What Is Likely The Problem With Your Work Comp Program


It was late one March evening and a taxicab going over 115 miles per hour smashes into the back of a police car. Instantly setting that car on fire, and the officer was trapped inside. Hello, my name is Michael Stack, I’m the CEO of AMAXX.

 

 

Burning Shield – Jason Schechterle

 

This past week I spent several days at the annual meeting of the settlement planning organization Ringler, he’s one of the partners on my website here at Reduce Your Worker’s Comp. Now it was a great couple of days spent networking and learning and sharing ideas, but one of the highlights of that conference or of that meeting was the keynote presentation given by Jason Schechterle, who was the officer who was inside of that car hit by the taxicab. Now Jason experienced severe burns on his face, his neck, his head, and over 40% of his body. He underwent over 50 surgeries to recover from that event. His message was powerful in his keynote presentation, and the book that he wrote called the Burning Shield. I recommend checking it out.

 

 

Accountability In This Life

 

Jason’s message had a lot to do with taking an honest look at our circumstances, and taking accountability for where we stood and what happened. There were so many powerful lessons and inspiring keynotes that he gave throughout the course of that presentation. The one that struck me the most went like this, he said good or bad, we have an accountability in this life. Why me is not a question is not a question we can ask. He said good or bad, we have an accountability in this life. Why me is not a question we can ask. Good or bad, we have an accountability in this life. Why me is not a question we can ask. That lesson and that sentiment is so applicable to so many areas of our life. Today we’re gonna talk about how that applies to your work comp program.

 

 

You Are Likely Looking At the Problem

 

What I see so often, particularly from employers, is that we want to blame everyone else. It’s the adjuster, they have too high of caseload. It’s that stinking doctor, he’ll never release my employee to work or that case manager’s not getting it together. Or my attorney, he’s a real pain in the butt or she’s a pain in the butt. Or that investigator, if that investigator would just have done their job we wouldn’t be in this mess that we’re in right now. It’s such a common sentiment that we feel in our work comp programs, and generally within our own lives. Per Jason’s lesson, we need to think about how that applies to our lives, and how that applies to our work comp programs as well. Because when you wake up in the morning and you’re looking in the mirror, you need to realize that you’re likely looking at the problem.

 

Again my name is Michael Stack, I’m the CEO of AMAXX. Remember your work today in worker’s compensation can have a dramatic impact on your company’s bottom line. But it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life. So be great.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Steps to Optimize Medicare Set Asides Before — and After — Settlement

Optimize MSAs Most workers’ compensation practitioners agree: Medicare Set-Asides can be a pain in the neck.  It takes time, resources and skill to create an MSA.  In addition, any snag could result in a loss of money — for the injured worker as well as other parties involved.

 

The myriad of moving parts and high chance for error, along with getting approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are the reasons a specialized industry has arisen around MSAs as well as other components to Medicare Secondary Payer compliance.  By understanding such things as when, how, and where to get an appropriate MSA and ensuring post-settlement assistance is available for reporting and follow-through, stakeholders can settle more claims and feel confident they are doing the right thing for injured workers and other parties involved.

 

 

MSA Realities

 

Here are a few sobering, post-settlement, realities from a professional administrator that demonstrate why MSAs cause angst to so many:

 

  1. There were 51% more phone calls from Medicare on MSA administration in 2018, compared to 2017
  2. Medicare inquired on virtually 100 percent of lump sum MSA exhaustions
  3. Medicare checked in on 1-out-of-every-3 structured settlement exhaustions
  4. CMS is adding more technology and getting smarter about compliance every year, especially with the post-settlement administration of the MSA.

 

In other words, don’t expect the government to ease up on ensuring Medicare’s status as the secondary payer in workers’ compensation cases anytime soon. Quite the opposite is happening as Medicare becomes more intent on not only ensuring the MSA was accurately put together but that the funds are spent appropriately.

 

 

MSA Q&As

 

Here are appropriate questions you need to ask and what to look for.

 

 

When is the right time to obtain an MSA?

 

When an injured worker has reached maximum medical improvement. Someone who is about to have or just had surgery, or is changing medical providers is not an appropriate candidate because his medical situation is likely to change. The injured worker should have his medications and treatment stabilized.

 

 

How can MSA amounts be deemed sufficient for the injured worker but not excessive?

 

You want to make sure the injured worker has the funds he needs to live out a fulfilling life, but don’t want to spend unnecessary dollars. This requires working with an MSA partner willing to take a deep look into the injured worker’s situation, now and in the future. There may be some projected treatments and/or medications that are inappropriate and unnecessary. Things to consider are:

 

  • Generic alternatives to medications
  • Potential overuse of opioids
  • Inconsistencies between medical records and prescription drug history
  • Whether authorized medications are still being prescribed or used
  • Medications that are unrelated to the occupational injury
  • Planned surgery that the injured worker does not want or need
  • Estimated costs for surgeries and other treatments that may be unrealistic
  • Frequency of physician visits
  • Rated age/life expectancy
  • Evidence-based medicine; to ensure it is being followed

 

 

What is clinical intervention and why is it important?

 

Identifying and clarifying these and other issues takes leg work. The MSA vendor must be willing and able to work with treating physicians and others to get the correct answers, as these are key to both saving money and protecting the injured worker.

 

This may include

 

  1. Physician follow-up
  2. Clinical oversight
  3. Peer-to-peer review, where another physician is brought in to work with the treating physician
  4. Addressing inappropriate care — another area where peer review is advantageous

 

There are situations, for example, when a particular medication is listed as being current but is no longer being prescribed. The solution is to have both the injured worker and the treating physician write statements specifying the date the medication ceased to be prescribed or used.

