5 Key Terms That Define Professional Administration Contracts

ametrosSetting up support with professional administration of medical funds after settlement is a clear choice.  It helps the injured person save money on their healthcare expenses and provides support in navigating ongoing care. The service is especially helpful for Medicare Set Asides because the administrator helps ensure the injured person’s Medicare benefits remain intact while protecting the injured worker, their attorney, as well as the payor from any potential mishaps.  In fact, Medicare “highly recommends” that injured individuals use a professional administrator after settlement.  (What is professional administration? Learn more)

 

When it comes to administration, all involved should have a thorough understanding of the administrator’s role and how it benefits the injured person. What can sometimes be less obvious is how to set up the administered account with an agreement that adequately governs it and how administration fits into and facilitates settlements.  The following concepts are essential to understand these agreements.

 

 

1. Who is involved? Parties to the Agreement 

 

Ideally, the agreement is between the injured person (also known as the “member”) and the administrator. It’s useful to get to know the administrator involved and to see if it is independent and truly has the best interests of the injured individual at heart. Conducting some background research, contacting the administrator directly, and asking for references are good starting points.

 

Tip: Be aware of administrators that operate other lines of related business.  This could create a conflict; for instance, if they work for the carrier/employer to provide low estimates of future medical allocation amounts, it does not make sense that they are also offering to work for the injured person to help them maximize their medical settlement funds.

 

The cleanest arrangement is a bilateral agreement between the administrator and the injured person where the administrator is focused on its duty to protect the injured person.

 

 

2. The Purpose of the Agreement / Responsibilities of the Administrator

 

The administration agreement should outline the benefits and services the administrator will provide.  These often include:

 

  • Placing the settlement funds in a separate, interest-bearing bank account under the member’s name
  • Securing discounts on medical bills where possible and paying medical bills on the member’s behalf
  • Tracking and providing complete reporting on all expenses
  • Filing any required government reports, such as Medicare Set Aside reporting

 

The responsibilities of the administrator should be clearly outlined.  If it is determined that the administrator is going to do something extra or different for the member, this should be included in the agreement.

 

 

3. The Bank Account

 

The administration agreement should provide detail on how the member account will be established. For utmost security, it should be a separate, individual bank account established in the name of the member.  In unique situations where the settlement is funded into a special needs trust, then the account may be required to be setup in the name and Tax ID number of the trust to ensure government benefits are protected.

 

Often times, included in the administration agreement is the standard information the bank requires. With complete security, the administrator is the custodian of the account and must authorize any disbursement.

 

Tip: The safest account is a separate checking or savings account. Be careful of any pooling of the injured person’s funds with money from other clients. This can have significant consequences because it:

 

  1. may result in their funds being invested in less liquid assets or that are at risk of losing value.  (Investment losses are not an appropriate use of MSA funds)
  2. may result in the loss of FDIC insurance of $250,000
  3. means their money and will likely be tracked manually by the administrator instead of the bank which could potentially lead to mistakes 

 

It’s important to know the member’s money is deposited at a reputable bank in a separate and secure account managed by a top-notch administrator. It is also important to choose an administrator that has multiple banking partners to ensure that large accounts that may be in excess of FDIC limits can be set up in the most protective way.

 

 

4. Beneficiary Designation

 

An important provision of the administration agreement is the beneficiary designation language. Similar to the setting up of a trust or estate plan, it’s important for the member and all parties involved to know where the administrator should send the remaining funds in the account when the member passes away.

 

Typically, the administration agreement follows the guidance provided in the master settlement documents.  If there is no designation of a beneficiary in the settlement documents or if the account is established after settlement, the administrator will defer to the member for whom they wish to designate.

 

Tip: this provision, like many others, can be negotiated as part of the overall settlement discussion, separate from the administration service.  The beneficiary of the administered account can be the member or their estate; it can also be a corporate entity like the carrier/employer/payor involved in the claim (frequently referred to as a “reversionary” party), or a non-profit or charity, etc.  During settlement negotiations, the defense and plaintiff parties can negotiate the terms of this part of the agreement to determine who or what entities benefit from the remaining funds; sometimes the designation of the funds or a portion of them can be subject to certain terms and conditions, just as they can apply to other aspects of the settlement.

 

Upon death, the administrator will typically require a grace period to make sure all outstanding bills are gathered and payments are made; then, the administrator will close the account and cut the check to the designated party or parties.

 

 

5. Rights of the Injured Person 

 

Finally, it’s important the member fully understands their rights when their account is being established. They should have a number of common rights and protections and should also be aware of any restrictions. Here are a few common items to consider:

 

  • Review of performance: the member should be able to review the work of the administrator and report any inaccuracy to have it addressed
  • Protection: The member should be held harmless for any mistakes made by the administrator due to negligence
  • Savings: the member should receive the benefit of discounts secured on their behalf by the administrator. If the administrator benefits in any way from discounts negotiated, they should be transparent to the member.
  • Open Network: the member should be able to seek treatment with any provider or pharmacy. While a network may be in place to help the member save money, administrators should not restrict the member’s access to care with any provider, pharmacy or facility.
  • Termination: it should be clearly stated whether termination of the agreement or a withdrawal of the funds is allowed. This can be negotiated as part of the overall settlement. Typically, if the member is the sole beneficiary, they can choose to terminate the administration agreement and receive all their reporting and a check for their funds.  However, if there are other designated beneficiaries, language in the settlement agreement may restrict their ability in order to protect all beneficiaries’ interests.

