Discrimination Alive and Well in the Global Workforce

 
In the new Global Report on Equality at Work 2011, the International Labor Office (ILO) is stating that in spite of continuous positive advances inanti-discrimination legislation, the global economic and social crisis has led to a higher risk of discrimination against some groups like migrant labour.
 
Economically adverse times are a breeding ground for discrimination at work and in society more broadly. We see this with the rise of populist solutions,” said ILO Director-General Juan Somavia, adding, “this threatens painstaking achievements of several decades.” (WCxKit)
 
 
The report entitled Equality at Work: The Continuing Challenge, cites equality bodies which receive increased numbers of complaints, showing that workplace discrimination has become more varied, and discrimination on multiple grounds is becoming the rule rather than the exception.
 
 
It also warns against a tendency during economic downturns to give lower priority to anti-discrimination policies and workers’ rights in practice. “Austerity measures and cutbacks in the budget of labor administrations and inspection services, and in funds available to specialized bodies dealing with non-discrimination and equality, can seriously compromise the ability of existing institutions to prevent the economic crisis from generating more discrimination and more inequalities,” the report says.
 
 
According to the report, the lack of reliable data in this context makes it difficult to assess the exact impact of these measures. It therefore calls on governments to put into place human, technical, and financial resources to improve data collection on discrimination at the national level.
 
 
The report also notes that new forms of discrimination at work arise while the old challenges remain at best only partially answered.
 
 
Among the key findings of the report:
 
1.      Significant progress has been made in recent decades in advancing gender equality in the world of work. However, the gender pay gap still exists, with women’s wages being on average 70 to 90 percent of men’s. While flexible arrangements of working schedules are gradually being introduced as an element of more family-friendly policies, discrimination related to pregnancy and maternity is still common.
 
2.      Sexual harassment is a significant problem in workplaces. Young, financially dependent, single, or divorced women and migrants are most vulnerable, while men who experience harassment tend to be young, gay, or members of ethnic or racial minorities.
 
3.      Combating racism is as relevant today as it ever was. Barriers impeding equal access to the labour market still need to be dismantled, particularly for people of African and Asian descent, indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities, and above all women in these groups.
 
4.      Migrant workers face widespread discrimination in access to employment, and many encounter discrimination when employed, including access to social insurance programs.
 
5.      Rising numbers of women and men experience discrimination on religious grounds, while discrimination based on political opinion tends to take place in the public sector, where loyalty to the policies of authorities in power can be a factor in access to employment.
 
6.      Work-related discrimination continues to exist for many of the world’s 650 million persons with disabilities as their low employment rate reveals.
 
7.      Persons with HIV/AIDS can suffer discrimination through mandatory testing policies, or testing under conditions, which are not genuinely voluntary or confidential.
 
8.      In the European Union, 64 per cent of those surveyed expected that the economic crisis would lead to more age discrimination in the labour market.
 
9.      In a limited number of industrialized countries, discrimination based on lifestyle has emerged as a topical issue, especially in relation to smoking and obesity. (WCxKit)
 
 
The Global Report recommends four priority steps to combat discrimination including the promotion of the universal ratification and application of the two fundamental ILO Conventions on equality and non-discrimination; the development and sharing of knowledge on the elimination of discrimination in employment and occupation; development of the institutional capacity of ILO constituents to more effectively implement the fundamental right of non-discrimination at work; and strengthening of international partnerships with major actors on equality.
 
 
1. Equality at Work: The Continuing Challenge, Global Report under the follow-up to the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, International Labour Conference, 100th Session 2011, International Labour Office, Geneva.
 

Author Rebecca Shafer
, JD, President of Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and website publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Workplace Absence Costing British Economy Big Bucks

Great Britain's economy lost 190 million working days to absence in 2010, with each employee taking an average of 6.5 days off sick, according to the latest CBI/Pfizer Absence and Workplace Health Survey.
 