 

Another typical example is when a treating physician had discussed a specific treatment — such as a spinal cord stimulator, but later determined it was not necessary. The cost of a spinal cord stimulator can be in excess of $150,000. In that case, the MSA partner should seek a statement from the treating physician confirming the treatment is no longer necessary or reasonable.

 

 

What are indications of an effective MSA partner?

 

When considering organizations for partnerships, facts and figures tell the story. Some to look for include:

 

  • CMS MSA approval rate
  • Percentage of MSAs with prescription medications, especially opioids
  • Percentage of cases settled
  • Savings from clinical interventions
  • Rate of development letters
  • Average MSA approval amount

 

“These metrics determine the success or failure of an MSA program in limiting allocation amounts and facilitating settlement,” says Dan Anders, Chief Compliance Office of Tower MSA Partners.  “Your MSA partner should be using these key performance indicators to drive the outcomes you want to see.”

 

 

Post-Settlement MSA Support

 

Just because the MSA has been developed and approved by CMS and the claim settled, does not mean things cannot still go wrong. Complying with CMS requirements — including reporting duties — is crucial. That’s why it’s just as important to have a post-settlement strategy set up before the claim is settled. If the injured worker unintentionally fails to adhere to CMS guidelines and the money runs out —

 

  • They jeopardize their future Medicare benefits
  • They may be forced to reimburse all the money that was misspent, up to the full settlement amount
  • Their attorney(s) and/or others (including the adjuster/payer) may also be pulled back into the case, which can cause unnecessary burdens and work on everyone involved

 

Those in the best position to ensure things go smoothly after the settlement are professional administrators. These are neutral, third-party experts who handle all compliance and annual reporting for MSAs. Additionally, professional administrators establish a bank account for the injured worker’s future medical care and act as custodian — receiving the medical bills and paying them on behalf of the injured worker.

 

“There are a lot of things that happen in the settlement process that could confuse an injured worker,” said Marques Torbert, CEO of the leading professional administration company, Ametros. “Injured workers are worried about getting better. A professional administrator makes sure the injured worker has a support system and access to savings and support post-settlement while helping to keep them in compliance.”

 

A professional administrator should have extensive physician and pharmaceutical networks, which results in cost savings for the injured worker and extends the life of the MSA. Top-notch professional administrators demonstrate significant cost savings for injured workers while also protecting Medicare’s interests by maintaining the viability of the MSAs account over those workers’ lifetimes

 

Average Savings From Top Professional Administrator

 

  1. 63% on provider bills
  2. 28% on other medical expenses
  3. 50% with bill review adjustments

 

Many advocates for injured workers are finding that bringing in professional administrators during the settlement process can be extremely valuable. Because they are neutral third parties, they can serve as mediators for competing interests; such as carriers, and plaintiff and defense attorneys.

 

“Bridging the gap to settlement can sometimes be difficult,” says Torbert. “At the end of the day you have several stakeholders at the table, the only party that stays with the injured worker well after the settlement is the professional administrator. Being able to show the injured worker that they will be taken care of can help all parties come to a resolution.”

 

The benefits of professional administrators are such that CMS itself last year “highly recommended” injured workers consider using them for MSA administration.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Injured workers who have been in the workers’ compensation system for long periods are often hesitant to settle their claims due to fears of running out of money. An improperly developed or utilized MSA is one of the main reasons that fear can come to fruition. Having the right partners involved brings peace of mind to injured workers, as well as all parties involved in settlement.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

4 Reasons to Include Experts Early in Workers’ Comp Settlements

settlement consultantSettling workers’ compensation claims is — or should be — a major goal for payers and employers. Ideally, you want the injured worker to return to function and, if possible, work. At the very least, both you and the injured worker want out of the workers’ compensation system — the worker so he can move on with his life, and the payer/employer to get the claim off the books.

 

 

The Key to Successful Settlement is Starting Early

 

The key to successful settlement is starting early in the claim history.  However, all too often there are claims that sit on the books for years, adding up to devastation for the injured worker and significant costs for the payer/employer. Settling claims can be fraught with uncertainty and peril — unless you work with the right experts. While it’s impossible to find one person or even one company with expertise in all facets of settlements, there are experienced organizations that specialize in one area of settlements and have wide-reaching connections with authorities in other relevant areas.

 

 

What is a Settlement Consultant?

 

A settlement consultant is a settlement expert with knowledge and access to various settlement tools to address the most challenging workers’ compensation claim issues. These experts can be brought into the process early on, so the settlement is set up appropriately.

 

Rather than just running quotes, the settlement consultant should act as the general contractor in identifying, bringing and managing the best experts to the table to address the issues preventing a positive outcome for all parties in the case.

 

 

Whole Person Approach

 

Industry stakeholders are increasingly seeing better outcomes when they treat the injured worker holistically, rather than focusing only on the specific injury/illness. Ignoring issues such as comorbidities and psychosocial factors only prolong claims and end up costing more.

 

In the same way, injured workers who are settling their claims must be viewed in their entirety, since each person is unique. That means in addition to taking care of the person’s ongoing and future medical needs, other aspects of his wellbeing and life must be taken into account in order to have a successful settlement. A whole case approach is ultimately a win-win for everyone.