 

 

Fitting It All Together

 

Along the way, if you or the injured person have any questions, the administrator will be a valued resource to clarify the terms of the agreement or explain how the service works.  Not all settlements are alike, so sometimes it’s beneficial to request edits and tweak terms of the agreement to your liking.

 

Once all parties are confident in the terms of the administration agreement, most often, the administration agreement will be added as an addendum to the settlement documents.  This way, it is part of the overall settlement package and can be approved at settlement; in workers compensation cases, the judge often wishes to sign off on all aspects of the settlement, including administration.

 

 

Author Porter Leslie, President Ametros. Porter directs the growth of Ametros and works with its many partners and clients. He built his career leading customer-focused businesses in the healthcare and financial services industries. Prior to Ametros, Porter worked in investment banking, private equity and corporate development.

Porter earned a B.A. in Economics from Columbia University, as well as an MBA from the Wharton School and an M.A. from the Lauder Institute at the University of Pennsylvania. Porter is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese and resides in Boston with his wife, Ruth, and son, Camilo.

Case Study: $270,917 in MSA Savings Through Physician Follow-up

Reduce your workers' comp case studyDeveloping a Medicare Set-Aside is not only a time-consuming and arduous process, but can also be unnecessarily expensive. There are many instances where tremendous sums of money are included in an MSA just because stakeholders were not diligent in analyzing what was included.

 

A case in point was a recent situation in which a medication the injured worker had taken only one time was set to be part of his lifetime medications in the MSA. Had this seemingly simple oversight not been flagged, it would have driven up the cost of the MSA by hundreds of thousands of dollars!

 

We hear all too often about injured workers who, unfortunately, fall through the cracks in the workers’ compensation system and are not appropriately cared for. While these represent only a small minority of cases, they generate headlines. Equally disturbing are stories of injured workers who’ve settled their cases and soon after find themselves out of money with no hope of paying for their future medical expenses, let alone moving on with their lives.

 

The goal of developing an MSA is to identify as accurately as possible the total cost that will be incurred during the injured worker’s life. The amount needs to include all expenses related only to the specific injury, as well as other treatments that may be needed later on.

 

Either party – injured worker or employer/payer – can wind up on the losing end of a settlement if it is not done correctly. This is why it is so important for all parties to carefully review the medications, procedures, and costs involved before signing off on an MSA.

 

 

Case Study (Provided by Tower MSA Partners): $270,917 in Savings from Physician Follow-up

 

An injured worker had been diagnosed with a variety of conditions stemming from a workplace injury, including depression, anxiety, complex regional pain syndrome and bilateral hand/arm pain with radiation to his right shoulder and neck. He was ready to settle his claim and leave the workers’ compensation system.

 

Among the six RXs included in the MSA projection was Nucynta 50mg. This opioid is meant to be a short-term treatment for moderate to severe pain. Not only is it highly addictive, but also extremely expensive. It comprised $245,721 of the MSA amount.

 

The worker had, understandably been treated by several physicians in the year before he agreed to settle. But the medical records were less than complete.

 

Total MSA Exposure — $326,925.

 

 

Solution:

 

With so many physicians involved, Tower’s physician follow-up team first obtained statements from each of the six providers involved in the worker’s treatment. They confirmed the last dates of services and whether medications had been continued or not. If they were, the name of the drug, dosage, and frequency for each was requested.

 

The physician who had prescribed Nucynta confirmed it was a one-time fill that was subsequently discontinued. The team identified several additional discrepancies in the statements from the physicians and had the physicians document the medical records with a revised medication list that reflected what the injured worker was actually taking and expected to need going forward.

 

 

Results:

 

Removing Nucynta from the medication list reduced the projected amount of the MSA by more than $245,000. An additional $81, 204 was also eliminated, based on the physicians’ statements

 

The MSA went from $326,925 to $56,008 — a savings of $270,917 and, with no negative impact on the injured worker!

 

 

Conclusion:

 

While the particular medication involved in this case was on the high-end of errors, the situation is all too familiar. Stakeholders often take information about current and future medications and treatments at face value, without delving into what is behind the numbers.

 

This case is typical in that a variety of physicians were involved, their records in many cases were incomplete, and there were medications included that had no bearing on the injured worker’s current, let alone future status.

 

Creating accurate MSAs takes time and skill. Those who undertake them need to ask questions and obtain all relevant information in order to come up with an amount that is fair to all sides.

 

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

You’re Fired! Using Employment Release and Resignations in Work Comp Cases

Employment Release and Resignations in Work Comp CasesRunning an effective workers’ compensation program revolves around managing risk and reducing it when necessary.  In some workers’ compensation cases, this includes the demand the employee voluntarily resigns their employment from the employer and agree to never work for them again, also known as an employment release and resignation.  Before making such demands, it is important to understand the numerous pitfalls associated with an employment release and resignation and how to use it in an effective manner.

 

 

Understanding an Employment Release

 

A voluntary resignation and release of any and all employment claims by the employee are outside the scope of the workers’ compensation insurance policy.  It is important for all defense interests to coordinate via their defense counsel.  The Release must be found in a document separate from the settlement of the workers’ compensation claim and the consideration (money paid to the employee) must be paid by the employer.

 

An effective Employment Release should be written with the interests of the employee and their employer in mind.  Given the numerous legal issues, attorneys representing the employer/insurer are often hesitant to draft such a document as it is outside the scope of their representation.  Retaining separate counsel who understands employment law issues may be something to consider.

