Create A Workers’ Compensation GPS

Few managers would consider travel to a distant location without a global positioning system (GPS) on how to get to their destination.  The GPS provides precise information on the directions to travel and when to make a turn which impacts reaching the final destination. When precise directions are not available, it is easy to get lost.

 

Employers who attempt to handle their workers’ compensation claims without precise guidelines on how to get from the initial injury to the conclusion of the claim often get lost along the way, causing the injury claim to take longer and cost the employer additional time and money.

 

 

Written Claim Handling Protocols Should Be Established

 

Written claim handling protocols should be established by each employer outlining exactly what will be done on every workers’ compensation claim by the workers’ compensation coordinator, by the employee’s supervisor and by the employee.  While all the duties, responsibilities and steps each party should take in the handling of a worker’s compensation claim is beyond the scope of this blog, the following is a general overview of the most important steps.

 

 

The workers’ compensation coordinator’s road map would include:

 

  • Oversee pre-injury training of supervisors on what to do in case of an injury
  • Oversee pre-injury training of employees on what to do in case of an injury
  • Reporting of the injury claim to the claims office
  • Coordinating with all involved parties to insure compliance with the workers’ compensation claim protocols including:
    • Post-injury response
    • Verifying a complete investigation into the cause of the injury is completed
    • Arranging for transitional duty
    • Overseeing the return-to-work program
  • Verify compliance with the proper filing of all state forms
  • Verify compliance with the paper work requirements including:
    • Employee Report of Incident
    • Work Ability Form
    • Witness Report Form(s)
    • Supervisor Report
  • Keep on-going contact with the injured employee until the claim is concluded

 

 

The key points on the supervisor’s road map would include:

 

  • Arrange immediate medical attention for an employee when an injury occurs
  • Provide the employee with a Work Ability Form to take with them to the medical provider
  • Accompany the employee to the initial emergency treatment
  • Arrange for the medical provider to return the Work Ability Form to the employer within 24 hours of the initial medical visit
  • Arrange transitional duty work for the employee who has work restrictions

 

 

The employee’s road map would include:

 

  • Participation in all safety training to prevent injuries from occurring
  • Review and study of the employer’s requirements of the employee when an injury occurs
  • Know the required (or recommended) medical provider(s)
  • Present the Work Ability Form to the medical provider at the first medical treatment
  • Participate in the return-to-work transitional duty program
  • Keep the workers’ compensation coordinator and the supervisor advised of the medical progress

 

 

Many Work Comp Problems Can Be Prevented With Proper Education

 

The establishment of written protocols that have been provided to the employee will eliminate the “I didn’t know that” excuse and is a major control point in preventing the employee from getting lost on the road to recovery.  By educating the employee on what is expected if a workers’ compensation injury occurs, many of the problems that can develop on a work comp claim will be prevented.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

You May Be Inviting Higher Workers Comp Costs

When employees can make more staying home than working, there is very little incentive to return to work.

 

 

Collateral Source Benefits

 

A collateral source benefit acts as a “collateral source” of income or perk. It creates a situation where an injured employee has an incentive NOT to work.

 

While providing certain benefits can foster employee loyalty for many productive years, sometimes these benefits can be offset without a complete injury management program and excellent employee communication.

 

Involve all departments in designing, administering and maintaining policies. In a large company, human resources, labor and industrial relations, and employee benefits and compensation as well as workers’ comp departments must all be involved. Incentives to remain at and return to work must be built into management systems. Disincentives must be removed from all direct and indirect sources. Substantial savings can be achieved when a company coordinates its salary, benefits and compensation programs so employees are not rewarded by staying out of work.

 

The following are employee perks that may form disincentives to returning to work:

 

Salary and Wage Continuation

Some companies pay 100 percent of salary instead of an employee collecting workers’ compensation for short term injuries.

 

Occupational Injury Pay Supplements

Some companies pay supplemental benefits to make up the difference between workers’ compensation benefits and regular earnings.

 

Open-Ended Job Return

Holding open an employee’s job indefinitely does not encourage them to return to work as quick as possible. Instead, employers should hold jobs open for a specific time period, such as six or nine months.

 

Vacation and Sick Time

Companies frequently allow vacation and sick time to accrue for employees on workers’ compensation. Some even allow employees to “borrow” more sick time if they need to stay out of work longer.

 

Short-Term Disability

In some companies, disabled employees receive STD benefits after six weeks. However, the standard definition for the disability policy may differ from that of workers’ comp, allowing an employee to collect both. Combined with some personal insurance policies, this double income means that the worker’s at-home pay exceeds their at-work pay. Eliminate double dipping. Although an employee’s personal insurance is their own, employers should deduct workers’ compensation from other duplicative company payments. Otherwise this encourages malingering.

 

Perk Continuation

Employers often maintain ancillary benefits and privileges such as car allowances, club and professional dues, company store privileges and periodical subscriptions for employees on leave.

 

Loan Protection Policies

Individual insurance policies are available to pay mortgages and consumer loans such as car loans and credit card debts in the case of a disability. Credit disability insurance may eliminate house and car payments while being unable to work.

