WCRI Recap: 3 Factors That Most Impact Worker Outcomes

WCRI Recap – 3 Part Series

  1. WCRI Recap – Impact of Donald Trump and 2016 Election
  2. WCRI Recap: 3 Factors That Most Impact Worker Outcomes
  3. WCRI Recap: Single Biggest Factor To Turn-Around Opioid Crisis

It’s been two weeks since the WCRI Conference recently held in Boston. I’m Michael Stack with Amaxx and today I want to give you some highlights and recap from that recent conference, from the notes that I took and the perspective that I had on it. The second session was about worker outcomes and what impacts, based on studies and research to define the best outcome.

 

 

What are those factors that we can address? For me, this was the most interesting and impactful session for what I do, which is work with employers, insurance brokers and educating best in class programs. This session is one that I found extraordinarily valuable to get an understanding of, what are those things that impact the outcomes that we can address at the beginning a claim and make sure our success is that much more likely.

 

 

Single Biggest Factor That Impacts Claim Outcome

 

This is a study I’ve quoted a number of times. It was published by WCRI a few years back and they came out with a study and said, “The biggest single factor based on their research that impacts the outcome of that claim is trust.” The biggest single factor that outcome impacts the outcome of a claim, is the amount of trust between an employee and an employer. Hugely important point. Hugely important factor to understand. Now, we’ve seen that one before.

 

 

 

How Does Supervisor Respond to Injury?

 

Glen Pransky from Liberty Mutual gave a presentation about some of their research and their studies. I found it extraordinarily interesting and valuable. Here’s what they came up with. Two different things that impact their outcomes, one of the biggest factors, all things being equal, if how does the supervisor respond to the injured worker at the moment that claim is reported. I’m going to say that again. How does the supervisor respond to the injured worker at the moment that that claim is reported. Do they respond with blame and anger and frustration? There’s that lack of trust there. They’re not trusting that the employee maybe said they get injured and they say, “Yeah, right. You didn’t get injured. Get back to work.”  Or, “How could you do that wrong? You are now in trouble.” That lack of trust there. So, how does that supervisor respond to that injured worker at the time of injury? All things being equal, if they respond positively, it’s going to have a significantly better claim outcome. If they respond negatively, a significantly worse claim outcome. That was number one, “How does a supervisor respond to the injured worker at the time that claim is reported?”

 

 

 

How Does Insurance Adjuster Respond to Injured Worker?

 

Number two, how’s the insurance adjuster respond or how is that first interaction with the injured worker go? Are they using big insurance words that the injured worker doesn’t understand? Things like adjudication and calling him the claimant and all these different things that really foster this lack of trust that they’re going to be taken care of. So, if there’s all these things that they don’t understand and they don’t know what’s going to happen, what are they going to do? They’re going to make sure their rights are protected. They’re going to call an attorney and they’re going to be going down this path which makes the claim that much more complicated, because they had a poor interaction with a supervisor and their adjuster’s causing him all this adjudication. They say, “I don’t know what’s going on. I better look out for myself.” So, how you responding to the injured worker, how do those communication interactions, things to train on, things to work on.

 

 

 

Do You Think…

 

Here’s the next piece, which I thought was extremely interesting and something you need to input, impact into your program today. Starting today, do this on every single claim. Here’s what it was, they asked this question, it’s a highly predictive question of the outcome of that claim, “Is do you think, you’ll be back to work within four weeks without any restrictions?” Do you think, you will be back to work within four weeks without any restrictions? Do you think you’ll be back to work in four weeks without any restrictions? Highly, highly predictive question to ask of what that outcome of the claim is. If they say, “no” then you get to ask them why. “Why don’t you think you’ll be back to work?” You can bring in additional resources and support to drive that. If they say, “yes” then they’re setting that expectation in their own mind and it’s only going to drive that success to get them back to work. Highly predictive question and response to that claim’s outcome, “Do you think you’ll be back to work within four weeks without any restrictions?” Start asking that question, every single one of your claims today.