 

The amount of the settlement and how it will be distributed must be based on a variety of factors — not just the person’s injury. For example, some issues that may need attention are:

 

  • Retirement
  • Children with current or future educational needs
  • Legal concerns
  • Government benefits
  • Tax consequences
  • Insurance
  • Lien resolution

 

Uncovering the injured worker’s needs and desires should form the basis of the type of settlement and how the money will be distributed and overseen. The distribution of settlements can be done either by:

 

  • Lump sum, in which the entire amount is given to the injured worker; OR
  • Structured settlement, where the person gets money doled out in a variety of ways over a period of time.

 

The majority of injured workers, as well as others presented with the choice of collecting a significant amount of money, opt for the lump sum. Unfortunately, many of them end up running out of money way too early. In the case of an injured worker, that can present a slew of problems.

 

  1. Many injured workers who settle their claims have at least some of the money included in a Medicare Set-aside to ensure Medicare does not pay for medical care that should instead be paid through workers’ compensation. Determining whether and how an MSA should be created is highly complex and can be a nightmare for those without specific expertise in the area.

 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has specific reporting requirements for MSAs. Among them are:

 

  1. The money must be deposited into an interest-bearing account
  2. The funds must only be used for treatments related to the specific injury — not other medical issues
  3. The money can only be used for Medicare-covered expenses
  4. Payment must be made according to the appropriate fee schedule
  5. Each year, the injured worker must prepare and submit an annual accounting report to CMS
  6. A line item detail must be maintained for the duration of eligibility

 

Since failure to comply puts the injured worker at risk of being denied Medicare benefits, it’s crucial that an expert in managing MSA funds is involved.

 

  1. Other Benefits. Medicare is not the only government benefit program that could be impacted by a settlement. Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits can also be affected since settlements give the person additional assets. Injured workers who are receiving these benefits must be made aware of how a settlement could make them ineligible for these and other public benefits.

 

Special Needs Trusts were created by Congress for this very purpose. Some of the proceeds from the settlement can be placed in these vehicles to preserve and even extend the purchasing power of the settlement. Again, these are very complex and must be developed in conjunction with someone who has the expertise in state and federal statutes, public benefits and tax law.

 

  1. Durable Medical Equipment. In addition to the injured worker’s medical needs, he may need special equipment or even alterations to his home and vehicle. An expert on durable medical equipment (DME) should be involved in the settlement process to provide expertise on when, where and how much money will be needed.

 

  1. Family needs. In addition to the injured worker’s ongoing medical needs are those of his family. Children may eventually need money for a car and/or higher education. Parties to the settlement should understand this ahead of time to ensure it is structured in a way that will make these funds available when needed.

 

 

Engaging a Settlement Consultant

 

The best and more efficient time to engage a settlement consultant is before a claim has occurred.  The consultant should be a part of your team and ready to assist as needed.  When a claim comes across your desk and you say “ugh,” reach out to your settlement consultant and ask “what do you think?”

 

For legacy claims, find a block of with high reserves that seem to be going nowhere. Providing the name of the case, the adjuster, the claims liaison, attorneys, employer, TPA and a brief synopsis to the settlement consultant starts the ball rolling. With permission, the consultant can reach out to the various parties, gather information and report back as to which claims make sense for settling, as well as which cases do not and why.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Settling workers’ compensation claims should not be just about doling out a sum of money to an injured worker. An appropriate settlement starts with a settlement consultant early in the claim who builds a relationship with the injured worker and uncovers his needs, then brings in experts he knows who will be valuable contributors to the entire process. Working as a team with the injured worker creates a win-win for all parties.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2019 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

12 Questions and Metrics to Assess Work Comp MSA Cost Drivers

12 Questions and Metrics to Assess Work Comp MSA Cost Drivers A thoughtful and critical review of your Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) compliance program is a great exercise to perform annually.  Consider these questions and metrics:

 

 

Questions & Metrics to Assess Work Comp MSA Cost Drivers:

 

  • What percentage of your Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) submissions are accepted?
  • Can you identify the biggest cost drivers in your MSAs?
  • What percentage of your CMS approved MSAs include opioids?
  • What percentage of your approved MSAs include any pharmaceuticals?
  • What is the average cost of prescription drugs on MSAs?
  • Do you understand why CMS approves/denies MSA proposals?
  • Are you overfunding/underfunding MSAs? How do you know?
  • Do you know what documentation you need for approval of changes in medical treatment or pharmaceuticals?

 

If you were not able to confidently answer the questions above it might be time to make some changes to your MSP compliance program. Some claims and risk managers put together a program, let it run and hope for the best. Instead, using data analytics and continuously tracking outcomes and other performance indicators can significantly improve the process of preparing and submitting MSAs to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) — especially, where pharmaceuticals are concerned.

 

 

MSP Through the Years

 

It’s been approximately 15 years since the government ramped up its efforts to ensure Medicare doesn’t pay for medical services that should be funded by some other entity, including the workers’ compensation system.  At the time, organizations scrambled for ways to develop MSAs that would be approved by CMS.

 

The process for CMS approvals has evolved over the years. What was a fairly complicated system, to begin with, has turned into an extremely intricate series of steps that can befuddle even the most competent people in the industry – unless they have the benefit of highly advanced technological solutions combined with strong expertise.

 

For example, in addition to new regulations from CMS, state statutes and fee schedules are also constantly changing. Failing to keep tabs on them can make the process time consuming, costly and fraught with peril.

 

In the past 18 months, CMS has taken steps to intensify its efforts further. The agency has put millions of dollars into a new contractor and greatly updated its technology, making the process of identifying mistakes that much quicker and easier. It means anyone trying to stay in compliance with Medicare also needs to improve and upgrade their systems.