 

It is also important that the employee understands what they are giving up under the terms of an Employment Release.  Points of contention include:

 

  • The inability of the employee to make a claim against the employer for future unemployment compensation benefits;

 

  • The inability of the employee to make an application for employment with the employer at any point in the future; and

 

  • The inability of the employee to make any employment claims against the employer such as age, gender, and race discrimination, along with claims for interference with and/or retaliation for making a workers’ compensation claim.

 

 

Essential Terms to Include in an Employment Release

 

Any Employment Release that is included in a workers’ compensation claim should be either drafted by and/or reviewed by an attorney specializing in employment law matters.  They should also know and understand all applicable state-specific and federal laws governing employment law matters.

 

Common terms found in such an Employment Release include the following:

 

  • Discrimination: Prominent federal laws in the area of employment prohibit employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.  These provisions are found under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  Other important federal laws include the Americans with Disabilities Act and equal pay laws.  State laws typically mirror federal standards, but can also exceed the minimum thresholds or include other classes (g. – sexual orientation, marital status, economic status/receipt of public assistance) of employees.

 

  • Retaliation: Most states have anti-retaliation provisions in their workers’ compensation laws that create a civil cause of action against employers who harass or intimate employees who file claims.  Case law in many states has extended legal protections to all employees, including those not legally authorized to work inside the United States.

 

  • Sexual Harassment and Emotional Distress: The #MeToo Movement has given rise to a renewed national consciousness regarding sexual harassment and assault in the workplace.  Claims can include the intentional or negligent infliction of emotional distress under tort law.

 

  • Contract Claims and Breach of Contract: Employees can also allege their employers violated the terms of a workplace contract.  This is often the case in dealing with employee’s subject to a collective bargaining agreement. While employees are generally considered “at will,” claims can be made for implied or express contracts.

 

  • Payment of Wages: Wage disputes are common for employee’s subject to overtime pay.  The non-payment of a bonus can also be an issue when an employee is subject to termination at the end of a quarter or year-end.

 

It is important to avoid using forms.  Failure to fully understand the law may prove catastrophic for all defense interests involved in a workers’ compensation claim.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Members of the claim management team need to seek opportunities to reduce risk and maximize the effectiveness of a workers’ compensation settlement.  One such option is to seek a global settlement where the employee agrees to voluntarily resign their employment from the employer.  It is important that the claim management team, employer and defense counsel discuss these issues and coordinate in an effective manner.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Paul H. Sighinolfi Joins Ametros as Senior Managing Director

paul_sighinolfiWilmington, Mass. (February 19, 2019) – Paul H. Sighinolfi has joined the Ametros Senior Leadership team as Senior Managing Director. Bringing with him a wealth of knowledge and experience, he will provide thought leadership and lead regulatory and policy initiatives, while providing meaningful strategic direction and insight.

 

“Paul and I have known each other for several years. He brings years of experience and a unique perspective,” says Marques Torbert, CEO of Ametros. “We are happy to have him on board to help Ametros continue to innovate and provide thought leadership in our industry.”

 

Ametros strives to enhance the lives of injured parties with innovative and affordable settlement solutions. Ametros focuses heavily on improving the health and well-being of injured workers ensuring that they live happier, healthier, and more productive lives post-settlement.

 

Sighinolfi is an attorney who brings over 30 years of experience in the workers’ compensation industry, most recently as executive director and chair of the Maine Workers’ Compensation Board.  Previously, he was a partner at Rudman-Winchell, LLC., directing the workers’ compensation practice group. He also coauthored Maine Employment Guide: Workers’ Compensation and has been a frequent speaker throughout the country on various workers’ compensation topics.

 

“Paul’s experience as the head of the workers’ compensation system in Maine, in addition to previously serving as both a plaintiff and defense attorney gives him a complete view of all sides of our workers’ compensation system and makes him a wonderful fit for our company,” Torbert says.

 

The International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC) elected Sighinolfi to its Board of Directors in 2014, and he served as its Board Vice President until earlier this year. He is a fellow of the American Bar Association, College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, and was formerly on the Executive Committee of the Southern Association of Workers’ Compensation Administrators.

 

Additionally, Sighinolfi has served as a director on the boards of several non-profit organizations, including Ronald McDonald House Charities of Maine, the Bangor YMCA, and the Girl Scouts of Pioneer Valley.  

 

Sighinolfi earned his master’s degree at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and his law degree at the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University of America, in Washington, D. C.

 

“I’ve worked in many aspects of workers’ compensation, and I truly believe what Ametros is doing is on the cutting edge of the industry,” says Sighinolfi. “I’m thrilled to be joining the Ametros team.”

 

 

ABOUT AMETROS

 

Ametros is the industry leader in post-settlement medical administration and a trusted partner for thousands of members receiving funds from workers’ compensation and liability settlements. Founded in 2010, Ametros provides post-settlement medical management services with significant medical and pharmacy discounts along with automated payment technology and Medicare reporting tools. Headquartered just north of Boston in Wilmington, Massachusetts, Ametros may be reached at 877.275.7415 or via www.ametroscards.com

 

CONTACTS

Ametros
Melissa Wright, 978-381-4329
mwright@ametroscards.com

What Is Likely The Problem With Your Work Comp Program


It was late one March evening and a taxicab going over 115 miles per hour smashes into the back of a police car. Instantly setting that car on fire, and the officer was trapped inside. Hello, my name is Michael Stack, I’m the CEO of AMAXX.