 

Unemployment Compensation

In a few states, an employee receiving workers’ comp also can qualify for state unemployment benefits under certain circumstances. To prevent this form of double dipping, companies should offer all injured workers transitional jobs they can perform even with their physical restrictions. Under the eligibility rules, workers who refuse such offers will not be deemed unemployed as they must be both able and available for suitable work.

 

Pension and Retirement Plans

If these plans do not allow for offset of workers’ comp benefits, an employee can receive workers’ compensation benefits and a full pension.

 

Legal Actions

An employee can file a product liability action against the manufacturer of a product that injured him to collect damages. If the employee was injured in a motor vehicle accident, there may be insurance proceeds involved. The employer should seek reimbursement for workers’ comp payment from any such settlement.

 

 

To prevent driving up your costs, ask yourself: What Benefits Are Injured Workers Getting by Not Working?

 

Many companies fail to look closely enough at their internal wage and benefits structure when looking to reduce workers’ compensation costs. Look for these collateral income sources that provide built-in disincentives to remaining injury-free or returning to work. Even such things as reduced childcare and commuting expenses while at home can be disincentives to returning to work.

 

If not properly coordinated, a company’s employee benefit and compensation programs may inadvertently serve to extend workers’ compensation absences.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Incentivizing The Right Work Comp Outcomes

Hello, Michael Stack here, Principal of Amaxx, founder of COMPClub and co-author of Your Ultimate Guide to Mastering Workers’ Comp Costs. I recently put together a series on the National Workers’ Compensation Conversation. There was a meeting that was held in Dallas on May 10th and 11th of 2016 where 39 stakeholders came together. That series details all the information and discussion that was had at that meeting. It also reviews the political history and, the imperative issues that were identified throughout the course of the National Conversation. As a follow-up to that series, I put together a town hall webinar, where I asked for the input and perspective from those within the workers’ compensation industry. Everyone was invited to participate that wanted to. What I want to do today is go over the main theme that was discussed in the town hall webinar, as well as how that can impact both the national conversation and your organization.

 

 

Incentivizing The Right Work Comp Outcomes

 

The main theme that was discussed from the multiple participants and the multiple people that added on that town hall webinar was this idea of incentives, and incentivizing the right work comp outcomes, and how right now, as we’re set up, that’s not the way the system currently works, so I want to just detail this out and just very quickly, if you want to know all the details of the imperative issues, and go through that in detail, I highly recommend checking out that Workers’ Comp National Conversation series that I put together. You’ll find it extremely informative.

 

 

The Longer A Claim Goes On, The More Revenue Is Generated

 

For this purpose, today, we’re just going to look at something very simple. Let’s look at the costs of a claim over time, and really how this works. The longer a claim goes on, and obviously this isn’t to scale, but the longer a claim goes on, the more expensive that claim becomes, and here was the idea that was talked about, really, on that town hall webinar from the various perspectives.

 

This is the profit line of all the different stakeholders in the industry. That includes claims management, that includes vendors, that includes medical providers, that includes various vendors that are servicing that claim. The profit and the revenue from those various providers increases the longer a claim goes on, and the more expensive that claim becomes, so that was one issue that was discussed throughout the course of that webinar.

 

 

Collateral Source Benefits

 

Second issue, then, is from the employee side, and let’s take a look at this, and we deem this, we call this collateral source benefits, and let’s say, from an employee standpoint, this is what that employee brings in net, of one example I’m just going to use childcare as an example of a collateral source benefits. Net of childcare expenses, this is what that employee brings in on a weekly or monthly basis.

 

Now let’s take a look at that individual on workers’ comp insurance. They’re getting 66 and 2/3 percent of their income, and they have no childcare expense. Now they might be bringing in this much money monthly.

 

They might actually be making more money out of work than they are actually working, and one of the parents now gets to stay home with the child or children. Collateral source benefits can incentivize the wrong thing. The way that our industry is currently set up can incentivize a wrong outcome. I’m not going to have an answer for what this looks like on a national conversation level today, but what I do what to do is start to present and float the idea as something that needs to be a part of this conversation moving forward, needs your perspective and your input for how we can now start to solve this issue of incentivizing the wrong outcomes the way that the current system operates.

 

 

Accountable Care Organizations

 

What I want to do now is start to look at how this can impact your organization and some other examples of things that have been done to now start to try to incentivize these right outcomes, and the first thing that I want to give an example of is these ACOs, or accountable care organizations.

 

These were designed to now incentivize the right outcome, because providers, medical providers, are compensated for the quality of their care and the outcome with the patient, rather than the amount of treatments that they give, so the provider is compensated for the quality of their care, as well as the outcome of the patient, rather than the amount of treatments, or amount of surgeries, that they are now performing. That starts to now really fall under this umbrella of incentivizing the right outcomes. One example for us to start to think about and look to in our industry, obviously easier said than done.

 

 

Cost Allocation / Charge Back System

 

What is a reasonable thing to expect is now to bring this idea to your organization? Bring this idea of incentivizing the right outcomes to your organization, so here’s what I want to give an example of, of how to do this. Call the cost allocation or our chargeback system, and I want to give a very quick example of this. Let’s say you have 3 divisions in your company. Each of them has $100,000 in losses.