 

 

What the Metrics Can Tell Us

 

Most workers’ compensation payers would agree that pharmacy is the biggest cost driver for their MSAs. However, few know the answers to these key metrics:

 

  • What is your current pharmacy spend on MSAs?
  • What percentage of your CMS-approved MSAs include opioids?
  • What percentage of MSAs are approved with or without drugs?
  • What is the average cost of prescription drugs on your MSAs?

 

With medications comprising such a tremendous portion of MSA costs, it’s vital to have a clear understanding of the issue. This can only be accomplished by focusing on the metrics. By analyzing the data on opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in terms of your MSAs that are approved, you can then begin to fully manage these costs.

 

 

Optimizing MSA Outcomes

 

Whether working with an MSA vendor or doing Medicare compliance on your own, several strategies are a must for success.

 

  1. Identify metrics that drive the results you want to see, particularly where medications are concerned.
  2. Measure your performance and modify processes, workflow, and technology to improve it. For example, look at the percentage of your MSAs with ongoing medical to see how much you have allocated for opioids. If the answer is anything more than zero, go back to the drawing board.
  3. Examine current CMS performance and the most recent state statutes and fee schedules against CMS’s review methodology as defined in the most recent Workers’ Compensation MSA Reference Guide. If/when there are changes, update your system immediately. Once developed, this should be a simple verification, audit and sign-off process.
  4. Analyze every CMS response against your internal best practices in MSA allocation, with a focus on pharmaceuticals and opioids. You want to know how you are performing against CMS in such areas as pricing, frequency and life expectancy.
  5. Leverage Section 111 data to improve the CMS approval rate of MSAs.

 

To truly effect change in your Medicare compliance program requires examining certain metrics and taking steps to manage them best. For example:

 

  1. What is the number of Medicare conditional payment searches and investigations initiated and the success rates for disputes and appeals, including dollars saved?
  2. What type of clinical interventions have been initiated, what is their success rate and the average dollar amount saved because of them? This strategy can save many thousands of dollars per claim. Investigating each claim with an eye toward medical procedures anticipated and/or pharmaceuticals can yield surprising results. You may find, for example, a doctor is prescribing a medication the injured worker no longer takes or has never taken; so removing that drug from the future medical amount is an easy change.
  3. What is the percentage of submissions to which CMS has countered with a higher dollar amount? A lower dollar amount? If there is a high percentage of either, you need to understand why there is a trend and how to counteract it.

 

You want the injured worker to have adequate funds for his lifetime needs related to the injury, but you don’t want to pay unnecessarily high costs. Often the projected expenses are way too high, or the therapy is not within evidence-based medical guidelines.

 

The best MSA developers can fully assess exposure before the proposal is submitted. They can spot inappropriate or unnecessary treatment and pharmaceuticals AND take steps to curb them such as physician peer-to-peer discussions, for example.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Paying too much for anything does not make sense. But, that’s exactly what happens far too often because many workers’ compensation payers don’t take advantage of advanced technologies in developing MSAs. Using metrics and data analytics and working with an MSA expert can help ensure injured workers get what they need and deserve without payers going overboard.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

A Unique Perk For Workers with Limited or No Health Insurance

A Unique Perk For Workers with Limited or No Health InsuranceSome leading US companies offer a unique perk for injured workers who settle their claims with limited or no health insurance. They offer a service that gives these employees discounts on their medical care, support to navigate the health care system, and administration of their medical bills. It’s a way to give an injured worker an extension of their employee benefits while still maintaining control of their money after they’ve settled.

 

While this service is especially valuable for injured workers, it is not restricted only to them. Anyone can take advantage of these benefits to get a break on retail prices for prescriptions and other medical services along with support and advocacy. It’s a way to leverage the benefits of a post-settlement professional administrator without a formal agreement. Employers who can’t provide top-notch health insurance for their workers can direct them to these services as an alternative way to provide healthcare assistance.

 

 

The Benefits

 

Professional administrators offer significant price reductions for medications and medical treatments, as well as step-by-step guidance through the healthcare system — often via a 24-hour/7-day-a-week assistance to discuss healthcare issues. Injured workers with longstanding claims can find the comfort and peace of mind they need to finally settle their claims.

 

Injured parties with complex medical issues can sometimes be hesitant to end their relationship with the workers’ compensation system for fear of having to manage their money and health care needs on their own, as well as pay full retail price for prescriptions, doctor visits, and medical treatments. Working with a professional administrator after settlement can often be the answer for these employees.

 

Here’s how it works:

 

  • An injured worker or independent individual who signs up for the service is given a benefit card which can be used to pay for pharmaceuticals and other medical needs.
  • There is no obligation to use the card at any time, and the company cannot dictate when or how often the card is used, if ever.
  • Discounts off retail prices are available when the card is used.

 

The professional administrator does not have control over any specific amount of money. Instead, the user allows access to his bank account for only those services paid with the card from the professional administrator. The company simply processes payments made on the card through the person’s bank account. The better companies also provide the user with a report that tracks all payments made through the card in a given time period, which can be particularly helpful for those who trace Medicare payments.

 

 

Who Benefits Most

 

In addition to injured workers who have settled their claims, those who can gain the most through the services of a professional administrator include:

 

  • The uninsured. Those with no health insurance typically pay full price for their doctor visits, treatments, and medications; using a professional administrator results in significant savings to them. Additionally, they may want or need assistance locating providers and pharmacies as well as setting up appointments. Professional administrators provide these and other services.