 

 

Burning Shield – Jason Schechterle

 

This past week I spent several days at the annual meeting of the settlement planning organization Ringler, he’s one of the partners on my website here at Reduce Your Worker’s Comp. Now it was a great couple of days spent networking and learning and sharing ideas, but one of the highlights of that conference or of that meeting was the keynote presentation given by Jason Schechterle, who was the officer who was inside of that car hit by the taxicab. Now Jason experienced severe burns on his face, his neck, his head, and over 40% of his body. He underwent over 50 surgeries to recover from that event. His message was powerful in his keynote presentation, and the book that he wrote called the Burning Shield. I recommend checking it out.

 

 

Accountability In This Life

 

Jason’s message had a lot to do with taking an honest look at our circumstances, and taking accountability for where we stood and what happened. There were so many powerful lessons and inspiring keynotes that he gave throughout the course of that presentation. The one that struck me the most went like this, he said good or bad, we have an accountability in this life. Why me is not a question is not a question we can ask. He said good or bad, we have an accountability in this life. Why me is not a question we can ask. Good or bad, we have an accountability in this life. Why me is not a question we can ask. That lesson and that sentiment is so applicable to so many areas of our life. Today we’re gonna talk about how that applies to your work comp program.

 

 

You Are Likely Looking At the Problem

 

What I see so often, particularly from employers, is that we want to blame everyone else. It’s the adjuster, they have too high of caseload. It’s that stinking doctor, he’ll never release my employee to work or that case manager’s not getting it together. Or my attorney, he’s a real pain in the butt or she’s a pain in the butt. Or that investigator, if that investigator would just have done their job we wouldn’t be in this mess that we’re in right now. It’s such a common sentiment that we feel in our work comp programs, and generally within our own lives. Per Jason’s lesson, we need to think about how that applies to our lives, and how that applies to our work comp programs as well. Because when you wake up in the morning and you’re looking in the mirror, you need to realize that you’re likely looking at the problem.

 

Again my name is Michael Stack, I’m the CEO of AMAXX. Remember your work today in worker’s compensation can have a dramatic impact on your company’s bottom line. But it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life. So be great.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Steps to Optimize Medicare Set Asides Before — and After — Settlement

Optimize MSAs Most workers’ compensation practitioners agree: Medicare Set-Asides can be a pain in the neck.  It takes time, resources and skill to create an MSA.  In addition, any snag could result in a loss of money — for the injured worker as well as other parties involved.

 

The myriad of moving parts and high chance for error, along with getting approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are the reasons a specialized industry has arisen around MSAs as well as other components to Medicare Secondary Payer compliance.  By understanding such things as when, how, and where to get an appropriate MSA and ensuring post-settlement assistance is available for reporting and follow-through, stakeholders can settle more claims and feel confident they are doing the right thing for injured workers and other parties involved.

 

 

MSA Realities

 

Here are a few sobering, post-settlement, realities from a professional administrator that demonstrate why MSAs cause angst to so many:

 

  1. There were 51% more phone calls from Medicare on MSA administration in 2018, compared to 2017
  2. Medicare inquired on virtually 100 percent of lump sum MSA exhaustions
  3. Medicare checked in on 1-out-of-every-3 structured settlement exhaustions
  4. CMS is adding more technology and getting smarter about compliance every year, especially with the post-settlement administration of the MSA.

 

In other words, don’t expect the government to ease up on ensuring Medicare’s status as the secondary payer in workers’ compensation cases anytime soon. Quite the opposite is happening as Medicare becomes more intent on not only ensuring the MSA was accurately put together but that the funds are spent appropriately.

 

 

MSA Q&As

 

Here are appropriate questions you need to ask and what to look for.

 

 

When is the right time to obtain an MSA?

 

When an injured worker has reached maximum medical improvement. Someone who is about to have or just had surgery, or is changing medical providers is not an appropriate candidate because his medical situation is likely to change. The injured worker should have his medications and treatment stabilized.

 

 

How can MSA amounts be deemed sufficient for the injured worker but not excessive?

 

You want to make sure the injured worker has the funds he needs to live out a fulfilling life, but don’t want to spend unnecessary dollars. This requires working with an MSA partner willing to take a deep look into the injured worker’s situation, now and in the future. There may be some projected treatments and/or medications that are inappropriate and unnecessary. Things to consider are:

 

  • Generic alternatives to medications
  • Potential overuse of opioids
  • Inconsistencies between medical records and prescription drug history
  • Whether authorized medications are still being prescribed or used
  • Medications that are unrelated to the occupational injury
  • Planned surgery that the injured worker does not want or need
  • Estimated costs for surgeries and other treatments that may be unrealistic
  • Frequency of physician visits
  • Rated age/life expectancy
  • Evidence-based medicine; to ensure it is being followed

 

 

What is clinical intervention and why is it important?

 

Identifying and clarifying these and other issues takes leg work. The MSA vendor must be willing and able to work with treating physicians and others to get the correct answers, as these are key to both saving money and protecting the injured worker.

 

This may include

 

  1. Physician follow-up
  2. Clinical oversight
  3. Peer-to-peer review, where another physician is brought in to work with the treating physician
  4. Addressing inappropriate care — another area where peer review is advantageous

 

There are situations, for example, when a particular medication is listed as being current but is no longer being prescribed. The solution is to have both the injured worker and the treating physician write statements specifying the date the medication ceased to be prescribed or used.

 

Another typical example is when a treating physician had discussed a specific treatment — such as a spinal cord stimulator, but later determined it was not necessary. The cost of a spinal cord stimulator can be in excess of $150,000. In that case, the MSA partner should seek a statement from the treating physician confirming the treatment is no longer necessary or reasonable.

 

 

What are indications of an effective MSA partner?

