4 More Ways to Spring Clean Your Workers’ Comp Program

Spring is here and it’s time to clean out the junk in your garage and trim the bushes. As we go through our annual spring cleaning ritual at home, it’s also time to take a look at tuning up your workers’ compensation practices.

 

See 5 Ways to Spring Clean Your Workers’ Comp Program

 

Here are 4 additional ways to spring clean your workers’ comp program:

 

 

Cooperate Fully with the Claims Adjusters

 

Stay in contact with all your injured employees who have not returned to work. In addition, make the commitment to stay in contact with the claims adjuster(s) handling your work comp claims.

  • You work comp claims coordinator should be exchanging information with the adjuster(s) on all claims on a regular basis. You may know important information that will assist the adjuster in bringing the claim to a speedy conclusion.
  • Or, the adjuster can coordinate with the nurse case manager on the information you provided about the employee’s medical concerns.

 

 

Update the Medical Treatment Panel

 

If you have not revisited your posting on required medical providers (or recommended medical providers in the states where the employee selects the medical provider), now is an excellent time to do so. Set up a conference call and consult with the work comp adjuster(s) and the nurse case manager(s) on your work comp claims.

 

  • Do any of the doctors on your medical treatment panel list seem to keep employees off work longer than others?
  • Do any of the doctors seem to have to operate on employees more than other doctors?
  • Do any of the doctors on your medical treatment panel fail to provide timely medical reports to the adjuster(s) or nurse case manager(s). .
  • Are there any doctors the adjuster(s) or nurse case manager(s) would recommend to be added to your medical treatment panel?

 

Use the Expert Panel if your TPA has one.  If your TPA doesn’t have one, consider changing your TPA.

 

 

Fight Fraud Religiously

 

An excellent spring renewal is to fight fraud. In addition to your anti-fraud posters, start a fraud hotline for other employees to report fraud anonymously to a tip-line.

 

  • Offer a reward for anyone who reports a work comp fraud that results in a criminal conviction.
  • Make sure all your employees know about your Return To Work Program that will prevent them from being off work any longer than is necessary.
  • Always report any suspicious claim to the Special Investigations Unit of the insurer.

 

 

Improve Your Medical Management Program

 

Make the commitment to maximize your medical management program. Review all your programs to control medical cost.

 

  • Consider ways you can improve your use of nurse case managers, utilization reviews, pharmacy benefit managers, medical fee bill reviews, durable medical equipment, independent medical examinations and peer reviews.
  • Seriously consider Injury Triage for all injuries. Employees love it and it will reduce your claims volume significantly.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

5 Ways to Spring Clean Your Workers’ Comp Program

Spring is here and it’s time to clean out the junk in your garage and trim the bushes. As we go through our annual spring cleaning ritual at home, it’s also time to take a look at tuning up your workers’ compensation practices.

 

 

Improve Safety

 

A safe workplace is the best way to reduce workers compensation cost. Now is an excellent time to renew your commitment to safety.

  1. review your safety program for ways to improve your safety training,
  2. update the job hazard analysis of every job position within the company,
  3. review the qualifications of the members of your safety committee
  4. schedule the work-site evaluations and safety inspections for the year
  5. update the safety manual to cover new equipment, new machinery or new job positions
  6. review your safety posters, safety brochures and other employee safety communications

 

 

Report All Claims Timely

 

If a review of your loss run reflects that you have claims that were not reported the same day as the accident, a great spring cleaning task is to review your claim reporting procedures to be sure all claims are reported timely (the day of the accident). All department managers or location supervisors should be trained to report all injuries to the company’s claims coordinator or directly to the claims office immediately after they have arranged transportation to the medical provider. Timely reporting allows the work comp claims adjuster to investigate properly, establish compensability and better control the course of the workers’ compensation claim.

 

 

Keep in Touch with All Injured Employees

 

Make the commitment to show your injured employees that your company has a human side and does care about their well-being. For every injured employee who has not returned to work, mark on your calendar when you want to contact them. A contact schedule that you can modify as needed would be to:

 

  1. contact the injured employee the day of the accident (First Day Phone Call)
  2. contact the employee 2 days after the accident to make sure they understand the WC procedures and process, and answer any questions they have. Make yourself available. (Follow-up Phone Call)
  3. invite the employee to attend all workplace functions even if they are not working in the workplace temporarily.
  4. have the employee attend a Weekly Meeting until the employee is back to work. Use Weekly Meeting Guidelines to structure these meetings and make notes.