 
Despite the introduction of the new “fit note” in 2010, the rate of absence last year was marginally higher than in 2009, when employees averaged 6.4 sick days, the lowest rate since the survey began in 1987. The 190 million days cost employers £17bn, including over £2.7bn from 30.4 million days of non-genuine sickness absence – so-called “sickies”. This does not include the other indirect costs of absence, like lower customer service and lost productivity. (WCxKit)
 
 
This year’s survey is the first since the launch of the fit note – the new medical certificate focused on what people can do rather than what they can’t, designed to aid returns to work and reduce absence costs. Despite strong support for the initiative, employers have been disappointed by their experience so far: 66% of firms said that it had not yet helped their rehabilitation policy, and 71% were not confident that GPs were using the fit note differently from the old sick note.
 
 
Katja Hall, CBI Chief Policy Director, noted, “There’s been no let up in the cost of absence to the UK economy, which runs into billions of pounds a year. Although many organizations have been successful in bringing down levels of absence, the gap between the best and worst has widened.
 
 
The substantial costs of absence to the economy put a premium on managing longer-term absence well. The fit note is a great initiative, which could play an important role in helping people back to work and stopping them slide into long-term absence. But employers are far from convinced that the scheme is working properly and don’t think GPs are getting the necessary training.
 
 
The launch of the electronic fit note should be an ideal opportunity for the Department of Work and Pensions to extend the reach of its training program and address GPs’ engagement. There can be no room for complacency in addressing the so-called sick note culture.”
 
 
On the cost of “sickies”, Hall added, “Sadly, more days were lost to non-genuine absence than in 2009 and the cost of these bogus sick days is over £2.7bn a year. Sickies are unfair on colleagues and damage employers' competitiveness at a critical point in the recovery.”
 
 
Employees in the public sector took more sick days than those in the private sector, an average of 8.1 days a year compared with 5.9 days. This represents an improvement on last year’s average of 8.3 days and a marked improvement since 2007’s average of 9 days. Far more absence in the public sector is long-term than in the private sector, and reducing this will be key to reaching private sector levels. (WCxKit)
 
 
The CBI estimates that if the public sector could reach private sector absence levels, it would save the taxpayer around £5bn by 2015-16. The cost of absence is much higher in the public sector – a median of £1040 compared with £710 in the private sector, or a difference of 46%.
 
 
Author Robert Elliott, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. See www.LowerWC.com for more information. Contact:Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

 
Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2011 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Lost Time Claims and Disabling Injuries Decrease In Alberta

By focusing on partnerships and long-term perspective, WCB-Alberta successfully navigated its way through 2009’s challenging and uncertain economic climate.
According to WCB-Alberta, after years of growth, Alberta workers and employers were faced with declining employment and an unpredictable economy. Despite these challenges, WCB-Alberta maintained stable worker benefits and employer premiums.
In presenting WCB-Alberta’s 2009 results to stakeholders at its recent general meeting, Guy Kerr, WCB president and CEO, reiterated the organization’s commitment to balancing the needs of Alberta workers and employers. (WCxKitz)
“We have a responsibility to compensate and rehabilitate covered workers who are injured on the job,” Kerr told stakeholders. “In 2009, WCB and our partners faced immense challenges, but we were prepared with solutions and strategies to maintain stability for both worker benefits and employer premiums while keeping our focus on fairness.”
Alberta’s system shrunk in 2009 with a drop to 1.73 million covered workers (from 1.83) and to 137,000 registered employers (from 140,000). Despite these changes and economic challenges, 93.1% of injured workers successfully returned to work — the highest rate ever.
WCB-Alberta’s 2009 Annual Report provides detailed results. Here are some highlights:
1.       The time-lost claim rate decreased to 1.6 per 100 workers.
2.       The disabling-injury rate decreased to 2.8 per 100 workers.
3.       The system remained financially stable and funded at 128.4%.
Good performance really does matter. Strong operational results combined with solid partnerships allowed WCB-Alberta to withstand external risk. (WCxKitz)
“As a Board, we are satisfied that WCB-Alberta and its partners are moving in the right direction to benefit stakeholders in the long-term,” David Carpenter, chair of the Board of Directors, told stakeholders. “The year 2009  demonstrated that when you plan ahead and make decisions with foresight, you can land on your feet despite what the world throws your way.”