 

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

14 Points To Discuss With Your Injured Worker For Win-Win Outcome

A big mistake made by employers is leaving the injured employee to fend for himself / herself in the world of workers’ compensation.  For most injured employees, the injury is their first workers’ compensation claim and they do not know what to do or what to expect.  Fear of the unknown and not knowing what to expect creates a lot of angst in the employee.

 

 

Fear of Unknown Creates Angst in Injured Employee

 

The smart adjuster during the initial contact with the injured employee will take all the time necessary to answer the employee’s questions about medical treatment, lost wages, light duty return to work, and any other questions the employee might have.  The smart employer will also contact the injured employee and answer all the questions the employee might have about their work comp claim.  When neither the adjuster nor the employer answers the employee’s questions and concerns, the employee will usually find someone who will – an attorney.

 

We always recommend for the employer to call the injured employee immediately after the initial medical treatment.  They will want to ask what the doctor’s diagnosis and prognosis are, when the employee will be returning to work, and if the return to work date is not known, what the work restrictions are.

 

 

14 Points to Discuss With Your Injured Worker

 

  1. The injured employee should be asked to submit a detailed report of how the claim happen, preferably written
  2. Ask the injured employee who were the witnesses to the accident
  3. Verify the injured employee is treating at an employer selected medical provider, if your state allows the employer to select the medical provider
  4. Ask the injured employee if he has ever injured the same body part before, and if so, when
  5. Tell the injured employee you will send him/her a copy of the First Report of Injury being submitted to the insurance company, and ask them to review the Report and advise you if anything is inaccurate
  6. Ask the injured employee if he has discussed all pre-existing medical issues with the doctor (some medical issues like obesity will be obvious, others like hypertension or diabetes need to be disclosed to the medical provider)
  7. Explain to the injured employee how mileage to medical appointments is reimbursed in your state, and the mileage rate
  8. Explain to the injured employee the importance of attending every doctor’s appointment, diagnostic test and physical therapy session (if needed)
  9. If the injured employee is going to be off work, explain to him what the state’s waiting period is for indemnity benefits
  10. Explain to the injured employee how the indemnity benefits will be calculated by the insurance adjuster
  11. Ask the employee to call you after each medical appointment to let you know the doctor’s current plan of treatment
  12. Advise the injured employee to obtain an off-work slip at each doctor’s appointment
  13. Ask the injured employee if he has any questions in regards to how the transitional duty program works
  14. Ask the injured employee if he has any questions about any other aspect of how their workers’ compensation claim will be handled

 

Yes, this is a lot of information to review, and it will take you an extra five minutes.  However, the extra five minutes spent making sure the employee understands how everything will work in their workers’ compensation claim can be the most productive five minutes of your day.  By taking the concerned and caring approach, you will eliminate most of the hassles and headaches that occur when a work comp claim goes bad and save a lot more time later in the claim process.

 

 

On-Going Contact Will Avoid Many Problems

 

Managing and assisting the injured employee does not end with the initial follow up phone call to the employee.  The employee should be encouraged to call you after each medical appointment, and he does not do so, you should call the employee.  Any questions the employee has during the recovery period can be addressed timely in this manner.  By maintaining on-going contact throughout the time the employee is off work, you will avoid most of the problems that can occur with a work comp claim.  You will also be assisting the employee in returning to work the minimal amount of time.

 

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

3 Steps to Discover the Root Cause of Work Injury

A near miss may be the best thing that ever happens at your company. Depending on what you do afterward, it can be a huge opportunity to save money and headaches.

 

After the initial ‘phew!’ reaction, it’s time to get down to business and find out what happened and why and, most importantly, what you can do to prevent a recurrence that could result in an injury and comp claim the next time.

 

Fact is, most (probably all) workplace accidents have multiple causes. Even the seemingly simple-to-explain incident likely has several underlying factors going on. By getting to the real root of the problem you can avoid potentially costly and preventable claims.

 

Root Cause Analysis

 

Delving into the true causes of workplace injuries requires a team effort, though it doesn’t need to be all that complicated. There are a variety of frameworks for ‘root cause analyses.’  There are templates to make it easier to organize the information. Some organizations use a fishbone diagram to group causes into major categories to identify variation sources. Whatever system is used, there are several keys to successful root cause analysis.