 

We know that the activities that produce the best outcomes are getting a claim reported immediately, and getting that employee back to work. It creates lower workers’ compensation cost, and it creates a better outcome for the employee, for the injured worker, so you design a cost allocation, you design a chargeback system, based on those 2 metrics, and here’s what this looks like. In this first edition, they’re not doing a great job of getting their claims reported timely. They’re not hitting the metrics that you’ve designed, so they’re charged that full $100,000 in work comp losses. Division number 2, they’re doing a little bit better in their injury reporting, but they’re not doing a great job in getting their employees back to work, so they’re charged $80,000, so they get that savings of $100,000, and that division leader, the person that’s in charge of this particular division, now seeds $20,000 more on that organization’s bottom line for that particular period. This final division, then, they’re doing a great job with getting claims reported timely.

 

They’re getting a great job getting their employees back to work, they have a transitional duty job bank, they’re working with their medical providers, they’re working with the system as you’ve created it and laid it out in your organization. Now they get an additional $40,000 in profit on that division leader’s bottom line.

 

Starting to now incentivize the right outcomes of two simple things:

 

  • Getting the claims reported timely
  • Getting their employees back to work.

 

Starting to incentivize the right work comp outcomes. It’s an idea that needs to be a part of the national conversation.

 

Easier said than done, but starting to work towards this idea of incentivizing the right workers’ comp outcomes from a regulatory or systems standpoint, and then taking that same idea and implementing it in your organization in the form of a cost allocation or a chargeback system over multiple divisions, and if you don’t have multiple divisions, starting to put this in play with individual supervisors’ bonuses, individual, different pieces of a same company, to now incentivize the right outcomes to have them do the right activities that create the lowest cost for your organization and best outcomes for the injured workers.

 

Because remember, your success in workers’ compensation is defined by your integrity. So be great!

 

Best Practices in Claims Management: Claim File Roundtable

Workers’ compensation is a volume business for employers, defense attorneys, and the claim management team.  Frequent “claim file roundtables” is one tool that can reduce workers’’ compensation claims and promote better claim handling skills.  It can also lead to creative solutions by involving the interested defense stakeholders.

 

 

What is a Claim File Roundtable?

 

A claim file roundtable is a meeting that is held with the interested stakeholders in workers’ compensation claims to review files, keep everyone apprised of case developments and plan strategy.  The participants for these conferences typically include the employer, claims management team, attorney, a medical advisor if available.

 

 

Employer Involvement

 

Employer involvement in file review conferences is critical.  This should include the workers’ compensation coordinator or someone involved in risk management issues.

 

 

Organizing a Claim File Roundtable

 

These conferences can be set for in-person meetings or via an online conference call service.  The organizer of the individual file conference will set a date and time for the discussion.  The selection of the files to be discussed will usually be set by the discussion coordinator, claim handler, a supervisor, or someone designated within the employer’s workers’ compensation program.

 

There are no set criteria on what files can be selected for review at these conferences.  The claims chosen for discussion can be based on the obstacles the adjuster has encountered in moving the claim forward, important or unique medical such as delayed return to work.  If more than one claim is included for discussion, each file will likely be discussed separately and independently of other claims.

 

 

Benefits of Claim Roundtables

 

There are numerous benefits to having file review conferences.  It not only keeps all interested stakeholders aware of what is going on, but also forces everyone to be fully engaged.  When this takes place, there is a better exchange of ideas and results.

 

  • File Conferences Move Claims Forward. Members of the claim management team and employer representatives are responsible for countless activities that involve actions outside of their open claims.  A file review conference allows everyone to keep abreast of developments on a file and better understand the issues.  They can also lead to strategy on how to settle claims and deconstruct potential internal and external barriers to settlement.

 

  • File Review Conferences Involve & Educate the Employer. Employers and their representatives are often on the front lines of workers’ compensation claims.  They have the most relevant information to share about the injured party and the possibility for return to work.  Regularly scheduled file review conferences also allow the employer to take a deeper look at what is going on in their business and understand the anatomy of individual claims, as well as see trends within their company or industry.

 

  • File Review Conferences Allow Parties to Offer Different Perspectives. The interested stakeholders in workers’ compensation claims all come from different backgrounds.  They also have different education and vocational histories.  With these differing experiences, parties will view matters different.  These differing opinions and views can promote an environment that helps solve problems

 

Conclusions

 

The use of file review conferences should involve all interested stakeholders of a workers’ compensation claim.  These conferences can result in decreased costs to any workers’ compensation program when used effectively.

 

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

A Statutory Employer Becomes Actual Employer By Law

A statutory Employer is an entity that becomes an actual employer by Law or Rule.  These laws and rules are designed to protect an employee against not being covered for workers compensation benefits due to a lack of insurance or fuzzy employer-employee arrangements.

 

The most common situation is in the construction industry.  Wide spread use of subcontractors, independent craftsmen, and joint-venture contracts can leave gaps in benefit protection for injured employees.