 

  • Those with high deductibles. People who have health insurance with deductibles in the thousands often must pay full price for their medical services and/or Payments made through the card are not credited to the deductible. However, the discounts offered through a professional administrator can result in substantial savings.

 

 

  • Those looking for alternatives to high co-payments. Depending on the insurance plan, there may be high co-payments for visiting certain specialists or purchasing some medications. The professional administrator’s discounts may be lower than the out-of-pocket co-pay.

 

The services of a professional administrator are not appropriate for everyone, but for many, it is an alternative to paying high prices and trying to navigate the system alone.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Only a small percentage of injured workers who settle their cases are using professional administrators. But that is changing, especially since CMS’s recommendation last year that injured parties seek third-party assistance/professional administration after settling their claims.

 

Now, some of these companies have expanded their services to allow anyone to tap into some of the benefits of a professional administration without a formal commitment.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

6 Steps to Keep Liability Settlements Out of Medicare’s Crosshairs

Keep Liability Settlements Out of Medicare’s CrosshairsNo one likes to pay for items that are not their responsibility. This statement is true of the federal government in the workers’ compensation industry as the feds have exerted control over settlements involving injured workers who are or will soon be covered by Medicare.  An entire cottage industry has sprung up comprised of experts who develop Medicare Set-Asides (MSAs) and ensure Medicare’s interests are considered before a workers’ compensation settlement is finalized.

 

As the Medicare Set-Aside industry has grown and matured in workers’ compensation, a similar approach is now being considered with liability settlements. The law on the books for decades clearly says that Medicare is supposed to be a secondary payer in such settlements. Lately, there have been clear indications the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) plans to take action on this soon. How it will ultimately shake out is up for debate. In the meantime, payers should at least be aware of what is happening and take steps to prepare.

 

 

The Issue

 

“The extent to which settling parties must consider Medicare’s interests in medicals in a liability settlement continues to be unclear.” Thus begins a new white paper discussing the issue and what can be done. Written and published by Tower MSA Partners, Navigating Through the Fog: Medicare, Future Medicals & Liability Settlements reviews the workers’ compensation experience with CMS, outlines likely scenarios for liability settlements, and provides tips for payers.

 

Liability insurance coverage protects the policyholder or self-insured entity against claims based on negligence, inappropriate action, or inaction that results in bodily injury or property damage.

 

Examples include

 

  • Homeowners’ liability insurance
  • Automobile liability insurance
  • Product liability insurance
  • Malpractice liability insurance
  • Uninsured motorist liability insurance
  • Underinsured motorist liability insurance

 

Medicare beneficiaries must notify Medicare when a liability claim is made against a party with liability insurance and the liability carrier must report to Medicare when it settles a claim with a Medicare beneficiary. When there is a settlement, Medicare expects reimbursement for any payments it covered that should have been paid out of the settlement.

 

The settlement becomes more complicated when there are future medical costs for the specific injury. If Medicare is billed, it may seek reimbursement. In those situations, Medicare’s interests should be taken into account, and a liability MSA may be advisable.

 

 

Medicare Has Not Yet Established Framework for Liability MSAs

 

Unlike the process for workers’ compensation MSAs, Medicare has not established a framework for reviewing LMSAs or provided any guidance on the issue. Instead, any CMS reviews for proposed LMSAs that do occur are done on a case-by-case basis and only by some regional offices.

 

The good news is that, so far at least, there are no known incidents of CMS denying payment or seeking reimbursement for injury-related medical care after a liability settlement. Tower MSA Partners anticipates action from CMS within the next two years. When that happens, according to the white paper, CMS will need to address issues including:

 

  • Review thresholds
  • Allocation of the MSA based upon a compromise formula
  • Documentation required to submit to CMS with an LMSA proposal
  • Whether the LMSA review will occur pre- or post-settlement
  • Timeline for LMSA policy implementation
  • Multiple defendants and mass tort settlements
  • Pricing of medical in an LMSA (usual and customary vs. Medicare rates)

 

Other factors that come into play with liability settlements include policy limits, statutory tort caps, negligence rules, pre-existing conditions, case law and other issues that may result in a settlement for less than the full value of the claim.

 

 

What to Do

 

With things up in the air regarding liability settlements, one question is whether a claim for reimbursement could extend to the claimant and the primary plan, as well as the claimant’s attorney. Right now, it is uncertain.

 

Despite the vagueness of the issue, Towers suggests payers take the following actions to protect themselves and claimants.

 

  1. Identify whether the claimant is a Medicare beneficiary or has a reasonable expectation of Medicare eligibility within 30 months.
  2. If Medicare eligibility is or soon will come into play, evaluate the necessity of future injury-related medical care. Is future medical care claimed in the settlement demand or alleged in the pleadings?
  3. If there is a necessity of future injury-related medical care, will this burden likely be shifted to Medicare? For example, does the claimant have a source other than Medicare to pay future injury-related medical care; e., group health plan, which will likely cover future injury-related medical?
  4. If Medicare is the likely source of future injury-related medical care, consider whether there are sufficient settlement funds to allocate a portion to fully fund future medicals. If so, then consider an LMSA as part of the settlement. If there are insufficient funds to fully fund future medicals, then consider an apportionment of the future medical allocation in relation to other damages allocated in the settlement.
  5. Document the file and settlement/release in regard to steps taken to consider Medicare’s interest:

 

– If an LMSA or other type of allocation for future medical has been included in the settlement, ensure the plaintiff is aware of his or her responsibilities in utilizing those funds for future medical expenses.