“Looking forward, we are cautiously optimistic of a slow recovery in the Alberta economy,” Kerr added. “We will focus on finding practical yet innovative solutions to working with our partners to return injured workers to work.”

Author Robert Elliott
, executive vice president, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact:  Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com or 860-553-6604.

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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers comp issues.
 
©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

The Role of Self Insurance In Failing Economic Times

With the extended downturn in the economy, most workers’ compensation insurance companies find themselves with a combined loss ratio in excess of 100, which means they are losing money. When insurance companies start losing money, they start raising their premium rates. In response to rising insurance cost, many employers are considering self-insurance for their workers’ comp coverage.

 

The financial considerations for self-insurance include lower insurance cost, lower claim adjusting cost, better claim management, and lower state assessments. Other considerations include better integration of safety programs, better employee relations, and better management control.

 

Lower Insurance Cost

The lower cost of insurance is the initial reason most employers consider self-insuring. When an employer purchases insurance from an insurance company, the amount paid for the insurance premium includes:

  1.  The cost of claims.
  2.  The cost of administering those claims.
  3.  The operating expenses of the insurance company.
  4.  The insurance company’s profit.

 

By self-insuring employers eliminate the insurance company’s profit and the insurance company operating expenses (but assumes additional operating expenses of their own).

 

The employer is able to self-insure because the amount of workers’ comp losses are predictable based on experience. By knowing the amount of predictable losses, the employer self-insures for those amounts and purchases an excess insurance policy only for the losses deviating above the norm. Thus, the self-insurer purchases less insurance than would be purchased through a full-coverage workers’ comp insurance policy.

 

Lower Claim Adjusting Cost

While the Fortune 500 companies operate their self-insurance programs in many states, most self-insured operate in one state or a few states. Smaller operations allow them to use the services of the smaller third party administrators (TPA) able to provide excellent claim services at prices below what national and international TPAs must charge. The smaller local or regional claim administrators are more flexible in crafting and pricing the claims administration program to the needs of the self-insured employer.

 

Better Claim Management

When the insurance company adjuster is handling an employer’s workers’ comp claims, the adjuster tend to want to do things his/her own way. While an employer may make recommendations and suggestions to the adjuster, in the end the adjuster follows the instructions of the claim office supervisor, not the employer’s wishes. When the TPA’s adjuster is handling the workers’ comp claim, the self-insurer/employer the boss. The recommendations, suggestions, and directions provided by the employer will be closely followed by the TPA adjuster.

 

Assessments and Taxes

The cost of state assessments and taxes are included in the insurance policy from the workers’ comp insurer. The insurance carrier pays required assessments not levied on self-insurers. These include: the state assigned risk pool, the second injury fund, and insurance guarantee fund. When these assessments are levied on the self-insured they are lower because the insurance company assessment is based on premiums while the self-insured pays the assessment base on claim payments.

 

However, assessments do not always go in the favor of the self-insured company. Some states require self-insured companies to pay into a state self-insurance insolvency fund to cover claims from self-insurers who are insolvent.

 

Safety Programs

Companies switching to self-insurance almost always improve their safety programs to reduce or eliminate as many workers’ comp claims as possible. The employer who properly manages the loss prevention program will find the cost savings from workers’ comp self-insurance to be substantial.

 

Integration between the self-insurance program and the loss prevention program is much more complete within the employers who self-insure. When the insurance company is paying the claims, the motivation to prevent injuries is there but is not felt strongly. There is a greater motivation to get the most out of the loss prevention program when your company is paying the claims.

 

Employee Relations

A side benefit to the self-insuring employer is the ability to build better employee relations when an employee is injured. Employees often find comfort in the fact that their employer is in contact with them and it will be their employer making the decisions on their workers’ comp claim rather than an adjuster of an insurance company.

