponentially over the years, but are very expensive. Prosthetic hands and arms are now like mini computers, with sophisticated wiring and performance. This leads to increased hazards and damage, wear and tear, and replacement/maintenance costs.
 
Some state statues only require replacement of a lost limb with a “suitable” prosthetic. But suitable to whom? Is it suitable to the claims adjuster, or suitable to the person affected by this life-changing injury? Unfortunately in many insurance claims, the best is not always something the carrier is prepared to pay for. The carrier’s opinion is to replace with a suitable device, a Ford Focus, not a Cadillac Escalade or Ferrari. So a lost limb can be replaced by the Ford Focus of limbs, not the Cadillac of prosthetic devices, or the latest/greatest thing out there.
 
Prosthetic eyes have also come a long way from the days when eye implants were riddled with infection potential and replacement eyes had little reality to what a natural eye looked like. Today’s eye prosthetics are incredibly life-like, although they do not replace vision. However, a good-looking prosthetic eye is a confidence builder and beneficial to a good appearance.
 
Be prepared to litigate over the issue of “type of replacement” and do not be surprised when it arrives after coverage for the Cadillac version of a prosthetic is disputed. Avoid legal problems by doing due diligence and get multiple opinions and recommendations for treatment as well as estimates on maintenance costs/repairs.
 
 
  1. Changing Demographics of the Workforce
 
Today businesses are doing more with less, leading to employees who are prone to more severe injuries with longer recovery times. Both the increase in obesity and aging adds to this statistic. It is not uncommon for workers compensation claims to increase when layoffs are rumored or forthcoming. Fear of losing a job may cause an employee to file a workers compensation claim over a minor injury and this spells disaster for the employer.
 
Employers must be aware of the risk. Every employer wants to run an efficient business, but employees can be over loaded by being asked to do more with less. What is the general consensus on the work floor? Are workers hearing about pending layoffs and not telling their managers about a potential injury for fear of repercussion or termination? Are workers asked to do more than one job when coworkers are laid off and not replaced? Failure to address these important questions can be dangerous and costly in the end and counter-productive to efficient management.
 
 
  1. Better Recovery that Limits Risk of Permanent Partial Impairment
 
Injuries reported and treated before they morph into major injuries result in reduced recovery time. Reduced recovery time lessens the risk of a permanent injury. In states where an impairment rating is used to pay the claimant additional monies, just opening the lines of communication can save a business/carrier a large sum of money over time.
 
Let us look at carpal tunnel as an example of early treatment as opposed to late treatment.
When a worker is treated at the onset of symptoms, treatment consists of splinting and medication. The problem can resolve on its own with little loss of work time and minimal medical cost. On the other hand, the longer a worker waits to get treatment, the worse the nerves become damaged, sometimes to the point where surgery will be of little benefit to resolve pain and restore function.
 
Some states have an almost automatic impairment rating once surgery is performed and costs can be very large not only in additional wage loss, but also in increased medical coverage. Some states cover reasonable, related, and necessary medical costs over a 10-year period, meaning it is hard to wipe an existing claim of this nature off the financial books. Promote early involvement/medical intervention when an injury happens in the workplace.
 
 
Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com
 
Author Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com
 
©2013 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.  

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

Ergonomic Concerns With An Aging Workforce

There has been a lot of industry talk about the risk of an aging workforce and how this can affect your workers compensation program. A main risk is how ergonomics plays into injury prevention, not only for an aging worker but for all workers.

 

Here are several ergonomic issues, and ways to try to trim your exposure:

 

 

Why should employers be concerned about this issue?

 

I recently read in the paper where it is projected that 50% of workers expect to work into their 70s, some into their 80s, and some plan to never retire! The reasons for such a statement would vary per the individual needs of the person, so it is hard to say exactly why this phenomenon is occurring.

 

Truly there are a number of different factors all combined into why this is happening, I do not think it is solely due to financial needs, or solely due to people just liking to work and be out of the house, on so on. The reality is that it seems there are older workers out there who just are not removing themselves from the workforce. Whether or not this will change in the future is unknown, but the current trend is that workers are not in a hurry to retire.

 

 

 

What are the risk factors?