– If the LMSA has been apportioned, document the reasons why such a reduction was taken.

– If no LMSA or allocation for future medical has been included in the settlement, then ensure the plaintiff is aware of the potential implications for future payments by Medicare for injury-related medical care.

– Document why no such allocation has been included in the settlement/release.

 

  1. Besides the future medical considerations, remember as well to investigate and resolve Medicare conditional payments, including payments made through Part C Medicare Advantage Plans.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Medicare may begin denying payment for claims if it determines that payment should have been made through a liability insurance policy or another primary payer. Such a change would likely delay liability settlements. Therefore, it is imperative to work with an experienced settlement planning professional, as failure to comply with MSP provisions can result in severe penalties.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Overcome Financial Fears Which Prevent A Successful Workers’ Comp Settlement

Overcome Financial Fears Which Prevent A Successful Workers’ Comp SettlementMany injured workers who settle their workers’ compensation claims struggle with how to ensure they’ll have enough money throughout their lives. There are many issues to consider in addition to continuing medical care – paying monthly bills, funding a child’s education, and unexpected expenses that may arise. There may also be concerns about complying with various government programs, such as Medicare and future tax implications.

 

Partnering with an expert settlement consultant is a must for any injured worker thinking of settling his workers’ compensation claim. There are many issues to consider and personal decisions to be made. A competent, experienced professional who spends time getting to know the injured worker and his loved ones can provide invaluable insight and guidance in the process.

 

 

Decisions, Decisions

 

Many people expecting a large sum of money opt for a large cash windfall over a long-term plan.  Sadly, despite their best efforts to preserve it, many of these individuals find the money is soon depleted. Statistics show this happens all too often.

 

Injured workers who settle their workers’ compensation claims are no different. But those who have the benefit of working with an expert can realize the myriad options involved in a settlement regarding how, when and what amount of money they can collect to meet their specific needs.

 

As an example, we’ll take a hypothetical case.

 

John is 57 years old and has been receiving workers’ compensation benefits for 7 years after being severely injured in a work-related accident. John is tired and frustrated with the workers’ compensation system and would like more control over his medical decisions. However, he has significant worries about the settlement amount. He doesn’t know how much would be appropriate to cover his lifetime medical costs and is concerned that he will run out of money too soon. He also has several outstanding debts that must be repaid soon. And he has a family and is worried he won’t have money to address their needs, now and in the future.

 

Finally, there is the issue of Medicare. He’s been told his medical care would need to be funded through a special fund to ensure Medicare is not forced to pay for treatment that should be covered through workers’ compensation. He doesn’t quite understand that or what his obligations would be.

 

 

The Solution

 

John and injured workers like him could have much improved, empowered lives — if they had an experienced, capable settlement consultant available to help. Such an expert could spend time with John and his family and sort out their various needs:

 

  • Money to pay off immediate expenses
  • Medicare and its requirements
  • College education funding for his children
  • Wedding expenses for his eldest daughter and her boyfriend
  • Funds to eventually help care for his aging parents

 

What John and many others may not understand are the various legal changes over the years that have made a long-term settlement plan much more appealing. For example, the government allows structured settlement payments to be income tax-free if they are the result of a physical injury, sickness or wrongful death. Congress has established specialized annuity contracts to meet the special needs of injured people, and to address the concern that too many people spend their money quickly. The idea is to incentivize injured workers and their families to take their settlement money in a series of guaranteed future payments.

 

Contrary to what some may believe, there is also the option to take some of the money upfront, and/or as a future lump sum payment. There are no constraints on how the money is paid. For example, it can be

 

  • Monthly
  • Quarterly
  • Semi-annually
  • Annually
  • Any combination

 

The amount paid is also adjustable. There could be a set amount for a few years, then increasing payments to handle anticipated future needs. The money can also be paid out over the person’s lifetime, or set up to continue being paid to heirs upon the person’s death.

 

In the case of ‘John,’ the settlement could be set up to receive money upfront to pay off his debts, then a stream of steady payments and influxes of larger sums at various points in the future to take care of his family’s needs. A competent settlement consultant can also put John in touch with other professionals such as:

 

  • Lifetime medical care management.
  • Lien resolution
  • Financial planning.
  • Tax consequences.
  • Government benefit programs.
  • Legal issues.
  • Retirement planning.
  • Insurance concerns.

 

 

Summary

 

Life is complicated and planning for a lifetime of medical management and financial stewardship from a workers’ compensation settlement is overwhelming and difficult. Working with a settlement consultant who understands the fears, needs, and concerns of the injured worker can both save significant settlement costs and bring peace of mind that lasts a lifetime.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Essential Elements of Effective Work Comp Settlement Agreements

Essential Elements of Effective Work Comp Settlement AgreementsThe only good file is a closed file! That is the mantra of any seasoned workers’ compensation claims professional.  Getting to the state of happiness requires skill, some luck and a lot of exceptional legal drafting when memorializing any settlement agreement.  Failure to do this can result in delay and added costs to a workers’ compensation program.

 

 

Outlining the Nature of the Dispute

 

The requirements for workers’ compensation settlement agreements vary in each jurisdiction.  Never forget to understand the essential requirements and include them in your settlement agreement.  Failure to do so will only cause future problems.  A general survey of state workers’ compensation laws note the following basic requirements:

 

  • Materials Facts: Any settlement agreement should have a statement of admitted material facts.