 

Management Control

Self-insurance often blends into the management philosophy of many employers who feel more comfortable being in control of the cost of the corporation. The self-insurance program allows the employer to participate actively in the claim management process and the associated cost of the claims. (workersxzcompxzkit)

 

Summary

Self-insurance allows the employer to reduce the cost of the workers’ comp insurance program. The self-insurer benefits from lower insurance premium/loss cost, lower claim handling cost, has better claims management, and lower assessment and taxes. The self-insurer also benefits from a more integrated safety program, better employee relations, and stronger management control. For more information on self-insurance programs, please contact us.


Author Rebecca Shafer,
 Attorney/Consultant, President, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers’ Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, manufacturing, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact:  RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com  or 860-553-6604.

FREE WC IQ Test: http://www.workerscompkit.com/intro/
WC Books: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/workers-comp-books-manuals.php
WC Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/calculator.php
TD Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers’ comp issues.


©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

What is the Impact of the Recession on Workers Compensation

The current recession is the second longest in our country's history. Per the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the recession started in December 2007. In April 2010 the NBER let an internal split become public, some of the economists wanted to call the recession over but others did not, they wanted more data. For everyone related to the workers’ comp field, the recession is still here.
 
The Insurance Journal reports the combined loss ratio for workers' compensation insurers for 2008 was 101. [That means for every $100 the insurance companies took in, they paid out $101].   In 2009 the combined loss ratio for workers’ comp insurers jumped nine points to 110. It is hard to stay in business when you spend $110 for every $100 you earn.
 
According to the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI), 2009 was really not that bad. The combined loss ratio would have been 107 except for one large carrier adding $1 billion to its excess workers’ comp reserves. Still, for all the other workers’ comp carriers, spending on average $107 for every $100 taken in is not a good thing.
 
The NCCI also reported net written workers’ comp insurance premiums dropped by 23% from 2007 to 2009. The primary cause of the downturn in premiums was the downturn in the economy. Among the companies hit the hardest by the recession were the employers in the construction and manufacturing fields. Both of these fields have higher than average workers’ comp premiums. 
 
As the workers’ comp premium calculation is based on payroll, a great way to reduce premiums is to lay off workers. [Of course if you take that approach too far, you go out of business!]. The impact of employers laying off workers was less premiums being paid to the workers’ comp insurers, At the same time the premium collection was being reduced, the existing workers’ comp claims being paid. Hopefully, the workers’ comp insurers have adequate reserves set up on each claim, but if one company is adding $1 billion to reserves…it makes you wonder.
 
Workers’ comp insurers with loss ratios in excess of 100 know how to correct the loss ratio — they raise the workers’ comp premiums they charge to employers. However, they have to remain competitive in order to keep existing business and hopefully obtain new business. 
 
The employers on the other hand should see some positive impacts on workers’ comp besides lower premiums due to fewer employees. The employees who are still employed tend to be the more experienced employees who have fewer accidents and injuries then less experienced employees. This results in the experience modification factor improving over time, resulting in a lower workers’ comp premium in the future.
 
The biggest impact of the recession on workers’ comp may be the psychological impact it has on employees. There are well-documented spikes in the number of workers’ comp claims for employers who close a factory or make other wholesale personnel reductions. Unscrupulous employees, believing they are about to be terminated, prefer the two-thirds of their average weekly wage from workers’ comp over the one-third of their average weekly wage from unemployment insurance (both workers’ comp indemnity benefits and unemployment insurance benefits vary by state).
 
Old injuries not a bother to  the employee for years suddenly take a severe turn for the worse the week before the lay-off.   Or, the employee who rarely works alone was working alone and strained his back the day before the lay-off.   Or, the employee reports she was hurt months ago, and tried to tough it out, but can no longer stand the pain, and needs to go to the doctor now. Lay-offs are a challenge for the workers’ comp claims office as the claims come in a bunch and all the claims need to be investigated at the same time.
 