 

Most general contractors and property owners in construction are quite familiar with their exposures for becoming a Statutory Employer. They normally protect themselves by using hold harmless and indemnification agreement contracts.   They often require that they be named as an also insured by endorsements to workers compensation, general liability, and property insurance policies.

 

 

Other Exposures for Statutory Employment:

 

A few other situations that can lead to statutory employment and require the payment of workers compensation benefits are:

 

  • Using individuals who may not qualify for workers compensation by statute. (Single Proprietors, Senior Corporate Officers, Domestics, and Juveniles are a few examples)

 

  • Over control, long term use, or direction of temporary or leased employees.

 

  • Improper job classifications and poor job descriptions.

 

  • Poor contract wording or intent with the contracted entity.

 

  • Failure to document insurance and request being a named insured on insurance policies.

 

  • Definitions of employers by government agencies such as the IRS
    • The IRS defines statutory employees for social security and Medicare taxes.
    • These employment functions include drivers, insurance sales, traveling sales, and work done at private residences. While these requirements may not create a workers compensation statutory exposure, they might be used by a claimant in a litigation situation.  (See IRS Publication Employer’s Supplemental Tax Guide 15-A for full details and compliances.  Have an attorney review if your organization for any of these situations.)

 

 

  • Voluntary persons

 

  • Part-time persons

 

  • Situations where the work function being done by the non-employee is primary to the employer’s business.

 

  • Challenges to the enforceability of hold harmless and indemnification clauses based on language, vagueness, or public policy.

 

 

Protections and Precautions:

 

Before embarking on the use of sub-contractors, independent technical s, temporary and part-time employees, volunteers, as well as leased employees plan carefully.  A few items to consider are:

 

  1. Weigh the pros and cons of using this type of entity to accomplish the task needing to be done.
  2. Consider the education, qualification and experience levels needed.
  3. Research local employment laws, rules and regulations that may impact their use.
  4. Review recent legal decisions that have come down that might have destroyed or mitigated prior defenses.
  5. Review agencies or government entities that might be defining statutory employment.
  6. Research contracts and facts where the courts have sustained defenses in statutory employment challenges.
  7. Use an attorney specializing in developing contracts, and protections for non-employees.
  8. Insist that all entities being hired have all their insurance policies endorsed naming the hiring organizations as also insureds. Insist on adequate limit amounts of coverage and defense costs.  (Some claims made policies add defense cost or reduce them from the coverage limit.)  Insist on reinsurance coverages when primary carrier limits are not sufficient to meet catastrophic losses.  It is also a good idea to have an endorsement extending the policy for claims made or not reported during actual work contract time.

 

Summary:

 

There are numerous areas when use of non- employees can make an organization a statutory employer.

While defenses are being attacked and diminished, good planning, tight contracts and proper insurance endorsements can still protect against losses and statutory employment claims.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Work Comp Grand Bargain and The 100 yr Old Lesson

Hello. Michael Stack here, principal of Amaxx, founder of COMPClub, and co-author of “Your Ultimate Guide to Mastering Worker’s Comp Costs.” A lot of questions these days about the current work comp system and if it’s the right system to handle workplace injuries, a big question about if it’s fair and if it’s adequate. In that discussion is a lot of talk about this term “the grand bargain.” What I want to do is talk about really what is the grand bargain and why was it created, what lessons can we then take from that discussion, which was over 100 years ago, and apply that today to your organization to start to see some better outcomes and improvements in your work comp costs.

 

Anger, frustration, fear, anxiety, public uprising, political discussion, various stakeholders representing their organizations’ interests. I’m not describing 2016. I’m describing 1906. That was the state of the country at the time, the state of public opinion at the time, that injuries that were happening to individuals were not right.

 

 

Was Uproar in Public Opinion That No Value Given to Human Capital

 

There were stories of John Taylor, 27-year-old mining worker. He had a wife, Barbara, two young kids, Jane and Tommy. John would work in the mine on a day-to-day basis, very hard to support his family. One day, John got injured. He was delivered to his family’s doorstep, to Barbara’s doorstep, with a serious injury and no compensation whatsoever for that injury. No medical costs were paid; no wages were paid. The only way for John and his family to get compensation for that injury was to bring a lawsuit against his employer. It was very expensive to hire an attorney, very expensive to go through that litigation process, and also very slow. Employers had a number of defenses that they used that most of these employee lawsuits were not won, things like assumption of risk. You knew it was risky to work in that mine, or contributory negligence, that if John was somehow also responsible for his own injury, that that lawsuit would have been lost. They would have lost that claim for compensation.

 

It caused a massive uprising in public opinion, a massive view that human capital was not valued, that employees were not valued, and that that wasn’t right, that they were being treated like a machine and tossed to the side and then a new person could just come in to replace them. Something had to be done about this, because that system wasn’t working.

 

 

Work Injuries Were Putting Companies Out Of Business

 

Let’s look at the other side of the coin. Brian O’Grady came over from Ireland to start his organization. He was an entrepreneur. He was also supporting his family. He also had a couple of young children and a wife and trying to build a better future for them. He built up the Acme Company, had a couple hundred employees. One day, an employee got seriously injured, brought a lawsuit against the Acme Organization, was able to prove negligence, and got a massive award, $250,000 award that put Brian’s company out of business. Now his family was also left to struggle to support their financial needs.