 

 

Stay Current on All Work Comp Claims

 

Closely related to staying in touch with the injured employee is staying current on ALL of your work comp claims. Make the commitment to do so.

 

  • During these contacts with the employee ask the employee the status of their medical treatment and when the doctor may be able to let them to return to work either full duty or on modified duty.
  • Stress to the employee that the work they do for your company is important and that you need them, not some new hire, doing their job. If you have employees you haven’t communicated with, now is the time to reconnect with them.
  • We worked with a large bread company and when the risk manager started his job there were 45 employees out of work. We directed him to invite each to lunch and ask them when they could come back to work. Twenty said they could come back to work “now” but that no one had asked them to return to work up until that lunch. A good lesson about why to stay on top of all of your claims.

 

Do not rely solely on the employees for information about their work comp claims, call the adjuster on a regular basis to discuss treatment status, return to work status and any permanent partial disability which will require modification of the employees job position. Hold bi-weekly or weekly roundtables with the adjuster to discuss a rotating selection of claims.

 

 

Improve Your Return To Work Program

 

If your idea of light duty return to work is to have the employee count paper clips, now is the time to commit to improve your Return To Work Program. A good place to start would be to review our website and all the information we provide to employers on managing your Return To Work Program.

 

 

Your commitment to RTW should include:

 

  • On every lost time claim to take the time to contact the medical provider and ask that the employee be allowed to return to work on light duty.
  • Make sure to provide the medical provider with a complete job description so the medical provider can place the appropriate restrictions on the employees workability.
  • You should have > 95% returning to work within 1-4 days after the injury.

 

 

Summary:

 

Spring is a time for renewal. If you follow through with your commitments, your workers’ compensation program will bloom and prosper.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

How Star Wars Nailed the First Step in Workers’ Comp Management

Hey there, Michael Stack here, CEO of Amaxx. So this past weekend my wife was gone for the weekend. She was visiting one of her good friends from college, from Lehigh University, who’s actually was the maid of honor in our wedding up in Saratoga, New York. So whenever she’s gone, I like to take the opportunity to watch some movies that maybe she wouldn’t really like quite so much. So I was able to watch The Godfather and then I also watched Star Wars The Last Jedi, the latest Star Wars movie that I hadn’t seen yet.

 

 

“Don’t Worry, We’re With The Resistance”

 

In that movie, in The Last Jedi, there’s one scene which encapsulates and demonstrates so well a critical, critical, element of worker’s compensation management. Actually when I work with a company, one of the first things that I often recommend that they do. So here was the scene, there’s two characters Finn and Rose, and they go on an adventure of course to save the galaxy. On their adventure, they encounter a little boy, and they need his help. The little boy of course is scared. One thing they say to him, is they say, “Don’t worry, we’re with The Resistance.” And they show the little badge and they show The Resistance icon. In that little statement, in that little exchange, they demonstrated a number of very important things.

 

 

Identify, Branding, Meaning

 

One was identity. They demonstrated their identity. Number two, was the branding. They had the logo in order to identify themselves and demonstrate that visually. Number three, most importantly, was the meaning behind it. Identity, branding, and meaning. In one little exchange they were able to get the trust and understanding of that little boy and demonstrate what it is that they’re there to do. In an instant.

 

 

ACME IPAR Program

 

If you take this concept and you look at your work comp management program, your injured worker is scared, they don’t know what to expect, they don’t know what is coming next. If you can demonstrate to them and create some branding, create this name around it. An example I love to use, is the Acme, if the Acme is your company, the Acme IPAR, the Acme Injury Prevention and Recovery program. You create an identity and a branding campaign around that, so that you can know and demonstrate in an instant the meaning of what is going to happen next to that injured worker.

 

If you can put some thought into that, if can brainstorm around that, if you can create this identity, create this brand, and attach it to that meaning of what to expect next, you will win the worker’s compensation battle. Again, I’m Michael Stack, CEO of Amaxx. Remember your work today in worker’s compensation can have a dramatic impact in your company’s bottle line. But it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life, so be great.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

11 Ways Supervisors Can Enhance Your Workers’ Compensation Program

11 Ways Supervisors Can Enhance Your Workers’ Compensation ProgramSupervisors are critically important to the effectiveness of your injury management program. They are often the first person on the scene of a workplace accident and may know the injured worker better than anyone else in the organization. They set the tone for how well the injured worker responds and engages in the recovery process.