The flip side to workers’ comp fraud is the recession also spawns a drop in workers’ comp claims. There are the employees who have a legitimate workers’ comp injury, but in their effort to 'stay in good with the boss,' don't report their claim for fear it will move them closer to the top of the layoff list.
 
Another psychological impact is on the employees with an obvious injury and must report their claims. They do so reluctantly. These employees, who might have taken a few days off when they got hurt, decide they do not want to do anything to jeopardize their job. They chose to be at work when they could legitimately stay home. What would have been a workers’ comp indemnity claim becomes a workers’ comp medical only claim.  
 
Of course there are also the employees who were truly injured and were out on disability benefits before a factory closing or layoff was announced. The psychological impact on them is a reluctancy to recover from their injury, as they know once they return to work, they will be terminated for lack of work. They are aware of the recession and are very concerned they will not be able to find another job.
 
The psychological impact also works the opposite way for the employee out on disability benefits. If they are not concerned about being terminated as soon as they return to work, they may try to convince their doctor they are ready and able to return to work. They fear if they stay out of work too long, it could cost them their job.   (workersxzcompxzkit)
 
Hopefully when the National Bureau of Economic Research gives their next assessment all the economists will be in agreement that the recession is over. Even if the recession is over, it will take a while for the impact of the recession on workers’ comp to dissipate.
  \Author Robert Elliott, J.D., Consultant/President, Amaxx Risks Solutions, Inc. has worked successfully for 20 years with many industries to reduce Workers’ Compensation costs, including airlines, healthcare, manufacturing, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality and manufacturing. Contact her:  RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com   or 860-553-6604.

FREE WC IQ Test:
http://www.workerscompkit.com/intro/
WC Books:
http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/workers-comp-books-manuals.php
WC Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/calculator.php
TD Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workers' comp issues.

©2010 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

How Economic Conditions Effect Workers Compensation Insurance

Claims are  going up. Not just workers’ comp claims, but all claims, including valid claims and invalid or fraudulent claims.

 

“Suspected fraudulent  claims related to workers’ compensation insurance were up 7%.”(1)  Some workers are filing claims after or pending employer layoffs they did not filed at the time of the injury.  These are often valid claims but were not filed perhaps because the worker was worried about the effect it would have on the employer, or chose to continue working rather than recuperate while receiving workers’ comp benefits.  On the other hand, once a worker is laid off, workers’ comp benefits are better than unemployment benefits or no income at all.  Many of these claims may be valid claims but may not have been filed under different economic conditions.

 

Adjusters have  a higher number of cases because insurance companies have downsized. Not only do adjusters have a heavier case-load but 40% of their time is spent on administrative duties, required by workers’ comp regulations, unrelated to the business of helping move cases towards closure.

 

In a recent interview,  John A. Mastropietro said “Insurance companies have downsized in recent years enormously, thereby leaving fewer claims adjusters, who are now handling a greater volume of cases. So there’s a tendency to not move on the part of those making decisions.”(2)

 

Cases are  taking longer because the insurers are trying to cut costs wherever possible, and are taking a harder look at their workers’ comp claims. This also slows the process, because cases usually moving right along are being fought on both sides.  More claimants and a more rigorous review process instituted by insurers, means more work per case with fewer adjusters to do the work.

 

Lastly,  the economy is causing the extension of cases due to the perception that no jobs are available.  Often labor market surveys are conducted showing there are no jobs available for the injured worker or claimant.  So, an expensive and previously useful tool available to the case managers and claims adjusters backfires. It is true jobs are more difficult to come by.  Why?

 

Companies are  cutting their human resource departments and their advertising budgets, including “open position” advertising.  Obviously, the cost of the ads is removed from the budget.