 

  • Matters in Dispute: The disagreements between the parties should also be stated.  It is important to allow the compensation judge or commissioner reviewing the document to know what matters are to be decided by the settlement agreement.

 

  • Positions of All Interested Parties: The claims and contentions of each party must be stated in the settlement document.  These statements outline what is in

 

A settlement agreement should also specifically outline what is being settled and how the issues are resolved.  The main item in this area is a lump sum or annuity payment to an injured worker and various agreements regarding medical providers and other interested parties. A settlement consultant should be brought in to explain the options and benefits of receiving the money via periodic payments compared to a single lump sum.

 

If any issues remain in dispute, it is important to detail those matters. Statute or rule also govern payments under a settlement agreement.  Failure to make timely payments can result in an assessment of penalties.

 

 

Types of Settlement Agreements

 

The types of settlements available under a workers’ compensation system vary in each jurisdiction.  In some instances, the parties are not able to close out future medicals.  In other instances, this is the norm.

 

  • Full, Final and Complete – Including Future Medicals: Under this type of settlement, all workers’ compensation benefits are forever closed out.  If you want something closed out, be sure it is clearly stated in the settlement document.

 

  • Full, Final and Complete – Future Medicals Open: This is a settlement where all indemnity benefits (TTD, TPD, PPD, and PTD) are closed out. Medical benefits are typically only closed out through the date of settlement or some other specified period of time.  The employee remains eligible for future medical care and treatment provided it is reasonable, necessary and causally related to the work injury.

 

  • Partial or “To-date” Settlements: This is a type of settlement where only certain benefits are closed out, or all workers’ compensation claims are resolved through the date of settlement.  Again, it is important to specify with precision what benefits are being closed out and through what date of the closure.

 

A competent workers’ compensation attorney should be part of this conversation.

 

 

Never Forget the Basics!

 

Regardless of jurisdiction, there are several guiding principles to keep in mind:

 

  • A workers’ compensation settlement may never really be final. Most workers’ compensation acts allow for rescission of the settlement or for it to be vacated should it be determined there was a mutual mistake of fact, fraud or significant unanticipated change in the employee’s medical condition.

 

  • All settlements are presumed to be fair, reasonable and in conformity with the workers’ compensation act. Extra scrutiny can apply in instances where the employee is not represented by an attorney.

 

  • A workers’ compensation settlement must be memorialized in writing and approved by a compensation judge or industrial commission. Failing to receive this stamp of approval can render your settlement agreement meaningless.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Like any legal document, a settlement agreement needs to be carefully drafted and written with precision.  Failure to do so can cause unnecessary (and unanticipated) future expenses.

 

“Sloppy, imprecise drafting can lead to legal wrangling. A single word in reciting the terms of a settlement, for example, can bring about intense litigation over interpretation. In drafting settlement agreements, lawyers should, quoting novelist Vladimir Nabokov’s advice to writers, ‘have the precision of a poet,’ leaving out the poet’s creativity, originality or artistic flourishes. Had the lawyers here been more studious and careful in choosing a single word (‘plus’), this case undoubtedly would not have been necessary.”  Paluch v. UPS, 2014 Ill. App. LEXIS 283 (Ill. Ct. App. 1st 2014)

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Making the Most of Work Comp Mediation

Making the Most of Work Comp MediationUsing mediation as a tool to reduce workers’ compensation program costs is a growing trend across the country.  There are a number of reasons for its increased use.  This includes the fact it involves all parties, allows the employer and employee to have a voice in claim settlement and for creative remedies that would otherwise not be available in a judicial setting.

 

 

How Does Mediation Work?

 

There is no set formula for a successful mediation.  It will typically involve an agreed upon neutral third-party who evaluates the case and moves the adverse parties toward settlement.  More successful mediations are held in-person and can include a mix of joint sessions or when the parties are separated into different private rooms.  Whenever a mediation is conducted, it is important for all interested parties to be present and free from distractions.

 

 

Preparing for Successful Mediation

 

There are a number of steps that parties interested in settlement should take in order to prepare for mediation.  Important steps should include:

 

  • Accurately review the claim to determine exposures and properly set reserves. Obtaining proper settlement authority and discussing settlement options is a must for defense counsel;

 

  • Determine if the case is ready for mediation and whether settlement could include bigger issues such as the closure of all future medicals;

 

  • Identify all potential intervention interests and place them on notice, if necessary. Failure to include a necessary party may be fatal to an otherwise great settlement;

 

  • Have realistic settlement expectations – and also understand what the expectations of the other party might be.

 

 

Securing the expertise of a settlement consultant can be a valuable tool prior to mediation. Prior to settlement, they can work closely with the injured worker to gain deep insight into his needs and desires and help all parties attain a successful settlement.

 

It is also important to prepare a confidential case analysis letter for the mediator.  This is an opportunity to help the neutral third-party understand not only the strengths and weaknesses of your case, but how you view the claims of the employee.  This correspondence should also include expert medical and vocational reports.  By providing this information to the mediator in advance, you can spend less time providing background information while actually at the mediation and more time moving the case toward settlement.

 

Information provided to the mediator directly related to the mediation and settlement of a claim is generally considered confidential and not admissible in court at a later date.  Be sure to fully understand the confidentially rules applicable to your jurisdiction before submitting information.

 

 

Getting to Yes: Tips for Settlements

 

It is important to keep an open mind when preparing for a workers’ compensation mediation.  Failing to do so will only lead to further frustration and lack of settlement.  Here are some tips to reach a settlement at mediation:

 

  • Prepare a Strategy: This includes playing “devil’s advocate” and discussing the pros and cons of various defenses.  A complete case evaluation should also take place and have a firm understanding of what the opening offer should be, likely counter-offers and the bottom line.