 

Employees in charge of other workers who view their role in the workers’ compensation process as just an annoyance do a disservice to injured workers and the organization. Employers should take steps to ensure supervisors appreciate the value of the workers’ compensation program and have a thorough understanding of how they can positively contribute to it.

 

 

Injury Response

 

While some organizations have detailed step-by-step plans in place for handling workplace injuries, many don’t; or even if they do, most employees are typically not well versed in the protocol. That’s why it is imperative to continually train supervisors on all the various aspects of the workers’ compensation system and how they fit into it.

 

For example, if one of your workers went to his supervisor after sustaining an injury, how would the supervisor respond? Would he know, or have a list of steps to follow, a medical provider to treat the worker, if needed? Would he know to address the worker’s medical needs first?

 

Here are some of the initial procedures supervisors should have down pat:

 

  • Get injured worker medical attention. First and foremost, make sure the worker gets medical attention if needed. If so,

 

  • Where to go
  • How to get the worker there; i.e., should he drive himself, and, if not, who should drive him
  • What, if anything to take with him

 

  1. Communicate appropriately. Extensive research has been done on the impact of a supervisor’s language and tone toward an injured worker. Questioning the truthfulness of the worker, for example, can have a dramatic impact on outcomes. Negativity threatens the worker and research has shown the odds are there will be twice as many days out of work than if there is a positive response from the supervisor.

 

  1. Whom to contact. Is there a department/person/number the organization has for reporting injuries? For example, is there a nurse triage system in place?

 

  1. Initiate an investigation. While it may not involve a formal inquiry, the supervisor should speak with anyone with possible insight into the accident, such as the injured worker and any witnesses. Having such conversations as soon as possible after an incident is best for getting the most information when it is fresh in people’s minds.

 

  1. Take good notes. Any information from the injured worker, witnesses or anyone else who may know about the injury should be written down with as many details as possible. Documentation should include at least the basics — who, what, when, where, why and how.

 

 

After the Fact

 

Following-up on a workplace accident — or near miss — is also important, as that can go a long way in preventing recurrences. Some actions supervisors can take at this point include

 

  1. Determine if any obvious risks contributed to the accident/injury. Walking through the area and talking with other employees who work there can provide insights into potential problems.

 

  1. Take corrective action. Any hazards that are obvious should be eliminated as soon as possible, if not immediately. This may require notifying and working with a safety person or other managers. Supervisors should know and be given authority to make simple corrections that can prevent future accidents.

 

  1. Communicate the risks and any changes to staff.

 

 

The Recovery/Return Phase

 

If a workers’ compensation claim has been filed and the employee is not working, the supervisor’s role should be one of support. The injured worker needs to know he is a valued employee and the organization wants him back at work. If the supervisor has a positive relationship with the worker, she can take the following steps:

 

  1. Initial contact. The supervisor should make the first-day phone call to the injured worker — ask how he is doing, how he feels, and find out what he needs. This is also the time to let the injured worker know what to expect; how/when medical treatment will be provided, who will contact him and for what reason(s), how and when he will receive money, and other aspects of the claims process.

 

  1. Ongoing communication. The first-day phone call is extremely important, but the contact should not end there. The supervisor should stay in touch with the injured worker on a continuing basis, through conversations and by sending get-well cards. In addition to finding out how the worker is progressing, these conversations can provide insight into the worker’s mood and whether he is engaged in his recovery. The supervisor should also relay the latest workplace happenings, so the worker feels kept in the loop.

 

  1. RTW/Transitional duty. Supervisors should be trained on the benefits of returning an injured employee to work as soon as possible, that it is not only best for the organization from a financial standpoint, but usually is best for aiding the worker’s recovery. If the employee cannot return to full duty or his usual work tasks, there should be some type of modified or transitional duty available. The supervisor should be an integral part of this — finding/designing opportunities and guide the injured worker through the process, such as getting the medical restriction information from the treating physician.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Well-run workers’ compensation programs protect employees and save money for their organizations. The supervisor is in the best position to make sure a worker who does get injured has a smooth experience. Therefore, it is vital to make sure they are well trained in all aspects of the program.