 

Another reason human resource departments are not advertising is due to the overwhelming size of the applicant pool.  Any job posted online from executive to laborer is bound to receive hundreds if not thousands of applicants.  This creates a situation very similar to the adjuster’s; more work is created while the staff has been downsized – and a situation referred to as “Paralysis through Analysis” results. (workersxzcompxzkit)

 

Too much paperwork  and forms for each applicant results in continuous delays in filling the position.  Therefore, many human resource managers are looking for alternative ways to locate the proper fit for their open positions.  Personal relationships and peer or other “networks” are often the key to landing an appropriate position in any field. 1.   NICB: Data Links Fraudulent Claims to Poor Economy   2.   Poor economy doubles workers’ comp claims The Future of Workers’ Comp Claim Adjudication

 

Author:  Katrina Paglierani of National Job Finders  finds jobs for injured employees,  performing job searches for injured workers’ with permanent restrictions to locate REAL jobs. National Job Finders sets up the interviews, notifies all parties, and follows up with their human resource contacts at the prospective employers.  Contact atKatrina@NationalJobFinders.com or 1-800-225-4070. “FRAUD PREVENTION” PODCAST click here: http://www.workerscompkit.com/gallagher/mp3 By: Private investigator with 25 years experience.

WC Books: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/workers-comp-books-manuals.php TD Calculator: www.ReduceYourWorkersComp.com/transitional-duty-cost-calculator.php WC Calculator: http://www.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/calculator.php

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker about workers’ comp issues. ©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

How is the Economy Effecting Workers Comp Claims Handling

Current economic  conditions are having an effect on the entire insurance industry. Claims are going up. Not just workers’ comp claims, but all claims, including both valid and invalid or fraudulent claims. Suspected fraudulent claims related to workers’ compensation insurance were up 71%. Some employees are filing claims after or pending employer layoffs not filed at the time of the injury.

 

These are often  valid claims but were not filed perhaps because the employee was worried about the effect it would have on their employer, or they would rather be working than recuperating while receiving workers’ comp benefits.  On the other hand, once an employee is laid off, workers’ comp benefits are better than unemployment benefits or no income at all.

 

Adjusters have  a higher number of cases because of downsizing by insurance companies. Not only do adjusters have heavier caseloads, but 40% of their time is spent on administrative duties unrelated to the business of helping move cases toward closure; admin duties required by workers’ comp regulations.

 

In a recent interview,  John A. Mastropietro, Chairman State of Connecticut Workers’ Compensation Commission said, “Insurance companies have downsized in recent years enormously, thereby leaving fewer claims adjusters, who are now handling a greater volume of cases. So there’s a tendency to not move on the part of those making decisions.”

 

Cases are taking  longer because the insurers are trying to cut costs wherever possible, and are therefore taking a harder look at their workers’ comp claims. This also slows down the process, because cases that would just move along are being fought on both sides.  More claimants and a more rigorous review process instituted by insurers means more work per case with fewer adjusters to do the work.

 

Lastly, the economy  is causing the extension of cases due to the perception that no jobs are available.  Often labor market surveys are conducted showing there are no jobs available for the injured worker or claimant.  So, an expensive and previously useful tool available to the case managers and claims adjusters backfires.

 

It is true   jobs are more difficult to come by.  Companies are cutting their human resource departments and their advertising budgets, including “open position” advertising.

 

Another reason human resource departments are not advertising is due to the overwhelming size of the applicant pool.  Any job posted online from executive to laborer is bound to receive hundreds if not thousands of applicants.  This creates a situation very similar to the adjuster’s —  more work for less staff  — or “Paralysis through Analysis.”  (workersxzcompxzkit)

 

Too much paperwork  and forms for each applicant results in a continuous delay in filling the position. Therefore, many human resource managers are looking for alternative ways to locate the proper fit for their open positions.  Personal relationships and peer or other ‘networks’ are often the key to landing an appropriate position in any field.

Information  
provided by Katrina Paglierani of National Job Finders.  www.nationaljobfinders.com/welcome

 

Author:  Rebecca Shafer, J.D.  consults for mid-market and national accounts focusing on project management, risk management assessments, data review, benchmarking, and development of Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Programs. Projects focus on development of training and education programs, document design, evaluation and integration of insurance claims administration and TPA services. Contact her at:   RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

We are accepting articles* on WC cost containment. Contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

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Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker or agent about workman’s comp issues.