 

When considering organizations for partnerships, facts and figures tell the story. Some to look for include:

 

  • CMS MSA approval rate
  • Percentage of MSAs with prescription medications, especially opioids
  • Percentage of cases settled
  • Savings from clinical interventions
  • Rate of development letters
  • Average MSA approval amount

 

“These metrics determine the success or failure of an MSA program in limiting allocation amounts and facilitating settlement,” says Dan Anders, Chief Compliance Office of Tower MSA Partners.  “Your MSA partner should be using these key performance indicators to drive the outcomes you want to see.”

 

 

Post-Settlement MSA Support

 

Just because the MSA has been developed and approved by CMS and the claim settled, does not mean things cannot still go wrong. Complying with CMS requirements — including reporting duties — is crucial. That’s why it’s just as important to have a post-settlement strategy set up before the claim is settled. If the injured worker unintentionally fails to adhere to CMS guidelines and the money runs out —

 

  • They jeopardize their future Medicare benefits
  • They may be forced to reimburse all the money that was misspent, up to the full settlement amount
  • Their attorney(s) and/or others (including the adjuster/payer) may also be pulled back into the case, which can cause unnecessary burdens and work on everyone involved

 

Those in the best position to ensure things go smoothly after the settlement are professional administrators. These are neutral, third-party experts who handle all compliance and annual reporting for MSAs. Additionally, professional administrators establish a bank account for the injured worker’s future medical care and act as custodian — receiving the medical bills and paying them on behalf of the injured worker.

 

“There are a lot of things that happen in the settlement process that could confuse an injured worker,” said Marques Torbert, CEO of the leading professional administration company, Ametros. “Injured workers are worried about getting better. A professional administrator makes sure the injured worker has a support system and access to savings and support post-settlement while helping to keep them in compliance.”

 

A professional administrator should have extensive physician and pharmaceutical networks, which results in cost savings for the injured worker and extends the life of the MSA. Top-notch professional administrators demonstrate significant cost savings for injured workers while also protecting Medicare’s interests by maintaining the viability of the MSAs account over those workers’ lifetimes

 

Average Savings From Top Professional Administrator

 

  1. 63% on provider bills
  2. 28% on other medical expenses
  3. 50% with bill review adjustments

 

Many advocates for injured workers are finding that bringing in professional administrators during the settlement process can be extremely valuable. Because they are neutral third parties, they can serve as mediators for competing interests; such as carriers, and plaintiff and defense attorneys.

 

“Bridging the gap to settlement can sometimes be difficult,” says Torbert. “At the end of the day you have several stakeholders at the table, the only party that stays with the injured worker well after the settlement is the professional administrator. Being able to show the injured worker that they will be taken care of can help all parties come to a resolution.”

 

The benefits of professional administrators are such that CMS itself last year “highly recommended” injured workers consider using them for MSA administration.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Injured workers who have been in the workers’ compensation system for long periods are often hesitant to settle their claims due to fears of running out of money. An improperly developed or utilized MSA is one of the main reasons that fear can come to fruition. Having the right partners involved brings peace of mind to injured workers, as well as all parties involved in settlement.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

4 Reasons to Include Experts Early in Workers’ Comp Settlements

settlement consultantSettling workers’ compensation claims is — or should be — a major goal for payers and employers. Ideally, you want the injured worker to return to function and, if possible, work. At the very least, both you and the injured worker want out of the workers’ compensation system — the worker so he can move on with his life, and the payer/employer to get the claim off the books.

 

 

The Key to Successful Settlement is Starting Early

 

The key to successful settlement is starting early in the claim history.  However, all too often there are claims that sit on the books for years, adding up to devastation for the injured worker and significant costs for the payer/employer. Settling claims can be fraught with uncertainty and peril — unless you work with the right experts. While it’s impossible to find one person or even one company with expertise in all facets of settlements, there are experienced organizations that specialize in one area of settlements and have wide-reaching connections with authorities in other relevant areas.

 

 

What is a Settlement Consultant?

 

A settlement consultant is a settlement expert with knowledge and access to various settlement tools to address the most challenging workers’ compensation claim issues. These experts can be brought into the process early on, so the settlement is set up appropriately.

 

Rather than just running quotes, the settlement consultant should act as the general contractor in identifying, bringing and managing the best experts to the table to address the issues preventing a positive outcome for all parties in the case.

 

 

Whole Person Approach

 

Industry stakeholders are increasingly seeing better outcomes when they treat the injured worker holistically, rather than focusing only on the specific injury/illness. Ignoring issues such as comorbidities and psychosocial factors only prolong claims and end up costing more.

 

In the same way, injured workers who are settling their claims must be viewed in their entirety, since each person is unique. That means in addition to taking care of the person’s ongoing and future medical needs, other aspects of his wellbeing and life must be taken into account in order to have a successful settlement. A whole case approach is ultimately a win-win for everyone.

 

The amount of the settlement and how it will be distributed must be based on a variety of factors — not just the person’s injury. For example, some issues that may need attention are:

 

  • Retirement
  • Children with current or future educational needs
  • Legal concerns
  • Government benefits
  • Tax consequences
  • Insurance
  • Lien resolution

 

Uncovering the injured worker’s needs and desires should form the basis of the type of settlement and how the money will be distributed and overseen. The distribution of settlements can be done either by:

 

  • Lump sum, in which the entire amount is given to the injured worker; OR
  • Structured settlement, where the person gets money doled out in a variety of ways over a period of time.

 

The majority of injured workers, as well as others presented with the choice of collecting a significant amount of money, opt for the lump sum. Unfortunately, many of them end up running out of money way too early. In the case of an injured worker, that can present a slew of problems.