 

  1. Do NOT assign blame! This is the most important aspect in getting to the real root of a problem. It’s tempting to blame someone, punish him, and move on, but that doesn’t fix the underlying problems. Root cause analysis must be done without any finger pointing. Remember, most workplace accidents are the result of a confluence of contributing factors. The job of RCA is to identify and correct them.

 

  1. Ask questions. Then ask more. And a few more after that. The main questions to ask: WHY? You may feel like a 2-year-old asking ‘why, why, why’ – but this is key to getting to the crux of the analysis. As an example, let’s say “Fred” fell off a ladder and, luckily, was not seriously injured. It might be easy to say, ‘well, Fred was being careless, he was in too much of a hurry, so it’s his fault.’ But asking ‘why’ will uncover important details that would prevent future such incidents. The answer to the first ‘why’ could be that one of the rungs on the ladder broke. ‘Why,’ you ask again, and find out it could not hold Fred’s weight. If the rungs were designed to hold 350 lbs. and Fred weighs only 170, what was the extra weight? You discover Fred was carrying materials up the ladder and the combined weight exceeded 350 lbs. But the company has a hoist truck for such jobs, so why was Fred not using it instead of carrying the materials himself? Turns out the hoist truck was being used elsewhere. So why didn’t Fred wait until the hoist truck was available? Because he was under the gun to get the job finished on time and would have missed the deadline otherwise.

 

From the example, several problems come to light. There were not enough hoist trucks available, the ladder’s weight restrictions were ignored, and the deadline did not allow for the job to be done properly. Those are only some of the issues. With continued delving, there would likely be additional factors that contributed to the accident.

 

  1. Get all relevant information — and then some. In addition to the obvious details such as interviews with witnesses, examining any video footage of the incident, and speaking with the injured — or nearly injured — worker, other considerations include:

 

  • The environment. Was the ladder properly placed on the floor? Was there anything surrounding it that might have contributed?
  • Training and skill level. Did Fred have training on using the ladder? Did he understand the weight limit? Had he ever used the ladder before? Was he instructed to avoid carrying materials up the ladder (which, aside from the weight limit, could have caused him to fall)?
  • Was there a specific procedure in place for using ladders? If so, was that procedure communicated to Fred and other employees? Was the procedure ever updated, and the updates communicated? Were workers known to circumvent the procedures?
  • Was it properly maintained? Was there enough available? Had any relevant equipment been updated as needed?
  • Human behavior. We found out Fred was in a rush due to deadline pressure. But why — what were the consequences of not meeting the deadline? Were there too few employees working on the particular job?

 

The Fix

Once you’ve ascertained all the causes (and potential causes) of the incident, it’s time to figure out corrective action. All the ‘why’ questions should end with something that indicates what and how something should be changed.

 

In our Fred scenario, several things could be changed to make the organization run more efficiently and with less chance for an injury. Training would be one area, for example. Fred clearly did not understand (or did not care) that carrying materials on the ladder could exceed the weight limit of the rungs. Procedures may need to be reviewed and changed to prevent people from carrying heavy or awkward items while climbing a ladder.

 

Equipment might need to be upgraded, perhaps with an investment in an additional hoist truck would be warranted. Communication might need to be ramped up to ensure that, while meeting a deadline is important, attention to safety is more important.

 

Conclusion

Workplace accidents, unfortunately, happen and may result in injuries and workers’ comp claims. However, the same incident should never be repeated within an organization.

 

By digging deep you can identify a variety of factors that could lead to an injury. Taking corrective action will help ensure workers stay safe, the job gets done, and you’re not wasting money on preventable problems.

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Leverage 2 Super Bowl Tactics To Drive Your Work Comp Comeback

Hello. Michael Stack here with Amaxx. So yesterday was Superbowl 51. If you missed the game or you went to bed early, kind of like my wife did, you missed the most exciting and improbable comeback in Superbowl history by one of the greatest teams and greatest quarterbacks in history as well. Of course the New England Patriots were down 28 points to 3 late in the third quarter, a 25 point deficit, but Tom Brady was able to rally the team together. Tied up in regulation, and then of course they went on to win in overtime.