©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

 

How Can Employers Close Claims When The Labor Market Survey Says There Are No Jobs

Company-Paid Labor Market Survey Says There Are No Jobs WHAT NOW? Claims Adjusters,  especially in Illinois, Michigan, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania are  hearing nothing but bad news about potential open positions for their claimants or injured workers on wage loss benefits.  Wage loss benefits will continue until the injured worker finds employment, so many employers hire job placement firms to assist in this task. A Labor market survey saying there are no jobs is not helping those in the risk management field. Here's What You Can Do There are positions  available but you must get in front of people who are "in the know" and can connect you to those positions.  Whether you are trying to find open positions for an injured worker with permanent restrictions, your son in-law, neighbor or friend, these tips will apply. 1.  ALWAYS   add keywords or tag lists at the end of your resume.  Recruiters and HR professionals often search on keywords or phrases when searching resume databases.  You want to make sure you are popping up in front of anyone who is looking for someone with your skill set.   For example,  if you are a CNA, you probably state that throughout your resume in the same format.  But, you may want to include these phrases in your keyword, tag list: certified nurses assistant, C.N.A., certified nurse, CNA, nursing assistant, etc. Different people  search in different ways, so you may want to add a list of industries where you have experience:  transportation, logistics, etc.  Because the market is inundated with people looking for work, the HR (Human Resource) professionals are able to look not only for someone with the skill set they require, but also they look for that skill set within the specific industry. There is a tendency  for HR to search the resume database for appropriate matches BEFORE they ever post the job. This is the quickest and most efficient way for them to find candidates.  So, if you are not getting in front of those searching a resume database, you will never even know about those open positions. 2.  Don't forget to refresh  your resume where it is posted for search.  Go in, change something (anything) in your resume and re-post. This could be as simple as changing the words it is to  it's.  Another tip, if you hit control F, you can search for that word or phrase and change it throughout your resume quickly and easily. 3.  Get good  at doing searches.  You will find you need to search for the open positions in your field using those same variations of open positions I just mentioned.  Do some searches, use quotes for exact phrases, use various keywords to express the same thing, i.e., CNA , C.N.A. Also, look for jobs at specific companies where you are interested in working. 4.  The competition  can be a great source for finding work.  Often, HR professionals will do a resume database search for their competition's former employees.  These prospective applicants are often the best match for their open positions. You can use the same idea. Go to LinkedIn and search for contacts you can make who currently work for your former competitor. 5.  Recruiters and hiring managers prefer chronological resumes. This does not mean you cannot add a section clearly describing your attributes suitable to the particular position for which you may apply. Attribute descriptions are best done through a cover letter. 6.  Use your Contacts.  Nowadays, everyone has a friend, family member or neighbor who is out of work, creating an environment where we are all willing to go a little bit farther to help others in their job search.  Quite often, a "stranger," referred by a friend or colleague, makes contact  by email about a referral or help with their job search. This is an opportunity to exchange information.   Don't be afraid to ask for help, you will get it.  Right now people love to help others in this job crisis. And, you may run across a job in your job search not a match for you personally, but is the perfect match for someone you know who is looking. (workersxzcompxzkit) Information  provided by Interview with Katrina Paglierani of National Job Finders.  www.nationaljobfinders.com/welcome. Thank you, Katrina, for your insightful contribution. National Job Finders, finds jobs for injured workers who cannot return to their pre-injury positions due to a work-related injury. Author:  Rebecca Shafer, J.D.  consults for mid-market and national accounts focusing on project management, risk management assessments, data review, benchmarking, and development of Workers' Compensation and Injury Management Programs. Projects focus on development of training and education programs, document design, evaluation and integration of insurance claims administration and TPA services. Contact her at:   RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com Budding writer? Contribute articles* (300+ words) on WC cost containment. Contact us at: Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker about workers' comp issues.

©2009 Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law. If you would like permission to reprint this material, contact Info@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com

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