 

Ergonomics are intended to maximize worker productivity while minimizing fatigue and discomfort. When work stations are designed based on production demand and not on the human element, the result will be increased injury. Worker injury exposure should look at the overall ability of the worker performing the job. It could loosely be said that a 75 year old worker cannot perform as quick nor have the physical stamina of a 25 year old worker. But, you have to take into account worker experience, motivation to perform at a high capacity, overall occupational education, and so on. This would be the human factor of a particular job. Job station risks would include repetitive motion, awkward postures such as bending/stooping and overreaching for items are all ergonomic workstation factors.

 

When a worker is manually handling heavy objects, it forces the body to comply and this can cause injury. An aging workforce most likely cannot continue to meet strict production demands that stress the body at a high capacity without experiencing injury at some point.

 

 

 

How can I reduce the risk?

 

The best thing for employers to do is to contact ergonomists and/or risk control professionals for their expertise on how to control and reduce the risk of ergonomically related claims. Many insurance carriers have adequately trained risk professionals that can help, or they can refer you to an outside vendor for further expertise.

Employers can also start to look at work duties and tasks for all of their employees. They should bear in mind necessary accommodations for an aging worker in a high demand, fast-paced work station.

 

Employers can also use loss run data to look for injury trends in order to pinpoint a particular task that could be increasing injury risk. As well as accommodate the needs of older workers by providing increased breaks, job rotations, sitting options, etc.

 

 

Any other ideas that will help out?

 

Depending on the work demand, a key topic that is having proper footwear and using correct body mechanics when handling materials.

 

Workplace footwear should be slip-resistant and designed for standing on concrete or other hard surfaces for long periods of time within the work environment. Anti-fatigue mats used with the correct footwear reduces pain and fatigue to the back and lower extremities, thereby reducing some injury exposure.

 

Establishing proper body mechanics defined by job description help not only an aging workforce, but all employees, on how to properly handle materials with minimal impact to the vulnerable areas of the body.

 

 

Summary

 

The increased presence of an aging workforce presents new exposure to an employer that was not as prevalent in the past. It is important to be proactive, and to become involved in the injury exposure in order to reduce your risk. Talk with your vendors or your carrier about what options you have for reducing your exposure.

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Editor Michael B. Stack, CPA, Director of Operations, Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is an expert in employer communication systems and part of the Amaxx team helping companies reduce their workers compensation costs by 20% to 50%. He is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

©2013 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 


Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional about workers comp issues.

7 Ways to Build Better Work Habits and Build Cooperation

As members of a management team, around the winter season, reevaluate for the upcoming year.  Set goals, benchmarks, implement new techniques, purchase new materials, etc.  But there is one area that seems to be focused on more than others: And that is ‘how can we use what we have to be better?’.

 
Chances are in a medium to large shop, there is plenty of talent, in more than one form.  The workers can be your most important capital. So why not focus on how to better use that talent? (WCxKit)
 
 
1.  Provide the best tools so employees can perform efficiently
As an example, if you drive cars, this does not mean that all all drive a top of the line Cadillac.  But this is meant more to show how to provide the best output for workers.  Make workstations adjustable so workers can perform at the levels they need to.  This will increase output and performance, not to mention that it will make workers less prone to injury, especially in repetitive-motion workstations. Extra lighting can provide clarity and precision. Hand trucks and dollies can make moving heavy materials easier and quicker, and so on and so on.
 
 
2. Don't run it like a prison
The workplace does not have to run hard-nosed and rigid.  As an employer allows some flexibility such as flex work hours, rotating job tasks, allowing hourly breaks, then you can best utilize workers time at work for production.  A rested workforce is your best workforce.  Sometimes having job rotation can provide breaks for those that do heavy duty work day in and day out.  Also  this can reduce injury since those workers that just do heavy lifting or moving of materials can get a much needed break from time to time throughout the day.  You could also discover that one of your workers may be better suited for another type of job task, versus the one they are currently in now.  This could lead to increased production, and better efficiency. 
 