 

  1. Many injured workers who settle their claims have at least some of the money included in a Medicare Set-aside to ensure Medicare does not pay for medical care that should instead be paid through workers’ compensation. Determining whether and how an MSA should be created is highly complex and can be a nightmare for those without specific expertise in the area.

 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has specific reporting requirements for MSAs. Among them are:

 

  1. The money must be deposited into an interest-bearing account
  2. The funds must only be used for treatments related to the specific injury — not other medical issues
  3. The money can only be used for Medicare-covered expenses
  4. Payment must be made according to the appropriate fee schedule
  5. Each year, the injured worker must prepare and submit an annual accounting report to CMS
  6. A line item detail must be maintained for the duration of eligibility

 

Since failure to comply puts the injured worker at risk of being denied Medicare benefits, it’s crucial that an expert in managing MSA funds is involved.

 

  1. Other Benefits. Medicare is not the only government benefit program that could be impacted by a settlement. Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits can also be affected since settlements give the person additional assets. Injured workers who are receiving these benefits must be made aware of how a settlement could make them ineligible for these and other public benefits.

 

Special Needs Trusts were created by Congress for this very purpose. Some of the proceeds from the settlement can be placed in these vehicles to preserve and even extend the purchasing power of the settlement. Again, these are very complex and must be developed in conjunction with someone who has the expertise in state and federal statutes, public benefits and tax law.

 

  1. Durable Medical Equipment. In addition to the injured worker’s medical needs, he may need special equipment or even alterations to his home and vehicle. An expert on durable medical equipment (DME) should be involved in the settlement process to provide expertise on when, where and how much money will be needed.

 

  1. Family needs. In addition to the injured worker’s ongoing medical needs are those of his family. Children may eventually need money for a car and/or higher education. Parties to the settlement should understand this ahead of time to ensure it is structured in a way that will make these funds available when needed.

 

 

Engaging a Settlement Consultant

 

The best and more efficient time to engage a settlement consultant is before a claim has occurred.  The consultant should be a part of your team and ready to assist as needed.  When a claim comes across your desk and you say “ugh,” reach out to your settlement consultant and ask “what do you think?”

 

For legacy claims, find a block of with high reserves that seem to be going nowhere. Providing the name of the case, the adjuster, the claims liaison, attorneys, employer, TPA and a brief synopsis to the settlement consultant starts the ball rolling. With permission, the consultant can reach out to the various parties, gather information and report back as to which claims make sense for settling, as well as which cases do not and why.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Settling workers’ compensation claims should not be just about doling out a sum of money to an injured worker. An appropriate settlement starts with a settlement consultant early in the claim who builds a relationship with the injured worker and uncovers his needs, then brings in experts he knows who will be valuable contributors to the entire process. Working as a team with the injured worker creates a win-win for all parties.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

12 Questions and Metrics to Assess Work Comp MSA Cost Drivers

12 Questions and Metrics to Assess Work Comp MSA Cost Drivers A thoughtful and critical review of your Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) compliance program is a great exercise to perform annually.  Consider these questions and metrics:

 

 

Questions & Metrics to Assess Work Comp MSA Cost Drivers:

 

  • What percentage of your Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) submissions are accepted?
  • Can you identify the biggest cost drivers in your MSAs?
  • What percentage of your CMS approved MSAs include opioids?
  • What percentage of your approved MSAs include any pharmaceuticals?
  • What is the average cost of prescription drugs on MSAs?
  • Do you understand why CMS approves/denies MSA proposals?
  • Are you overfunding/underfunding MSAs? How do you know?
  • Do you know what documentation you need for approval of changes in medical treatment or pharmaceuticals?

 

If you were not able to confidently answer the questions above it might be time to make some changes to your MSP compliance program. Some claims and risk managers put together a program, let it run and hope for the best. Instead, using data analytics and continuously tracking outcomes and other performance indicators can significantly improve the process of preparing and submitting MSAs to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) — especially, where pharmaceuticals are concerned.

 

 

MSP Through the Years

 

It’s been approximately 15 years since the government ramped up its efforts to ensure Medicare doesn’t pay for medical services that should be funded by some other entity, including the workers’ compensation system.  At the time, organizations scrambled for ways to develop MSAs that would be approved by CMS.

 

The process for CMS approvals has evolved over the years. What was a fairly complicated system, to begin with, has turned into an extremely intricate series of steps that can befuddle even the most competent people in the industry – unless they have the benefit of highly advanced technological solutions combined with strong expertise.

 

For example, in addition to new regulations from CMS, state statutes and fee schedules are also constantly changing. Failing to keep tabs on them can make the process time consuming, costly and fraught with peril.

 

In the past 18 months, CMS has taken steps to intensify its efforts further. The agency has put millions of dollars into a new contractor and greatly updated its technology, making the process of identifying mistakes that much quicker and easier. It means anyone trying to stay in compliance with Medicare also needs to improve and upgrade their systems.

 

 

What the Metrics Can Tell Us

 

Most workers’ compensation payers would agree that pharmacy is the biggest cost driver for their MSAs. However, few know the answers to these key metrics:

 

  • What is your current pharmacy spend on MSAs?
  • What percentage of your CMS-approved MSAs include opioids?
  • What percentage of MSAs are approved with or without drugs?
  • What is the average cost of prescription drugs on your MSAs?

 

With medications comprising such a tremendous portion of MSA costs, it’s vital to have a clear understanding of the issue. This can only be accomplished by focusing on the metrics. By analyzing the data on opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in terms of your MSAs that are approved, you can then begin to fully manage these costs.