 

 

2 Tactics Patriots Levered to Win Super Bowl

 

What are those things? What are those tactics? What are those characteristics that the Patriots were able to tap into that led to that extraordinary comeback? It’s going to be talking about in today’s video and how you can use those same tactics to have extraordinary success in your Worker’s Comp Management Program.

 

Let’s talk about what these things are. The two elements that they leveraged were momentum and expectation. Momentum and expectation. Momentum and expectation. Now, love the Patriots or hate them, they have an expectation to win. Tom Brady has an expectation to win. When their team was down late in the third quarter and they scored that first touchdown to make it 28 to 9, they started to capture some of that momentum. When Tom Brady in the huddle said, “We’re going to win this game,” the expectation was that I believe you. You don’t have to convince me, because that expectation has been ingrained in their heads for years and years as part of the Patriots culture. They captured that momentum and they continued to ride that through the end of the game. You knew when it went to overtime, it was almost guaranteed that the Patriots were going to win that game, because they had captured such strong momentum.

 

 

How Timely Are You Making Safety Repairs?

 

Let’s talk about your Workers Comp Management Program and how this looks and how this can be applied. I have a question for you. I want you to answer this question honestly for yourself. If you asked your workforce on a scale of one to ten how timely are system safety repairs and changes being made, that’s your expectation. Let me ask that one more time. If you were to ask your workforce on a scale of one to ten how timely are system safety repairs and changes being made. This is an an example of, say the guard needs to be replaced, say there’s water that’s spilled on the floor, say your workforce makes other safety recommendations for changes. How timely are you actually physically making those repairs? You’re setting your employees’ expectation for how much you care about them.

 

If they don’t see you making the changes, if you haven’t replaced the guard in six months, if there’s water spilled on the floor and no one addresses it or no one puts up the signs, that’s the expectation for care. When that individual gets injured, they think well these guys could give a _____ about me because they never fix the guard. You’re telling them about your return to work program and how much you care about them and how you’re going to work together to get them back to work, and they say, “Yeah, right. You couldn’t even fix the guard in the first place.” They’re carrying that momentum with them into the injury.

 

 

Create A Winning Culture of CARE At Your Organization

 
Can you imagine, then, if Tom Brady didn’t have this winning culture, this winning history, that winning expectation and he’s in the huddle, and he tells his guys, “We’re going to win this game.” They’re going to say, “Yeah, right. We’re down 25 points. It’s the end of the third quarter. There’s no way that’s going to happen.” That’s the expectation. They had that carried into and they were able to win that game.

 

Let’s talk about that addressing those points, addressing those safety points, keeping that, building that positive momentum, so that you care about them. You’ve made all the safety changes. You’re on top of it. Then their expectation is that you’re going to care about them and you’re going to work together for much more successful Workers Compensation Injury Management Program.

 

Again, I’m Michael Stack with Amaxx, and if you’re watching this video somewhere other than http://reduceyourworkerscomp.com go ahead and go to that website. Sign up for our newsletter for a lot more free information and tips on how to control your workers comp costs. Let’s take it one step further. You can go to http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining and sign up for my next live stream training.

 

Again, I’m Michael Stack. Remember, your success in Workers Compensation is defined by your integrity. So be great!

 

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining.com

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

NIOSH Webinar Q&A: Not Everyone Wants To Return To Work

NIOSH Center for Workers’ Compensation Studies recently hosted a webinar, Return to Work: A foundational approach to return to function, based on the IAIABC Return to Work whitepaper (access whitepaper here).  The goal of this session was for speakers to share the benefits and possible strategies for workers’ compensation stakeholders to work toward developing, implementing, and/or supporting return to work as an integral part of return to health.

 

There were many questions from the audience, find response below:

 

Question: Do we see any plans to try to include the employee’s general practitioner in a case to be a part of the team with a goal of function? 

 

Michael Stack: The recommended best practice in working with medical providers is a working partnership between the employer, employee, and provider. 