 

  • Keep Interested Parties Posted: In many instances, cases fail to settle at mediation because the parties have not placed interested medical providers on notice of their potential intervention claims.

 

  • Come Prepared for Settlement: Cases often settle at mediation and then languish as defense counsel and the attorney for the injured party exchange multiple drafts of settlement agreements. Proactive stakeholders should bring a laptop computer and portable printer, if available.  This allows the attorneys to have a copy of the settlement documents in hand, ready to review and reach a true final settlement.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Stakeholders interested in reducing workers’ compensation costs should examine the use of mediation as an opportunity to make their programs effective and efficient.  This can include the use of mediation as a tool to streamline the settlement process.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Overcome Catastrophic Claim Settlement Resistance With Support

Overcome Catastrophic Claim Settlement Resistance With SupportAs much as some injured workers’ complain about workers’ compensation, the system has some perks like a nurse case manager and adjuster to help coordinate appointments, deal with the administrative burden, and check in to ensure everything is going smoothly on the claim. Giving up this support can be a paralyzing fear and prevent a claim settlement.  This challenge is particularly true in complex catastrophic cases.

 

The good news is professional administrators are becoming increasingly popular — even Medicare “highly recommends” using them. Some of these organizations are going the extra mile to provide true one-on-one help for injured workers with complicated needs.

 

 

Professional Administrators

 

Professional administrators handle many of the administrative tasks on behalf of the injured worker once they’ve settled their Workers’ Compensation claim.

 

Managing the settlement money, paying medical bills, and complying with government regulations such as Medicare reporting requirements can be a nightmare. The professional administrator acts as an advocate for the injured worker to ensure they successfully navigate the health care system post-settlement.

 

Additional tasks include:

 

  • Finding and setting appointments with appropriate physicians and specialists
  • Taking care of all durable medical equipment needs
  • Ensuring that, at the very least, any payments for medical care don’t exceed the state’s medical fee schedule
  • Deciding whether recommended medical procedures should be undertaken

 

The role of the professional is to guide the injured worker through this process, by

 

  1. Coordinating medical care
  2. Processing medical payments
  3. Applying discounts to medical office visits, medications, and procedures
  4. Performing annual prescription reviews to assess medications that are prescribed
  5. Complying with government requirements
  6. Answering any questions of the injured worker

 

 

Post Settlement Help for Catastrophic Cases

 

While the services of professional administration are a tremendous benefit and offer peace of mind for the majority of injured workers who settle their claims, some need additional help and support. For them, a new service is appropriate.

 

Some professional administrators have developed teams of nurse care partners that specifically focus on injured workers with particularly complex medical situations; those who are brain injured, wheelchair bound, suffering from limb loss and depression and have difficulty with activities of daily living. Despite the shortcomings of the workers’ comp system, many in this situation are hesitant to settle their workers’ compensation claim for fear of losing the system’s support.

 

This innovative solution of providing nurse care partners provides a holistic focus on the injured worker. These partners will engage in conversations with injured workers, providing guidance and support about their treatment plan, medications, upcoming surgeries and any other concerns they have. This discussion allows the injured worker to make informed decisions about their healthcare, empowering them to take control of their lives. Additional benefits they provide include:

 

  1. Ensure monthly supplies of medications are provided on time
  2. Discuss potential post-surgical complications and recovery
  3. Provide insights into the long-term effects of medications and treatments related to the injured worker’s condition
  4. Assist injured worker in understanding their health care options, empowering them to make their own healthcare decisions
  5. Coordinate treatments for any unexpected complications that may arise
  6. Finding solutions to durable medical equipment needs
  7. Identify and discuss potential savings opportunities with the injured worker so they can make their own informed decisions
  8. Provide one-on-one support

 

 

Case Study: Henry* (case study provided by Ametros)

 

Henry* had lost both legs after a severe motor vehicle injury over two decades ago. In addition to his medical issues, he also suffers from depression, anxiety, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

Roadblock to Settlement

 

  • The only thing stronger than Henry’s desire to settle his claim was his concern over losing the support of the nurse case manager with whom he had developed a close relationship throughout the years.
  • He learned of the post-settlement assistance he could receive through a professional administrator and was encouraged to settle, though not fully convinced.
  • He knew he required an extra level of support.

 

Catalyst to Settlement

 

  • What ultimately changed Henry’s mind was learning about Ametros’ Health Navigator service and how its post-settlement care could impact his life.

 

Post-Settlement Care

 

  • As promised, Ametros sent a nurse, Melody, to meet Henry and conduct a wellness assessment in-person to understand all of his wants and needs. She established a direct line with Henry, built a rapport and let him know she would be available to help him navigate the complex healthcare system.
  • Before Henry settled his claim, Melody gathered all the medical information needed to make sure the transition would be smooth.
  • Henry settled his claim last December and Melody continued to act as Henry’s dedicated Care Partner.
  • Since then, Melody has been working with Henry closely. Initially, Henry contacted Melody multiple times each day with questions and concerns she could help address. His contacts are less frequent now, but he has come to trust and rely on her to be his advocate.

 

*name changed for privacy

 

 

Conclusion

 

Knowing that someone will be available to help navigate the complicated healthcare system leads many injured workers with long-standing claims to agree to settle. Now there is an extra layer of advocacy to help the most seriously injured take charge of their lives.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: https://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

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