 

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center.

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Fourteen Steps Employers Can Take to Manage Workers Compensation Claims

Fourteen Steps Employers Can Take to Manage Workers Compensation ClaimsToo many employers allow their involvement in the workers’ comp claim to end when they send the employee to the doctor. That is a huge mistake and will result in a steady increase in the amount of workers comp insurance premiums. The employer needs to have an established post injury process. It should include:

 

  • Report the claim to the insurer, third-party administrator or self-insured claims office immediately. The supervisor or your workers’ comp claims coordinator should be reporting the claim to the claims office while the employee is still en route to the medical provider.

 

  • Complete the Employer’s First Report of Injury and any other state required paperwork on the claim.   If the injury is severe and the employee will be unable to return to work within the waiting period, provide the claims office with necessary wage information for the calculation of indemnity benefits.

 

  • Advise the claims office of the claimant’s prior history of workers comp claims. The adjuster’s approach to the claim varies significantly between the employee who never had a previous workers comp claim and the employee who has had 15 workers comp claims in the last ten years.

 

  • Review your transitional duty program and find a job the employee can do within the treating physician’s restrictions.

 

  • Be sure the employee’s supervisor (and co-workers if needed) is available to discuss the accident and injury with the claims adjuster and to assist the adjuster with the claims investigation as required.

 

  • Don’t alienate the employee – show empathy to the employee. When employees feel the company does not care about them and their injury and the company owes them, the claim will get ugly when employees think it is time to stick it to the employer.

 

  • Maintain an open dialogue – call the employee at home to show your concern and to offer assistance in processing the workers’ comp claim with the insurance company. Address any employee problems or issues right away. Also, call the employee on a regular basis until s/he is back at work.

 

  • If you are contacted by an attorney representing the employee, notify the claims adjuster immediately.

 

  • Immediately dispute any invalid or fraudulent claim.

 

  • If the employee has a questionable claim or a subjective claim for neck or back injuries, and immediately goes to the television advertising workers comp attorney, or a plaintiff’s attorney-oriented doctor known for excessive disability ratings, advise the employee immediately that you intend to fight the claim as the attorney and/or doctor has a history of inflated claims.

 

  • Monitor the state filings by the adjuster and any other claim related paperwork.

 

  • Monitor the Workers Compensation Board decisions – that means, reading them carefully, not just filing them away. Be ready to protest any finding or order you feel is unfair to you as the employer as all decisions have time limits for disputing the decision, with some time limits as short as 15 days. The board will learn YOU are an employer who takes part actively.

 

  • Monitor the medical progress reports to be sure the treatment is appropriate – for example – no physical therapy for the low back when the injury is a cut finger.

 

  • Always advise the adjuster when the employee returns work – the same day.

 

 

Author Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc. is a national expert in the field of workers compensation. She is a writer, speaker, and publisher. Her expertise is working with employers to reduce workers compensation costs, and her clients include airlines, healthcare, printing/publishing, pharmaceuticals, retail, hospitality, and manufacturing. She is the co-author of the #1 selling book on cost containment, Workers Compensation Management Program: Reduce Costs 20% to 50%.

 

Contact: RShafer@ReduceYourWorkersComp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

 

 

The Real Value of Injury Triage

The real value of injury triageInjury triage has become more common over the last several years. Although the market is still in the process of adopting the service as a best practice, there are fewer risk managers that start off a conversation regarding triage by asking: “What’s that?” Indeed, injury triage is no longer a service only utilized by early-adopting, forward-thinking risk professionals. The service has proven its value in enough settings and employer types that adoption of the service will continue on to virtually all employers who have exposure to work-related injuries.

 

 

Looking at Triage Simply to Reduce Claims Could Miss Bulk of Savings

 

So, what is the reason why more employers, insurers, and carriers are beginning to use the service? The easy answer is that injury triage reduces the number of claims that are produced. By reducing claim volume, one can easily assume that overall claim costs for an employer or insurer will also decrease. This seems logical, right? While that may be true, looking at triage simply as a means to reduce claim frequency might be missing the bulk of the savings and efficiencies gained from use of injury triage.