 

Vickie Kennedy: This partnership can be supported by the regulator, and facilitated through services offered by the insurer. 

 

Michael Stack: Each party plays an active role in returning an injured employee to work.  Depending on state law, this medical provider may or may not be an employee’s general practitioner or a provider of their choice. In addition, this practitioner may or may not have an understanding of occupational medicine, or the employer’s pro-active return to work program, if there is one.

 

Employers are encouraged to gain cooperation from medical providers by developing a good working relationship with a local clinic; invite the provider to your facility, provide job descriptions, and demonstrate commitment to returning employees to work.  When an employee is treating with their general practitioner, this physician should absolutely become a part of the team with a goal toward return to function.  Employers can help form a relationship with this provider by providing information about your company, transitional duty program, and commitment to employee’s well-being.

 

Vickie Kennedy: Insurers can assist this effort by helping employers develop return-to-work programs and light-duty jobs before injuries happen, and by offering incentives for bringing a worker back to a job while they heal.  These services are particularly critical for smaller employers.  They can help workers maintain motivation through relationships with claim managers and by providing vocational support and counseling.

 

 

Question: An example: a clinical patient care RN tears a rotator cuff, department accommodates the restrictions during the slow season, shows up late and spends much of the time texting. After surgery the worker is again accommodated with restrictions but shoulder outcome goes downhill resulting in encapsulation and restrictions of no movement away from body and lifting only 5-10 lbs. Then the restrictions went to no use of the arm.

 

Our hospital had no deskwork outside of her department, you’re not saying that a job should be created to accommodate a worker are you? The department had to fill her position after 6 months as there was not improvement on the horizon.

 

Michael Stack:  The three keys to return to work are Individual, Creative, and Flexible. 

 

First, an employee that is on transitional duty should not be treated any differently than an employee on full duty. What is the consequence of showing up late and texting on full duty?  This same consequence should apply on light duty.

 

Second, while this hospital has a return to work program, it is not effective. Employees should be put in a position that is productive for them and the company.  What are this person’s individual talents and skills? What are some productive tasks that can be completed that no one has time for? ASK the employee and supervisors for ideas, there are likely many productive jobs she can do. Without knowing the circumstances of this case, the failure of the first return to work position could have impacted the failure of this employee’s recovery.

 

Finally, your question regarding creating a new position falls under the ADA laws.  For workers’ compensation purposes, light duty should last no more than 90 days and be progressive throughout that time frame.  Under the ADA, can she perform full duty with a reasonable accommodation? If the person does reach MMI and still can’t return to full duty, even with a reasonable accommodation, then the employer must consider reassignment to an existing vacant position, as a reasonable accommodation.  If there is no work that the person can do, even with a reasonable accommodation, then he/she may be terminated.   

 

 

Question: It seems that you risk an employee claiming a new exacerbation when they are returned when they would rather not be at work, sad to say, not everyone wants to work.

 

Michael Stack: The assumption that an injured employee wants to be out of work may or may not be accurate.

 

Vickie Kennedy: There are several factors that may be at play here: the worker’s fear of re-injury, their relationship with the supervisor and the supervisor’s support for the employer’s return-to-work program are just a couple of examples.

 

Michael Stack: The best way to ensure compliance with a return to work program is to communicate your policy before an injury occurs, then reinforce the process at the time of injury.  Most employees have not had a previous workers’ compensation injury, so they don’t know what to expect.  A simple employee brochure outlining your policy, the employers’ role, and the employees’ role is an effective tool.

 

If the employee truly doesn’t want to return to work and has accrued annual or sick leave, then he or she has the right to use it just like other employees.  And if the employee is entitled to FMLA leave, then the employer would need to provide the required leave.  But if the employee has no leave available, and if everyone agrees that the return-to-work assignment is consistent with the employee’s medical needs, then the employer can require the individual to return.  It would be just like requiring someone who hasn’t been injured to come to work, even if he or she would prefer to stay home.*state laws vary, please consult your attorney.