 
3.  Keep an open mind
Time and time again we recommend listening to employees and their suggestions as to how changes can be made to make production better.  Discuss alternative job tasks and how things could be done quicker and easier.  Remember these are the people that do these jobs all day, sometimes for years.  They have ideas and suggestions and you have to make management become approachable.  If someone knows that you will take the time to listen to them, you may get an idea that  you can implement.  Not everyone will hit the ball out of the park every time, but you could stumble upon something that can really make a difference, and it could change the way things are done on a daily basis.
 
 
4.  Encourage healthy lifestyles and reward those that make a change
A healthy body is one that comes ready and able to work, and able to take on the challenges of the day.  Healthier employees also have less sick time away from work, and have fewer injuries.  A lot of companies now offer discounts to local gyms, reduced medical premiums for wellness exams, smoking cessation programs for free, etc.  The HR department probably has a lot of ideas and plans that are already in place to promote a healthier lifestyle, and the incentive programs to go with it, so check in to some of them and try to implement some over the course of a year.  Provide some incentives for the workers to participate, and see what happens.  I bet that more will participate than you thought.
 
 
5.  Launch a return to work program
It has been well documented that the longer a person is out of work, the harder it is to get them back to productive employment and there is a strong correlation between a high return to work ratio and a low mod.  Older employees also take longer to heal than younger ones, so consider home-based employment.  If you provide some light duty work, employees know that even though they have an injury, they can still work and make a decent wage.  This will help them transition back into full time work once they are released from medical care, and will reduce claims dollars that are spent on lost wages while injured.  It will also free up full duty employees to do something more productive, while those with medical restrictions can take care of the lighter tasks you need done day in and day out. Make a "wish list" of tasks you wish you had someone to help perform, then use the wish list to create transitional duty tasks. For instance, I wish I had someone to proofread my writing.
 
 
6.  Set up a mentoring program
It is always hard to start a new job.  Nobody wants to be the new person, so set up a mentoring program to help those new or less-experienced employees. Shadowing programs work well also. The new employee can gain some great knowledge from the veteran worker, including how to do things quicker, properly, and more efficiently. A good mentoring program will improve productivity of the newer, younger employees while making veteran workers feel like they can contribute more to the company other than just cranking out their job tasks day after day.  The more you make workers feel like they are involved, the better, harder, and more dedicated they will work for you.
 
 
7. Do not be afraid to hire experienced workers
There are many benefits to hiring experienced workers. These workers already have sound work habits, years of experience in the field, and the skills the company needs to take you to the next level of competition.  These workers also have less out of work distractions, such as needing more time off for child care or more time off for school commitments.  Experienced workers will also add some diversity in workforce, contributing their ideas and experience to the team projects and ideas.  If you utilize their assets, the workplace will benefit. (WCxKit)
 
 
Summary
A New Year means it is time to reflect on the year to date, and focus on what you can do better for the upcoming New Year.  But you should also think about what the veteran workers can bring to the table for the company.  Experienced workers are a great untapped resource, and their ideas and work ethics can be beneficial in more ways than one, especially in fields other than just being at their workstation.  Tap the greatest free resource- the employees.  Listen to their ideas, and make the management team approachable when someone has an idea about how something may be able to be done better.  If you make this one of several things to focus on, accomplishing the rest of the goals could just be that much easier.

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Manage Your Workers Compensation: Reduce Costs 20-50% www.WCManual.com. Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.
 

WORKERS COMP BOOK for BROKERS and AGENTS:  www.WCManual.com
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact 

Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

5 Ways an Aging Workforce Can Lead to Risk and Reward

 

According to data on labor-force participation from the U.S. Current Population Survey available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics between 2005 and 2010, the number of employees in the U.S. aged 55 to 64 increased 52%. So if an employer has a majority of its workforce in this age range, it is reasonable to say there is an associated risk. But there are positives as well. Below we discuss these issues — positive and negative.
 
 
1. An older workforce at your plant can lead to fewer claims
Many smaller employers and plants can have a great loss run report. Workplaces with a loyal workforce and little turnover in a smaller facility can run well. A smaller plant may have only two to three dozen employees. A majority of these workers likely have been employees for over 15-20 years and remain loyal. They have survived buyouts, layoffs, decreased demand, and economic woes. They took the layoffs and returned back to work when needed. They did whatever tasks  were asked of them. They know how to do multiple jobs, run multiple machines, and handle different orders as needed. (WCxKit)
 
 
These senior-level workers are reliable. They do the safety checks. They can run and maintain their machines in their sleep. They rarely get injured because of years of practicing safety standards. They know not to cut corners.  When one of these workers is injured, they want to get back to work. But often this generation of worker has complicated injuries.
 