 

 

System Wasn’t Working For Employees or Employers

 

The system wasn’t working for employees, and it wasn’t working for employers, either. Wild swings in these awards and most employees not being compensated for their injuries, so they created this system and came up with the grand bargain, which we talk about a lot today. What did each party get throughout the course of this discussion, also very political discussion at the time? Let’s talk about what the employees got in this grand bargain, and let’s talk about what the employers got and how it really was a benefit for both parties.

 

 

Wins For Employees In Grand Bargain

 

The employees, the biggest thing that they got was the fact that this was a no fault system. They had to prove negligence. John Stanley had to prove that his organization was negligent in order for them to be compensated whatsoever for that injury, so they got that this was a no fault system. You get hurt at your job, it’s in the course and scope of employment, your medical bills will be paid, and your indemnity will be paid, and those were the other benefits here, so indemnity, wage loss, your medical bills, and a few others. These are the most common benefits that come with worker’s compensation. There are a few other things that come with it that are less common, but are certainly important pieces of the discussion. Vocational rehab, permanency awards, and then also death benefits. Again, not as common, but certainly a very important piece of this current discussion, but those were the main benefits throughout the course of the discussion in the grand bargain. No fault, indemnity, medical, and various benefits.

 

 

Wins For Employers In Grand Bargain

 

What did the employers, then, get? What was their win in this grand bargain discussion? Two really main things that the employers got was they got the ability to transfer risk and they got the ability to budget for these workplace injuries, so those massive swings in awards, companies like the Acme Company that had to be put out of business because they couldn’t handle the award financially in order to continue to survive, they got the ability to then transfer that risk to an insurance company. They also got the ability to budget, to know that I know more or less on a monthly or an annual basis a pretty good range of how much I’m going to be paying for these workplace injuries, so they had the ability to do that.

 

That was the grand bargain. That’s what each party got, and it was a successful solution to that problem. A lot of times, when they created this, they didn’t think that they would even need any attorneys. They didn’t think we would need any litigation, because this really covered the basis of both sides. Obviously, that’s not exactly what happened, and it has gotten very complex.

 

 

100 Year Old Lesson We Can Apply Today

 

What can we now learn from this discussion? What lesson can we learn from this discussion that’s over 100 years old? Here’s, I think, the most important lesson. Worker’s compensation can be extraordinarily complex, but it also can be extraordinarily simple to make an impact at your company. Here’s the lesson. When employees and employers work together, both parties win. When employees and employers work together, both parties win. When employees and employers work together towards a positive outcome, both parties win. If you can remember that very simple lesson that was learned over 100 years ago in the initial discussion of the grand bargain, the initial discussion that solved a lot of these initial problems, your organization will win. Remember, your success in worker’s compensation is defined by your integrity, so be great.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Spotting Fraud to Reduce Work Comp Program Costs

The National Insurance Crime Bureau estimates that workers’ compensation fraud costs employers, insurers, third-party administrators and other interested stakeholders over $7 billion per year.  Fraud is not only illegal, but is an unnecessary tax on everyone.  This includes a negative impact on those workers’ compensation was designed to help—providing medical care and treatment, rehabilitation services and monetary benefits to the injured employee.  Spotting fraud is something that requires teamwork and coordination between all interested parties.

 

 

Identifying Fraud in Workers’ Compensation

 

Fraud is something that takes place every day.  It occur in all workplaces and is not limited to “the bad employee.”  Due to these considerations, employer representatives and members of the claim management team should be mindful of it anytime there is the report of a workplace injury.

 

Common red flags for workers’ compensation fraud include:

 

  • Unwitnessed or unexplained injuries and incidents;
  • Injuries that have a mechanism inconsistent with the alleged mechanism;
  • History of claims and litigation concerning personal injury and other workers’ compensation claims;
  • Injuries that coincide with work stoppages and strikes;
  • Financial strains and economic downturns;
  • Inconsistent injury reports;
  • Lack of cooperation by the employee and witnesses associated with an injury report; and
  • Employees new to the labor market;
  • Injuries that occur on Monday mornings or immediately following a longer holiday weekend.

 

There are several common these in the above scenarios.  This includes the opportunity for the employee to experience an injury outside of work and later report a work incident.  In other instances, there is a hidden incentive for the employee to claim an injury for gain.

 

 

Best Practices for Fighting Workers’ Compensation Fraud

 

The issue of fraud is something that should concern everyone within the workers’ compensation system.  This not only includes members of the claim management team and insurance industry, but workers themselves.  Creating a positive environment within the workplace can help stop fraud and encourage all interested parties to be vigilant.