 

 

Access IAIABC Whitepaper: Return to Work: A Foundational Approach to Return to Function 

 

 

Author. Vickie Kennedy, Assistant Director of Insurance Services for the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries in the US. Vickie manages one of the nation’s largest workers’ compensation insurers. She oversees approximately 1,000 employees involved with L&I’s State Fund workers’ compensation functions including Claims Administration, Employer Services (Policy and Account Management), Health Services Analysis (management of provider fee schedule and medical cost containment efforts), Office of the Medical Director, and the Self-Insurance program. Contact: Victoria.kennedy@lni.wa.gov.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining.com

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Utilize Different Return To Work Approach For Different Employees

During the course of business, employers will find that all employees are not the same.  Speaking differently to each employee in order to get the same result is normal and necessary to keep business flowing steadily each day.  It only stands to reason that the same approach should hold true when working with employees to get them quickly and safely back to work after a worker’s compensation claim.

 

 

Different Return to Work Approach For Different Employees

 

There are many different return-to-work programs that can be utilized, but they should be matched with specific employees’ personalities to get the most successful results.  While one employee may respond well to several phone calls a week, another may find that to be too intrusive.  Finding the balance is the key to getting employees back to work.

 

There are primarily four different employee personality types ranging from fully satisfied to completely unsatisfied.  The four types of employees:

 

  • Satisfied-Active– one who is happy and needs no coercion or prodding to return to work.
  • Satisfied-Passive– one who is happy, but complacent with staying out of work.
  • Dissatisfied-Passive– one who is unhappy, but does not willfully concoct schemes to stay out of work. However, they may take advantage of the system to stay out longer.
  • Dissatisfied-Active– one who is very unhappy with his/her situation and will actively attempt to take advantage of the system.

 

The majority of employees will fall under one of these description categories and will respond similarly to different return-to-work strategies.  Handling each situation according to the personalities of the employees is the best tactic.

 

 

Suit The Personality Of The Employee

 

For example, a satisfied-active employee might be someone who has not missed a day of work in 10 years, plays on the company softball team, and is always looked to as a go-getter.  A workers comp claim might be perceived as a setback to this type of individual and little or no interaction from the employer will be necessary in order to get him to return to work. A recommended strategy is to send a get well card and work in partnership to provide a productive transitional duty position; activity such as aggressive surveillance can have the opposite effect and make the employee unwilling to return to work.

 

An active-dissatisfied employee in the same situation will take a completely different approach and have a higher likelihood to abuse the system.  Employers of active-dissatisfied employees will need to take a much more agressive approach including implementing fraud prevention measures, hiring investigators, and having almost constant contact with the employee in order to get him back to work.

 

Without using a different return to work approach to suit the personality of the employee, the employer can inadvertently stall the process.

 

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining.com

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Return-To-Work: Create a Win/Win in Your Work Comp Program

Notwithstanding the conventional wisdom, injured workers of any age have an interest in returning to work.  Sadly this is often an over-looked part of many programs as employers and interested stakeholders focus on other issues.  Now is the time to change this thought process.  This is based on the reality that any workers’ compensation program can create a win for everyone by focusing on return-to-work.

 

 

Challenges When it Comes to Return-To-Work

 

There are many challenges employers and other stakeholders face when creating or revamping their return to work program.  Due to these barriers, the people in charge of the program decide to move on and focus on other aspects of their programs.  Some of the main challenges faced by workers’ compensation programs include:

 

  • The aging American workforce. Continued anemic economic growth places pressures on the average American’s pocketbook.  This has changed the thought process by employees, as they get older.  When an injury occurs, employers and members of the claim management team face challenges of extended vocational rehabilitation, the possibility of retraining and the ugly specter of a permanent total disability (PTD) claim.

 

  • The ongoing opioid drug epidemic. Change will only occur in the overuse and abuse of prescription opioid-based medications only when the hearts and minds of Americans demand real action.  Until that time, all parties charged with the role of defending a workers’ compensation claim will need to keep an eye on this issue.

 

Countless other factors impact workers’ compensation claims management.  One practical and fundamental solution is to reduce the costs in a workers’ compensation program through an effective and efficient return-to-work program.