 
2. But when older workers are injured it leads to longer, more severe claims
This senior-level workforce often makes high wages.  When they get injured, the wage loss component can account for a big cost associated with lost-time comp claims. Being off work for a month can cost two to three times more than the associated medical costs. By keeping a light duty work program in place, employers can save some expenses.
 
 
Shoulder, knee, and back injuries can be particularly severe and often  require surgery. These body parts withstand decades of work-related wear and tear. The adjuster has to determine if the injury is work related or due to non-occupational factors. Levels of arthritis, degenerative disc disease, and degenerative ligament tearing are factors. What the employee was doing during the injury is also key. Is this a repetitive motion injury or an acute injury? Or is this an injury related to age that happens to occur in the workplace? The golden rule of workers comp is “Just because an injury happens at work does not mean it is actually caused by work duties.”
 
 
If an employee’s back gives out at work, this does not necessarily equate to full granted workers compensation benefits. The adjuster must do a complete, thorough, and often long investigation to maintain ethical accuracy. As long as the adjuster is given all the information needed and questions answered, the correct judgment will be made.
 
 
Older employees may feel an injury is work related. After all they have never had a claim or a surgery until now. Now they are off work and frustrated with the recovery process. They are afraid of surgery. And if the claim is denied, legal costs can mount. This high level of employee will fight, and  will not take a workers compensation denial lightly. Especially if the employee feels entitled to benefits after all the years on the job. These employees will often obtain legal counsel to explore options, so the adjuster must cover all bases.  
 
 
3. Identify issues and reduce risk
While older workers generally have fewer workplace injuries, they are often more costly to treat. In addition, they tend to be away from work almost twice as long as their younger coworkers. By understanding the aging process and its impact on workers comp claims, adjusters and employers can help better protect employees from injury. Risks and trends should be identified on the work floor. As previously mentioned, tailoring workstations to your workers to encourage safety and production is crucial. Talking to workers to help the employer identify issues before they become a potential hazard is a positive way to use worker feedback.
 
 
4. New technology can spike claims so focus on retraining and safety
New technology can cause frustration and disruption to a daily work routine the worker has done for years. The employee may not be open to this at first. So training and safety are even more crucial. Without it, injuries can and will occur. Follow up with consistent training to reduce the risk and threat of injury.(WCxKit)
 
 
Summary
The most experienced workers can be an employer’s greatest asset. But if they become injured, they can become the greatest insurance cost. By keeping them involved, keeping them trained, and keeping them focused on safety, employers can avoid and prevent injury while and keep older workers on the work floor working.
 

Author Rebecca Shafer
, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing, publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.


Our WORKERS COMP BOOK:
www.wcmanual.com

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:  www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

The Aging Workforce and Workers Compensation Webinar – TUESDAY December 14 2010

THE AGING WORKFORCE WEBINAR (FREE)
Prepare your company
and your department for the maturing of America’s workforce. Join us for information on accommodating your aging employee population.
 
In 2000, there were 18.2 million workers over the age of 55 in America.

In 2008, there were 25.2 million, a 38% increase.
In 2025, AARP estimates there will be 31.9 million, a 75% increase.


The presentation covers:
 
– An overview of our country’s aging demographics and what it will mean for your company.
– The ramifications of these growing numbers on operations.
– Safety issues for older employees and customers.
– Controlling workers compensation costs.
– Ways to return more mature employees to work.
AGING UP
A WEBEX ON WORKING WITH MATURE EMPLOYEES
December 14, 2010 at 11:00 AM EST 
 

Register: LeTascia LaRue at letascia_larue@choosebroadspire.com or call: 404-300-1602 to Register. 
 

Contributor: Broadside: Providing workers compensation third-party administrative services. For more information, contact Broadspire by calling 1-866-625-1662 or email us at Broadspire_Info@choosebroadspire.com;  http:// www.choosebroadspire.