 

Employers and their representatives must also take an active role.  There are many ways they can do to fight fraud.  This can include educating the workforce about how fraud impacts the bottom line of their company and all employees.  Other steps include:

 

  • Establish and enforce policies that punish those who engage in fraudulent activities;
  • Educate all employees about the workers’ compensation process. This includes easy access to information on state laws concerning work injury reporting and company policies on employee expectations when dealing with an injury or incident;
  • Coordinate with mangers and human resources professionals on the prompt investigation and documentation of all workplace injuries. This includes a review of all incidents for possible fraudulent activities; and
  • Ongoing communication with the injured worker and claims professionals following a work injury.

 

Members of the claims management team also play an important role in snuffing out fraud.  There are a number of things they can do to assist in fraud detection and prevention.  This includes:

 

  • Conducting a complete investigation on all claims. This includes the assessment of claims for warning signs of possible fraud;
  • Explore alternative methods of investigation in claims. An ethical review of all social media outlets is important; and
  • Use of surveillance in claims defense and fraud investigation. This method of discovery can be expensive as use of a private investigator should be over a period of days rather than a one-time occurrence.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Dramatically Improve Employee Goodwill with Effective Communication

Workers’ compensation program administrators and members of the claim management team are constantly seeking new methods to manage their safety program.  This includes the use of safety programs, the implementation of medical management techniques and data analysis.  All of these systems are great.  However, the best way to control the cost of any claim is to stay in contact with injured employees and empathize with their predicament.

 

 

Containment Starts at the Date of Hire

 

Effective employee engagement starts when that person walks through the door on their first day of work.  This includes providing the new employee with useful information they can use prior to a work-related injury.

 

  • Detailed new hire information regarding safety and injury prevention;
  • Policies and procedures on reporting an injury; and
  • Information on post-injury care and return-to-work best practices.

 

 

Promoting Effective Communication on Work Comp Matters

 

Effective communication is important to everyone involved in the workers’ compensation process.  This process starts before the injury takes place and steps into high gear immediately following the injury.

 

Once an injury takes place, it is important for the employer and representatives from the claim management team to focus on the injury.  It is especially important to understand that the injured person has needs—this goes beyond receiving medical care and treatment with compassion.  In cases of a severe injury, it is also important to make sure family members who are entitled to information receive it in a timely manner.

 

Severe injuries also include additional involvement from the employer and a representative with experience in handling complex matters.  Additional attention must also include a focus on accommodating the employee and returning them to work as soon as possible.

 

 

 

Lack of Communication Leads to Problems

 

There are three main reasons why parties who suffer workers’ compensation claims retain legal counsel.  These are CONFLICT, FEAR and GREED.

 

  • CONFLICT: The workers’ compensation process is adversarial.  Small disputes can escalate quickly and be the result of interactions with the employer or a member of the claim management team.  The leading cause of conflict occurs when information about the process is not openly provided to the employee.  Communication that is frequent and complete can minimize conflict and reduce the possibly of unnecessary problems.

 

  • FEAR: When an employee suffers a work-related injury, they receive wage loss benefits.  These benefits are in essence a reduction in their wages.  Unfortunately, the employee does not experience a reduction in their cost of living.  They are also faced with the unknown as it comes to future employment, income/earning capacity and ability to provide for their family.

 

  • GREED: Greed in workers’ compensation is not a one-way street.  In some instances, the rise of a work injury can lead to one party trying to take advantage of the other.  Even if this is not a reality, it can be the mistaken perception.

 

 

Benefits of Communication

 

Effective and continuous communication by the employer can reduce these reasons why injured workers retain legal counsel.  It can also reassure an employee and make them feel they are a valued member of the team.  Ongoing communications with the injured employee should continue for as long as the employee is off work, even with severe injuries where the employee is off for an extended period.  By continuing regular contact with the injured employee, the employee is reassured that the employer does want him/her to return to work.

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

Strengthening Work Comp Programs through Aggressive Subrogation Recovery

The job of a workers’ compensation claim handler and manager goes beyond serving their clients and injured workers.  It also includes watching out for a programs bottom line and seeking creative solutions to complex problems.  This job includes a number of different tasks.  One important role in this area is identifying potential subrogation issues.  This results in reimbursement of monies paid out by a program from third parties playing a role in the work injury.

 

 

Subrogation Defined

 

Subrogation is defined by Black’s Law Dictionary as, “The principle under which an insurer that has paid the loss under an indemnity policy is entitled to take on all the rights and remedies belonging to the insured against a third party with respect to any injuries or breaches covered by the policy.”

 

 

Better Understanding Subrogation

 

To put this in plain English, subrogation is the opportunity to recover under a legal theory when the workers’ compensation insurer is required to make payment in the form of benefits to a party sustaining injuries due to the conduct or action of another.  Imagine the following situation:

 

Employee sustains a work injury while operating a power tool.  As a result of the work injury, the Insurer pays for various medical and indemnity benefits to and on behalf of the Employee.    During the course of investigating the work injury, Insurer discovers the power tool used by the Employee had a design defect.  While the Insurer is obligated to pay for various workers’ compensation benefits, the Insurer also has a right of subrogation against the manufacturer (and other parties) responsible for the defective product.

 

 

Work Comp Subrogation in the Real World

 

Opportunities to seek subrogation happen in more instances than one would think in the modern workplace.  This requires that members of the claim management team investigate their cases and seek opportunities to recover monies in instances where another’s conduct played a role in the injury.