 

 

Optimizing MSA Outcomes

 

Whether working with an MSA vendor or doing Medicare compliance on your own, several strategies are a must for success.

 

  1. Identify metrics that drive the results you want to see, particularly where medications are concerned.
  2. Measure your performance and modify processes, workflow, and technology to improve it. For example, look at the percentage of your MSAs with ongoing medical to see how much you have allocated for opioids. If the answer is anything more than zero, go back to the drawing board.
  3. Examine current CMS performance and the most recent state statutes and fee schedules against CMS’s review methodology as defined in the most recent Workers’ Compensation MSA Reference Guide. If/when there are changes, update your system immediately. Once developed, this should be a simple verification, audit and sign-off process.
  4. Analyze every CMS response against your internal best practices in MSA allocation, with a focus on pharmaceuticals and opioids. You want to know how you are performing against CMS in such areas as pricing, frequency and life expectancy.
  5. Leverage Section 111 data to improve the CMS approval rate of MSAs.

 

To truly effect change in your Medicare compliance program requires examining certain metrics and taking steps to manage them best. For example:

 

  1. What is the number of Medicare conditional payment searches and investigations initiated and the success rates for disputes and appeals, including dollars saved?
  2. What type of clinical interventions have been initiated, what is their success rate and the average dollar amount saved because of them? This strategy can save many thousands of dollars per claim. Investigating each claim with an eye toward medical procedures anticipated and/or pharmaceuticals can yield surprising results. You may find, for example, a doctor is prescribing a medication the injured worker no longer takes or has never taken; so removing that drug from the future medical amount is an easy change.
  3. What is the percentage of submissions to which CMS has countered with a higher dollar amount? A lower dollar amount? If there is a high percentage of either, you need to understand why there is a trend and how to counteract it.

 

You want the injured worker to have adequate funds for his lifetime needs related to the injury, but you don’t want to pay unnecessarily high costs. Often the projected expenses are way too high, or the therapy is not within evidence-based medical guidelines.

 

The best MSA developers can fully assess exposure before the proposal is submitted. They can spot inappropriate or unnecessary treatment and pharmaceuticals AND take steps to curb them such as physician peer-to-peer discussions, for example.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Paying too much for anything does not make sense. But, that’s exactly what happens far too often because many workers’ compensation payers don’t take advantage of advanced technologies in developing MSAs. Using metrics and data analytics and working with an MSA expert can help ensure injured workers get what they need and deserve without payers going overboard.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

A Unique Perk For Workers with Limited or No Health Insurance

A Unique Perk For Workers with Limited or No Health InsuranceSome leading US companies offer a unique perk for injured workers who settle their claims with limited or no health insurance. They offer a service that gives these employees discounts on their medical care, support to navigate the health care system, and administration of their medical bills. It’s a way to give an injured worker an extension of their employee benefits while still maintaining control of their money after they’ve settled.

 

While this service is especially valuable for injured workers, it is not restricted only to them. Anyone can take advantage of these benefits to get a break on retail prices for prescriptions and other medical services along with support and advocacy. It’s a way to leverage the benefits of a post-settlement professional administrator without a formal agreement. Employers who can’t provide top-notch health insurance for their workers can direct them to these services as an alternative way to provide healthcare assistance.

 

 

The Benefits

 

Professional administrators offer significant price reductions for medications and medical treatments, as well as step-by-step guidance through the healthcare system — often via a 24-hour/7-day-a-week assistance to discuss healthcare issues. Injured workers with longstanding claims can find the comfort and peace of mind they need to finally settle their claims.

 

Injured parties with complex medical issues can sometimes be hesitant to end their relationship with the workers’ compensation system for fear of having to manage their money and health care needs on their own, as well as pay full retail price for prescriptions, doctor visits, and medical treatments. Working with a professional administrator after settlement can often be the answer for these employees.

 

Here’s how it works:

 

  • An injured worker or independent individual who signs up for the service is given a benefit card which can be used to pay for pharmaceuticals and other medical needs.
  • There is no obligation to use the card at any time, and the company cannot dictate when or how often the card is used, if ever.
  • Discounts off retail prices are available when the card is used.

 

The professional administrator does not have control over any specific amount of money. Instead, the user allows access to his bank account for only those services paid with the card from the professional administrator. The company simply processes payments made on the card through the person’s bank account. The better companies also provide the user with a report that tracks all payments made through the card in a given time period, which can be particularly helpful for those who trace Medicare payments.

 

 

Who Benefits Most

 

In addition to injured workers who have settled their claims, those who can gain the most through the services of a professional administrator include:

 

  • The uninsured. Those with no health insurance typically pay full price for their doctor visits, treatments, and medications; using a professional administrator results in significant savings to them. Additionally, they may want or need assistance locating providers and pharmacies as well as setting up appointments. Professional administrators provide these and other services.

 

  • Those with high deductibles. People who have health insurance with deductibles in the thousands often must pay full price for their medical services and/or Payments made through the card are not credited to the deductible. However, the discounts offered through a professional administrator can result in substantial savings.

 

 

  • Those looking for alternatives to high co-payments. Depending on the insurance plan, there may be high co-payments for visiting certain specialists or purchasing some medications. The professional administrator’s discounts may be lower than the out-of-pocket co-pay.

 

The services of a professional administrator are not appropriate for everyone, but for many, it is an alternative to paying high prices and trying to navigate the system alone.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Only a small percentage of injured workers who settle their cases are using professional administrators. But that is changing, especially since CMS’s recommendation last year that injured parties seek third-party assistance/professional administration after settling their claims.