 

WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
JOIN THE WC DISCUSSION:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/
SUBSCRIBE: 
Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact
Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

The Aging Workforce and Workers Compensation Webinar – THURSDAY November 18, 2010

THE AGING WORKFORCE WEBINAR  (FREE)
Register NOW for Tomorrow!
From:       Broadspire_info@choosebroadspire.com
Subject:  What are you doing about America’s aging workforce?

AGING UP
A WEBEX ON WORKING WITH MATURE EMPLOYEES
November 18th, 11:00 AM EST 
 
In 2000, there were 18.2 million workers over the age of 55 in America.
In 2008, there were 25.2 million, a 38% increase.
In 2025, AARP estimates there will be 31.9 million, a 75% increase.
 
Prepare your company and your department for the maturing of America’s workforce. Join us for information on accommodating your aging employee population.
 
The presentation covers:
– An overview of our country’s aging demographics and what it will mean for your company
– The ramifications of these growing numbers on operations
– Safety issues for older employees and customers
– Controlling workers compensation costs
– Ways to return more mature employees to work
 
FREE Registration: Broadspire_info@choosebroadspire.com or Call 1-866-625-1662. 
 
WORK COMP CALCULATOR:   http://www.LowerWC.com/calculator.php
 
JOIN LINKEDIN GROUP:  http://www.linkedin.com/groups?homeNewMember=&gid=1922050/
NEWSLETTER: 
Workers Comp Resource Center Newsletter

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.

©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact
Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Physical Ability is Major Consideration of Our Aging Workforce

 

One of the major  considerations for the aging workforce is the lower capacity for sustained activity.  When the limits are reached fatigue sets in and productivity decreases and errors increase.

 

As such,  the ergonomist must use ergonomic principles to design or re-design tasks to decrease the risk of fatigue. To help the ergonomist determine whether the older worker may be at risk, the following measurements should be included in the analysis of performance:

 

  1. Heart Rate (above 100 BPM indicates aerobic level of function).
    2.  Blood Pressure  (139/89 is the maximum reading for pre-hypertensive cases. If a worker reaches this level they should be referred to their physician).
    3.  Individual perceptions of stress. This third metric can be ascertained using such tools as the BORG Scale of perceived patient exertion. A chart is placed in front of the worker while doing a physical task and they rate their perception of exertion. Values of 7-9 reflect light work, 13-17 is hard work and anything above 18 is considered maximum exercise capacity. Readings in the 14-16 reach correlated with the anaerobic threshold.

 

By determining  these values on selected physically demanding tasks, a better level of function without over stressing the worker can be reached and recommended. (workersxzcompxzkit)

 

It is interesting  to note that according to a survey conducted by the National Council on Compensation Insurance, younger workers actually have a higher incident rate of workplace injury on average than older workers.  Older workers do have a higher cost per claim, but this is multi-factorial and include issues such as higher average wages, claim duration, and the number of medical treatments.  The research by the NCCI show that age is becoming less of a difference.  AARP also published a study in 2007 which revealed that expert knowledge of our older workers can offset the impact of old age in some occupations.  (workersxzcompxzkit)

 

As our country  faces workforce challenges our older workers should be considered for their expertise, knowledge and experience.  Hosting an older workforce requires consideration of the physical limitations as an offset for what they are able to bring to the table.  By evaluating the ergonomic aspect of the position, one can reduce the risk of workplace fatigue and maintain productivity.

 

If you do not  have training in taking these types of measurements, you must defer to a medical professional.

 

Author Victoria Powell  is the President of VP Medical Consulting, LLC located in Central Arkansas.  VP Medical Consulting is a nurse consulting firm providing services to employers, insurance companies, attorneys and the general public.  Services include case management, life care planning, legal nurse consulting, ergonomics and patient advocacy.  Ms. Powell holds specialty certifications in a variety of nursing specialties.  She can be reached through the web at http://www.vp-medical.com

 

“FRAUD PREVENTION” PODCAST click here: http://www.workerscompkit.com/gallagher/mp3
By: Private investigator with 25 years experience

TD Calculator: www.ReduceYourWorkersComp.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php
WC Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker about workers’ comp issues.

©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

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Learn How to Reduce Workers Comp Costs 20% to 50%"Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%"
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