 

Motor vehicle accidents:

 

MVAs are the leading area of subrogation in workers’ compensation claims nationwide.  Every day, thousands of people are involved in MVAs that take place in the course and scope of their employment.  This is an area, which is subject to legal standards outside the area of most non-attorneys understanding.  It is important to consult with attorneys as to the likelihood one can obtain recovery.  When investigating these types of cases, it is important for claims handlers to:

 

  • Obtain police reports regarding the MVA;
  • Secure photographs, witness information and statements as to how the accident occurred; and
  • Determine what insurance companies are involved.

 

 

Premises Liability:

 

The traveling employee or people who work at another’s property are subject to numerous hazards.  This includes parking lots or facilities that are not properly maintained, wet or icy surfaces and other perils.  It is important to act quickly when these types of injuries occur as key evidence can get changed/altered and even destroyed—sometimes accidently.  Key investigation tips include:

 

  • Photographs of the accident scene;
  • Investigate and obtain information as to witnesses to the incidents and their connection with the premises involved; and
  • If these incidents take place at construction site, it is important to obtain information on the use of safety equipment and any OSHA investigation information.

 

 

Products Liability:

 

These incidents occur when employees are working with machinery, heavy equipment and power tools.  It is also important to act fast to preserve the potentially problematic item that contributes to the injury.  It is also important as part of your investigation to determine the following:

 

  • The make, model and year of purchase of the equipment causing the injury; and
  • Whether there were any alterations to the equipment or machine causing the injury, and who made/ordered the changes to be made.

 

 

Conclusions

 

Effective subrogation is an important aspect of every workers’ compensation program.  While the insurance carrier is still required to compensate the injured worker, the recovery of those funds leads to a successful and cost-efficient program.

 

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

WC National Conversation: Regulations, Unintended Consequences, & Standards

WC National Conversation Series:

 

 

Hello Michael Stack here, principle of Amaxx, founder of COMPClub, and co-author of Your Ultimate Guide to Mastering Workers’ Comp Costs. This is my third part in a 3-part series, really highlighting and summarizing the national workers’ compensation conversation. This is a conversation in our industry, and an important one to talk about the current status, and really future of our industry. On May 10th and 11th, 2016, 39 individual stakeholders came together representing various interests and various perspectives at the workers’ compensation summit held in Dallas. The event was hosted by Bob Wilson from workerscompensation.com, and Deputy Chief Judge, David Langham..

 

 

Questions About Fairness & Adequacy of Current System

 

There have been questions about the fairness and adequacy of the current workers’ compensation system, and if that’s the right system to handle workplace injuries today and moving into the future. In the first video, I talked about the pre-summit documents, and went over a lot of the history, and current major issues. If you haven’t looked at that video yet, I highly recommend checking it out. There is a lot of information in there, and I guarantee you’re going to learn something. In the second video, I went over really the bulk of our discussions in Dallas, identifying those imperative issues, and friction points in the industry, that are currently causing a lot of the challenges. In this final video then, I want to talk quickly about some of the specific regulatory points that we identified. Some of the different incentives, and then where are we going to go from here.

 

My three major topics today then, are really communication or lack there of between the regulators and the insurance marketplace. The second about the unintended consequences that come from regulations. Then finally about equity or the fairness of the current work comp system. Then consistency among the states and where we’re going from here.

 

 

Lack of Communication Between State Regulators & Insurance Market

 

Let’s talk first about communication. Communication is imperative in every single aspect of what we do in workers’ compensation management. That is certainly the case when you’re talking about the communication or lack thereof, between the state regulators and the insurance marketplace. I mentioned in the first video the 1972 commission, and the report that they gave. They mentioned this point specifically in that report. They talk about really the lack of understanding among the regulators. Then even once the regulators do understand and have interests in the workers’ compensation industry, now trying to put reforms in place that aren’t going to have these unintended consequences.

 

 

Regulator Perspective

 

Let’s talk quickly about the regulator perspective. In the Dallas summit there were regulators who were in attendance, who were able to gain this perspective. What a regulation does or what the work comp laws do in each state, they provide information and structure regarding the audit. They provide protection, and they provide accountability among the various stake holders to follow these particular laws. A lot of value comes from that structure, without structure then you have chaos and with chaos becomes poor outcomes. It does provide a lot of structure as far as making sure the audits are done properly, making sure the different stake holders are protected, and having that accountability. Too much regulation though can lead to unintended consequences that we’ll talk about in a second.

 

 

Is Vagueness a Benefit or Detriment?

 

A couple different things in regard to regulations that were discussed, was vagueness. Is vagueness a benefit or a detriment. Using words like reasonable, leaves things open to interpretation, leaves things open to litigation. Parallel this with the American with Disabilities law, which I think is very similar in a lot of ways in the outcomes in regards to these employees. In that law, there’s words like reasonable accommodations, words like interactive process, words like undue hardship. Extraordinarily vague terms with leaves things open to a lot of interpretation. Is a word like reasonable in the work comp laws the thing that we want. Is that causing the right outcome? Do we want that to be more specific in the light of the outcome that we’re trying to accomplish? That’s the question there really in regards to what that looks like from a state regulation perspective.