 

Rather, a strong argument can be made that the real value is delivered through the use of the service from what might be referred to as “second-tier savings.” These are ancillary savings that are often unique to an employer’s situation. Many times the real value of utilizing injury triage has much to do with the specific challenges faced by an employer. For example, an employer that operates on a 24-hour basis or during late-night hours might have a significant dilemma regarding Emergency Room visits. ER’s are typically the only place where medical treatment is available at night. This type of medical treatment is expensive and not conducive to the overall goals of a well-managed workers’ compensation program. The ability of injury triage to greatly reduce the frequency of ER visits would be far more significant to that employer than an employer who operates during normal business hours when there are other accessible healthcare options.

 

 

Evaluate Real Value by Examining All Savings

 

Another example of injury triage’s real value demonstrated through “second-tier savings” would be a contractor or similar business, that is highly sensitive to OSHA recordables. In many cases, these types of businesses must be able to prove that their OSHA recordable rate is below a certain level in order for them to be able to obtain new projects and earn new business. The ability of injury triage to reduce OSHA recordables by making sure that injured employees access the proper level of care can be more valuable than any other benefit. This would not necessarily be the case for employers who are not as sensitive to OSHA recordables; so the real value of injury triage for some contractors lies in ancillary benefits.

 

A strong Return on Investment can be shown simply by looking at injury triage as a means to reduce the number of claims that are produced in any given time period. However, evaluating the real value of injury triage should be done by examining all of the savings the service provides on an employer-specific basis.

 

 

Author Craig Deneau, Medcor, National Practice Leader-Triage Services. Medcor helps employers reduce the costs of workers’ compensation and general health care by providing injury triage services and operating worksite health and wellness clinics. Medcor’s services are available 24/7 nationwide for worksites of any size in any industry. Headquartered in McHenry, Illinois, the company operates 174 clinics and provides triage services to over 90,000 worksites across all 50 states and US territories. Medcor’s triage methods are covered by U.S. & foreign patents, including U.S. No. 7,668,733; 7,716,070; & 7,720,692; other patents pending. Medcor is privately held. Learn more at www.medcor.com.

 

 

The One Quick, Low Cost Activity That Produces Dramatic Work Comp Results

 

Hey there. Michael Stack here, CEO of Amaxx. We’re a couple weeks in now to 2018 and there’s a couple things that I hope you already have accomplished and you already have defined.

 

  • Number One is your goals.
    • Hopefully you’ve clearly defined what it is that you’re looking to accomplish this year in 2018, what that vision is for what that looks like for you and your organization.
  • Number two.
    • Hopefully you’ve been able to determine what metrics for you to track to know whether or not you’re on track to be achieving your goals.

 

If you haven’t done either one of those things then that’s where you start.

 

 

What Are The Required Daily Activities To Accomplish Your Goals?

 

Third piece of this then is what are the activities? What are the disciplines that you need to be doing on a daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, and yearly basis that will moving you closer to accomplishing that very clearly defined vision which you set here in number one?

 

What I want to talk about today is an activity that will cost you the least amount of money. It will cost you the least amount of time and it will have the greatest impact on your work comp program, least amount of money, least amount of time, greatest impact on your work comp program, a very specific activity and discipline we could sending a get well card. Sending a get well card.

 

How long does it take to do that? Maybe three minutes, four minutes, five minutes if you have to get someone else to do it to write the note, maybe stick a little gift in it, put a stamp on it, and write the address and the envelope.

 

 

Impact on One is Profound, Impact on Your Program is World-Class

 

The impact that it can have on that one individual is profound. If you’re doing this consistently on every claim on a week in-week out basis you will build yourself a world class work comp management program. Visions, goals are what we’re looking to accomplish in this year of 2018 happens on a day-to-day basis. What are you doing on a day-to-day basis to achieve your goals? If you’re not doing a get well card it’ll cost you least amount of money. It will cost you the least amount of time and it will have the greatest impact on your work comp program.

 

I encourage you immediately after following this video to write one today, and then write one again next week and the week after that to build that discipline and build that habit.

 

Again, I’m Michael Stack, CEO of Amaxx. Remember your work today in workers compensation, it can have a dramatic impact on your company’s bottom line, but it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life, so be great.