 

Now, some of these companies have expanded their services to allow anyone to tap into some of the benefits of a professional administration without a formal commitment.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

6 Steps to Keep Liability Settlements Out of Medicare’s Crosshairs

Keep Liability Settlements Out of Medicare’s CrosshairsNo one likes to pay for items that are not their responsibility. This statement is true of the federal government in the workers’ compensation industry as the feds have exerted control over settlements involving injured workers who are or will soon be covered by Medicare.  An entire cottage industry has sprung up comprised of experts who develop Medicare Set-Asides (MSAs) and ensure Medicare’s interests are considered before a workers’ compensation settlement is finalized.

 

As the Medicare Set-Aside industry has grown and matured in workers’ compensation, a similar approach is now being considered with liability settlements. The law on the books for decades clearly says that Medicare is supposed to be a secondary payer in such settlements. Lately, there have been clear indications the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) plans to take action on this soon. How it will ultimately shake out is up for debate. In the meantime, payers should at least be aware of what is happening and take steps to prepare.

 

 

The Issue

 

“The extent to which settling parties must consider Medicare’s interests in medicals in a liability settlement continues to be unclear.” Thus begins a new white paper discussing the issue and what can be done. Written and published by Tower MSA Partners, Navigating Through the Fog: Medicare, Future Medicals & Liability Settlements reviews the workers’ compensation experience with CMS, outlines likely scenarios for liability settlements, and provides tips for payers.

 

Liability insurance coverage protects the policyholder or self-insured entity against claims based on negligence, inappropriate action, or inaction that results in bodily injury or property damage.

 

Examples include

 

  • Homeowners’ liability insurance
  • Automobile liability insurance
  • Product liability insurance
  • Malpractice liability insurance
  • Uninsured motorist liability insurance
  • Underinsured motorist liability insurance

 

Medicare beneficiaries must notify Medicare when a liability claim is made against a party with liability insurance and the liability carrier must report to Medicare when it settles a claim with a Medicare beneficiary. When there is a settlement, Medicare expects reimbursement for any payments it covered that should have been paid out of the settlement.

 

The settlement becomes more complicated when there are future medical costs for the specific injury. If Medicare is billed, it may seek reimbursement. In those situations, Medicare’s interests should be taken into account, and a liability MSA may be advisable.

 

 

Medicare Has Not Yet Established Framework for Liability MSAs

 

Unlike the process for workers’ compensation MSAs, Medicare has not established a framework for reviewing LMSAs or provided any guidance on the issue. Instead, any CMS reviews for proposed LMSAs that do occur are done on a case-by-case basis and only by some regional offices.

 

The good news is that, so far at least, there are no known incidents of CMS denying payment or seeking reimbursement for injury-related medical care after a liability settlement. Tower MSA Partners anticipates action from CMS within the next two years. When that happens, according to the white paper, CMS will need to address issues including:

 

  • Review thresholds
  • Allocation of the MSA based upon a compromise formula
  • Documentation required to submit to CMS with an LMSA proposal
  • Whether the LMSA review will occur pre- or post-settlement
  • Timeline for LMSA policy implementation
  • Multiple defendants and mass tort settlements
  • Pricing of medical in an LMSA (usual and customary vs. Medicare rates)

 

Other factors that come into play with liability settlements include policy limits, statutory tort caps, negligence rules, pre-existing conditions, case law and other issues that may result in a settlement for less than the full value of the claim.

 

 

What to Do

 

With things up in the air regarding liability settlements, one question is whether a claim for reimbursement could extend to the claimant and the primary plan, as well as the claimant’s attorney. Right now, it is uncertain.

 

Despite the vagueness of the issue, Towers suggests payers take the following actions to protect themselves and claimants.

 

  1. Identify whether the claimant is a Medicare beneficiary or has a reasonable expectation of Medicare eligibility within 30 months.
  2. If Medicare eligibility is or soon will come into play, evaluate the necessity of future injury-related medical care. Is future medical care claimed in the settlement demand or alleged in the pleadings?
  3. If there is a necessity of future injury-related medical care, will this burden likely be shifted to Medicare? For example, does the claimant have a source other than Medicare to pay future injury-related medical care; e., group health plan, which will likely cover future injury-related medical?
  4. If Medicare is the likely source of future injury-related medical care, consider whether there are sufficient settlement funds to allocate a portion to fully fund future medicals. If so, then consider an LMSA as part of the settlement. If there are insufficient funds to fully fund future medicals, then consider an apportionment of the future medical allocation in relation to other damages allocated in the settlement.
  5. Document the file and settlement/release in regard to steps taken to consider Medicare’s interest:

 

– If an LMSA or other type of allocation for future medical has been included in the settlement, ensure the plaintiff is aware of his or her responsibilities in utilizing those funds for future medical expenses.

– If the LMSA has been apportioned, document the reasons why such a reduction was taken.

– If no LMSA or allocation for future medical has been included in the settlement, then ensure the plaintiff is aware of the potential implications for future payments by Medicare for injury-related medical care.

– Document why no such allocation has been included in the settlement/release.

 

  1. Besides the future medical considerations, remember as well to investigate and resolve Medicare conditional payments, including payments made through Part C Medicare Advantage Plans.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Medicare may begin denying payment for claims if it determines that payment should have been made through a liability insurance policy or another primary payer. Such a change would likely delay liability settlements. Therefore, it is imperative to work with an experienced settlement planning professional, as failure to comply with MSP provisions can result in severe penalties.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

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