 

 

Return-To-Work: Creating a Win/Win Mentality

 

The beauty of an effective return-to-work program is that it reduces the inherent tension within the adversarial workers’ compensation system and creates a win for everyone.  While it may take some work, the cost savings are immense.

 

 

Creating a Win for Employees

 

Countless studies demonstrate that an injured work, regardless of age or time spent in the workforce, want to return to work following an injury.  When a workers’ compensation program is set up correctly, there is a “win” for the employee.

 

  • Productivity: If an employee is able to return-to-work, they remain productive.  This leads to a sense of satisfaction for anyone recovering from even a severe workplace injury.

 

  • Maintaining a Consistent Work Schedule. There are numerous intangibles associated with a consistent work schedule.  Instead of sitting at home while they recover, people who are working, even reduced hours, have a more positive attitude.

 

  • Feeling safe allows anyone to be more productive.  Safety and security in knowing you have a job results in greater financial and emotional security.

 

 

Creating a Win for Employers

 

A well return-to-work program also creates the sense of a win for employers.  This allows the stakeholders on this end of the equation to see value in all employees—regardless of ability or restrictions.

 

  • Decreasing Work Comp Exposure. Once and employee demonstrates the ability to return to work, the future exposures in any program dramatically decrease.  These savings are found on the indemnity, vocational rehabilitation and medical portions of a claim.

 

  • Effective Cost Containment. In addition to decreasing costs, an effective return-to-work will allow the program to better anticipate future expenses and effectively allocate scarce resources.

 

  • Employee Retention. Any successful employer retains its employees and reduces the loss of institutional memory from leaving when turnover occurs.  Keeping employees on the job following an injury also allows that employer to spend less time and money identifying new talent and recruiting new employees.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Employers seeking to reduce their workers’ compensation program costs need to make an investment in their return-to-work program.  It also has numerous benefits that reduces the tension of the workers’ compensation progress and allows for all involved to win.

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

Live Stream WC Training: http://workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining.com

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Top 5 Take Away Points 2016 National Work Comp & Disability Conf – Part 1

Top 5 Take Away Points 2016 National Work Comp & Disability Conf – Part 1

Top 5 Take Away Points 2016 National Work Comp & Disability Conf – Part 2

Top 5 Take Away Points 2016 National Work Comp & Disability Conf – Part 3

 

Hello, Michael Stack here with Amaxx. So I just got back from New Orleans, Louisiana; I might be too much of a Northerner to pull off that pronunciation, but nevertheless it was a great time and very valuable time spent at the National Work Comp and Disability Conference last week.

 

 

It’s Not The Time Spent At The Conference, It’s What You Do With That Time

 

We spent a lot of time and we spent a lot of money to attend this conference. Very valuable networking, very valuable meetings, very valuable sessions, but it’s not about the time spent there, it’s about what you do with that time that was spent there, whether it’s follow-up appointments, whether it’s follow-up conversations, or whether it’s taking some of the information from the sessions and now implementing that in your program.

 

 

Take Away Point #1: Return To Work To Heal

 

So I want to talk to you about my top five take-away implementation points from the sessions that I attended. The first point then came from Marcos Iglesias, the medical director at The Hartford. He talked about this idea through his presentation. It was all about really this understanding of the culture of return to work in a program. He talked about return to work to heal, not heal to return to work. So return to work to heal, not heal to return to work. That mindset, that methodology through the workforce, though the medical providers, and through the culture of a company, huge take-away point. Transfer now to the Teddy Award winning presentations.

 

 

Jennifer Massey from Harder Mechanical Contractors. She talked about this idea, and it was very much in the regards to this challenge that a lot of employers have to say, “Well, we don’t have any transitional duty. There’s nothing that we have available for our guys. We would return them to work but we just don’t have any jobs available.” So she took that job, and their company is very unique in that they’re very specialized, highly-skilled, union contractors. Some would say that’s an impossible scenario to deal with, but they’ve had 17 million hours without a lost time plan, very significant stat.