 

To Learn More: HOW TO MEASURE WORKERS’ COMP SUCCESS WITH 5 CRITICAL METRICS:
https://hw359.infusionsoft.com/app/orderForms/Instruction-Guide—5-Critical-Metrics

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers’ compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their workers’ comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is a co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2018 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Enhance Cheer and Happiness to Prepare for 2018


Hey there. Michael Stack here, CEO of Amaxx. This is my final video blog of 2017. As we’re in the very heart of the holiday season, there’s two wishes that I wanted to pass along for you. One is cheer and the second is happiness. One is cheer and the second is happiness.

 

 

Cheer & Happiness Often Lack Meaning but Are Powerful

 

Now, while those two words sound like they’re on the front of a holiday card and lack meaning, when you actually drill down into the real essence of both of those words, cheer and happiness, it could do such a profound impact on your life, both personally and professionally. When you can bring that cheer, when you can bring that happiness, when you bring that smile to the office, when you bring it to your family, when you bring it to your work comp program, it’s amazing the impact it can have on your life, both personally and professionally.

 

I wish you a very sincere amount of cheer and happiness to bring that to the table, to finish up this year, appreciate all the good that’s happened, and there’s been a lot of nonsense that’s happened this year as well, but taking the time to appreciate the good and focus on bringing that cheer, bringing that happiness, so that we can go back after it again in 2018.

 

 

Take the Time to Prepare for 2018

 

I won’t be sending out my newsletter for the week of Christmas or the week of New Years, so I’ll be taking two weeks off, so that I can enjoy that cheer and happiness with my own family. We’ll be heading to New York City. We’re going to see the Radio City Rockettes, we’re going to go to Central Park, see the windows, see the Rockefeller tree, and really take that time so that I’ll be ready to go after it right along with you.

 

Thank you very much for your support this year. Thank you very much for your interest in this material. It allows me to do this work that I love. I very much appreciate you and your support. I hope you have a merry Christmas. I hope you have a happy holiday, and hope all of us have a wonderful New Year.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center. .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

15 Activities Every Employer Can Do Post Workers’ Comp Injury

Too many employers end their involvement in the workers compensation claim  when they send the employee to the doctor. A bad mistake – one resulting in a steady increase in the amount of your workers compensation insurance premium.

 


The employer needs to have an established post injury process to include:

 

  1. Report the claim to the insurer, third party administrator or self-insured claims office immediately. Ideally the supervisor or your workers compensation claims coordinator reports the claim to the claims office while the employee is still en-route to the medical provider.  Or, you can start the process by calling nurse triage, a great way to make sure the employee gets the RIGHT kind of medical treatment. In some cases, the injury will not turn into a claim by using nurse triage.
  2. Complete the Employer’s First Report of Injury and any other state required paperwork on the claim. If the injury is severe and the employee is unable to return to work within the waiting period, provide the claims office with necessary wage information for the calculation of indemnity benefits.
  3. Advise the claims office of the claimant’s prior history of workers compensation claims. The adjuster’s approach to the claim varies significantly between the employee who never had a workers compensation claim and the employee who with 15 workers compensation claims in the last ten years.
  4. Provide the adjuster with relevant information about the employee. In many situations this may include employee information such as employment application, job description, list of medical absences, list of disputes with employee/employer disputes.
  5. Review your transitional duty program and find a job the employee can do within the treating physician’s restrictions. Have a job bank with tasks in multiple departments set up and ready to go, so there is no delay in placing every injured employee in a transitional duty task. In most states, it is best to  pay as close to their original pay as possible to reduce indemnity payments.
  6. Be sure the employee’s supervisor (and co-workers if needed) is available to discuss the accident and injury with the claims adjuster and to assist the adjuster with the claims investigation.
  7. Don’t alienate the employee – show empathy to the employee. When employees feel the company does not care about them and their injury and the company owes them, the claim gets ugly if employees feel it is time to stick it to the employer.
  8. Maintain an open dialogue – call the employee at home to show your concern and to offer assistance on processing the workers compensation claim with the insurance company. Address any employee problems or issues right away. Also, call the employee on a regular basis until s/he is back at work. Make this contact procedure the same for all employees.
  9. If an attorney representing the employee contacts you, notify the claims adjuster immediately.
  10. Immediately dispute any invalid or fraudulent claim. Assume every employee who reports an injury is injured, but when you notice things don’t add up, let your adjuster know. Using nurse triage services greatly reduces fake injury reporting because a nurse specialized in triage will ask many questions about the medical condition, and most employees faking an injury will look for easier prey.
  11. If the employee has a questionable claim, or a subjective claim for neck or back injuries, and immediately goes to the attorney advertising workers compensation on television, or a plaintiff’s attorney-oriented doctor known for excessive disability ratings, advise the employee immediately of your intention to fight the claim as the attorney and/or doctor has a history of inflated claims.
  12. Monitor the state filings by the adjuster and any other claim related paperwork.
  13. Monitor the Workers’ Compensation Board decisions – that means, reading them carefully, not just filing them away. Be ready to protest any finding or order you feel is unfair to you as the employer as all decisions have time limits for disputing the decision, with some time limits as short as 15 days.
  14. Monitor the medical progress reports to be sure the treatment is appropriate – for example – no physical therapy for the low back when the injury is a cut finger.
  15. Always advise the adjuster when the employee returns to work – the same day. Double-check to make sure the indemnity payments stop when the employee returns to work.

 

Stay involved with the adjuster, the employee and the medical providers. As long as it’s an open claim, it can affect your experience rating, so dropping the claim on the adjuster’s desk is the WORST thing an employer can do. Ask your broker’s claim VP and the adjusters to discuss the open claims during a round-table discussion often, either weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly.

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center. .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

The Most Common Belief Is NOT A Factor In Workers’ Comp Success

So imagine the scene. You’re at a party or a social gathering, and you’re talking in a conversation with someone that’s an acquaintance. Somebody that you know, but you don’t know really well. And you start talking about what it is that you do for a living.

 

 

“We’ve Been Really Lucky to Not Have Many Injuries”

 

And you mention that you’re a workers’ compensation professional. And the response during that conversation is, “Oh, we’ve been really lucky over the past number of x weeks or years that we haven’t had very many injuries at my company.” Or they’ll say, “We’ve been really unlucky, and we’ve had a rash of injuries over the past number of weeks, months, or years.” And you’re likely going to respond with the socially appropriate response that’s says, “Yes, we’ve been really lucky or unlucky, too.” But you’ll know in your heart, or you should know in your heart, that success in injury prevention and injury management has very little to do with luck.

 

 

Success in Workers’ Compensation Has Very Little to Do With Luck

 

Success in injury prevention and injury management has very little to do with luck. Hello, I’m Michael Stack, CEO of AMAXX. And there’s two points that I want you to take out of this video lesson today. One is internalizing that fact, that luck, while it may be a small percentage of your success, it’s a very small percentage. Your proactive planning, your culture, your system that you set up to prevent injuries as well as care for those employees after injury to get them successfully back to work is going to be the major dominating factor in the success or failure of your program.

 

 

First Step is to Clarify Workers’ Comp Vision

 

The second piece that I want you to take out is the reason that people say, luck is the major dominant factor in our success or failure in workers’ comp, it’s because there’s no vision, there’s no goal for what you’re trying to accomplish. Because that’s the first step on that path to workers’ comp mastery and workers’ comp success. So here’s how you get started with clarifying that vision for your organization.

 

I want you to answer this question:

 

If I were to wave a magic wand, and in one year from today, you have the perfect workers’ compensation, injury management and prevention program.

 

Answer these three questions:

 

  1. What does that look like for your organization? What does that look like for your organization? If you had this perfect program, draw that out in a paragraph sentence type format.
  2. What does that feel like for you, as the person that designed and implemented this program successfully? What does that feel like for your employees?
  3. What has that done for your culture? What has this done for your organization? What has it done for your employees’ values? What has it done for your employees’ attitudes? What has it done for the culture of your organization? And what has it done for your company’s bottom line?

 

If I were to wave a magic wand and in one year from today, you could have the perfect workers’ compensation program, what does that look like at your organization? What does that feel like for you and your organization? What has that done for your career, what has that done for your employees, what has that done for your company’s bottom line? If you can clearly define that vision, you are well on your way to success. Again, I’m Michael Stack with Amaxx. And remember your work today in workers’ compensation can have a dramatic impact on your company’s bottom line. But it will have a dramatic impact on someone’s life. So be great!

 

 

Michael Stack - AmaxxAuthor Michael Stack, CEO Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder & lead trainer of Amaxx Workers’ Comp Training Center. .

 

Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

Workers’ Comp Roundup Blog: http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/

 

©2017 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

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