 

 

Here’s how they do it. They engage their workforce to work together to define and create meaningful transitional duty jobs. So if you look at their work force, very skilled labor, maybe they have a highly trained skill in Skill A. But maybe they also have a skill in Skill B or Skill C, and they can work together to engage their workforce, there’s a high level of trust, they have this idea embedded in their culture that return to work to heal for the benefit of the employee and the benefit of the company.

 

 

Both sides get it and both sides are engaged in this creative process to engage the workforce, understand what their skill set is, match them up with a need in the company that’s meaningful for the company and meaningful for the individual to now get that person returning to work so that they can heal. So very significant take-away point in really that mindset, and then action of how you do that in a program.

 

Continued…

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

2 Must Have Concepts For Your Injury Response Message

High quality, and simple. High quality, and simple. High quality, and simple. Those two concepts are the cornerstones of the clothing brand Patagonia’s business philosophy.

 

 

High Quality & Simple

 

 

I’m Michael Stack with Amaxx, and I was recently up in Freeport, Maine with my wife celebrating our eighth year anniversary on a little getaway. Now, she needed a raincoat so we spent some time in the Patagonia outlet, and I picked up the book written by their founder Yvon Chouinard. As I was reading it that day and later following to finish it, these two concepts resonated throughout the 258-page book for their business success and the foundation of that company.

 

 

Employee’s Bombarded With Information

 

It got me really thinking as I was reading this book, is how these two concepts can really be applied to Workers’ Compensation, particularly in the communication and the messaging to our employees. Because the reality is that employees today are just bombarded with information on a day-to-day basis of things that they need to understand, and a lot of times need to put into action. The other reality is that Workers’ Compensation for employees that are not injured, it’s just not that high of a priority. When they become injured it does become a high priority, and then that information that you are giving them needs to be extraordinarily high quality and extraordinarily simple. My recommendation is to have you take a look at your messaging of what you want your employees to do at the time of injury, whether you’re giving them a wallet card, you have posters on the walls at your organization in the shop, or maybe it’s even signs within your trucks. How simple is that information? What information can be taken away to improve the quality of that messaging?

 

 

Injury Triage

 

My recommendation here is to work with an injury triage provider, that you can get an 800 number to call that they can talk to a medical professional 24 hours a day. Then the only message that they really need to remember in the midst of all this overwhelm of information is that any time you have an injury, no matter how minor, just go ahead and call that number and we’ll take care of you from there.

 

Again, I’m Michael Stack with Amaxx. If you’re watching this video somewhere other than reduceyourworkerscomp.com, go ahead and go to that website and sign up to receive a lot more free information about how to control your Workers’ Comp costs. To take it one step further, I’d love for you to join me on my next live stream training. Go ahead and go to workerscompclub.com/livestreamtraining. Remember, your success in Workers’ Compensation is defined by your integrity. This’ll be great.

 

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment.

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

Say NO to “No Work” Doctor Diagnosis in Workers Comp Claims

The treating physician is the “gatekeeper” to return to work.  An important part of transitional work programs is getting the injured employees’ treating physicians to agree to their patients’ participation.

 

  • The first step is to obtain an agreement from the treating physician not to prescribe “no work” for the employee without first discussing the matter with the employer. An injured employee may be able to function in a transitional work capacity much sooner if the employer is an active participant in the decision making process.

 

  • Secondly, employers should ensure their medical advisors or physician consultants remain in regular contact with all treating physicians. The company doctor should receive periodic reports on the patient’s progress, as well as proactively communicate with the treating physician transitional work job descriptions. The treating physician can determine if the patient is able to perform the tasks listed in the description, as well as whether the employee can work in any capacity.

 

Transitional work programs are common at employer work-sites. However, the simple existence of a transitional duty program does not mean it’s operating with maximum effectiveness or efficiency.

 

Employers who take a more active role in coordinating the activities of the injured employee and the treating physician will generate the expectation that the employee will return to work in some capacity within a specified period of time. This will result in shorter and less costly workers’ compensation claims costs.

 

 

For additional information on workers’ compensation cost containment best practices, register as a guest for our next live stream training.

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment.

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

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