 

 

Who Benefits From Regulations?

 

Finally and I think an important point here, when you’re talking about the value and the communication between regulators and the insurance marketplace, who’s benefiting from these? At the center of the grand bargain is the employee and the employer. The employee and employer at the center of the grand bargain discussion. When you start to get into some of these regulations, why are they in place? Who’s benefiting it? Is it the state that’s benefiting? It’s just making their system easier because this is the way we do it in our office. We need everyone to follow our individual system. We’re not willing to change because of it. Is that benefiting the employee because of that? It’s debatable. Is it benefiting the employer? It’s certainly debatable. The two parties that are at the center of this work comp grand bargain discussion, who is benefiting from these regulations? Having that part of discussion, and is it a part of the discussion at the regulation level? Sometimes yes, a lot of times though, no.

 

 

 

Unintended Consequences

 

Sunset Regulations

 

That brings us then to the next point, which is unintended consequences. When a regulator will write these laws and pass them, it’s for good intentions. They will generally have good intentions because they’re trying to put this protection, this accountability to have things run smoothly in their states, for their employees, for their employers, and for the various stakeholders involved in the work comp system. Let’s talk about some of the unintended consequences that occur. A lot of the stories when you hear about the reforms, of the reforms, of the reforms, are because of this very point. The first point that was discussed is how do you then get rid of regulations. Maybe a regulation was created because it needed to be. An issue was coming up and there was a lack of accountability or there was a lack of protection for a certain group. You needed to pass a regulation to do that.

 

That regulation is now irrelevant. Now it continues year, after year, after year, after year. It’s not benefiting the states really. It’s not benefiting the employees. It’s benefiting the employers. It’s an irrelevant regulation. It’s causing additional reforms, additional burden, additional costs on the work comp industry. Where’s the benefit? How do you get rid of these regulations that are irrelevant? What if the states talked about a task force that’s actively reviewing their regulations? Actively reviewing their forms and getting rid of the ones that are unnecessary, getting rid of the ones that are not causing any benefit, that are just driving up costs.

 

 

Cost Burden

 

Which leads me then to the next point and this is a big one. Any regulation, even a small change can put a tremendous burden of cost on the insurance marketplace. Let’s talk about an example here. Data is certainly becoming more popular, particularly analytics are becoming more popular. The world in general has a hunger for data. That is certainly true and certainly relevant in our industry, even at the state level. Let’s say the states ask the carriers, TPAs, self-insureds, everyone submitting data to the state, they just ask them for one more data element. They want us to provide us with one more data element. The cost and burden that puts on the industry is millions and millions of dollars. Now every one of the vendors, every one of the employers, every one of the carriers, TPAs, has to reprogram their system now to add this one data element. What benefit is that giving to the employers? What benefit is that giving to the employees? The injured workers, the employers, at the heart of this grand bargain conversation. That’s the question and the unintended consequence, enormous cost burden put on the industry.

 

 

Incentives

 

Which brings us then to the next point, when you talk about these incentives. I talked about these before in the last video. I want to hit on it here. Often will be an unintended consequence of a state regulation that causes some of these problems and causes human behavior then to adjust. Let’s give an example of this. The claim costs as they go down … I’m sorry, as the claim outcome goes down it gets worse. The claim costs go up. I want to use an example here of a medical fee schedule. We’ve seen this passed in many states. A state will pass a fee schedule to drive down those costs and try to keep a hold of this. Where is the incentive then from a human nature standpoint?

 

We talked about some of those medical providers. Maybe some of the bad actors that now say, “Well I don’t really care about the outcome. All I want to do is increase my revenue.” My incentive then is to increase the amount of treatments. If I’m getting less for a certain treatment, I’m going to maybe do a different treatment, or I’m going to do more treatments, so that my revenue can remain the same. The lawyer will have the incentive to drive up the costs of the claim so that their fee can be higher. Some of these incentive points that are unintended consequences of certain regulations.

 

 

What Incentive Exists For Employers, The Most Important Party

 

The last point then here and a big one in regards to incentives, the party that has the most control, the most incentive to do right, the most incentive to get their employees back to work, the most incentive to report those claims timely, work with medical providers for these positive outcomes, is the employers. The employers are also the least educated and least involved in general. There are certainly the A students that are doing tremendous work in regards to work comp management. Putting systems in place, putting some resources in place, to actively involve their employers, their company in this process of working with their employees to get back to work. They see these dramatically positive results. It’s not a question of how to do it. That system has been defined and proven over years, and years, and years, and hundreds and thousands of employers that follow that system.

 

The question then is how do you incentivize those employers to care? The small to medium size employers, or even the large employers, that are feeling it in the pocketbook, or maybe they’re not feeling it in the pocketbook. They only have a couple of claims per year but now they don’t know how to handle it. That five percent of claims that causes eighty percent of the lost time in cost, which we talked about in prior videos, that’s where that comes. It comes from these ill prepared employers, these employers that are not involved. How do you then incentivize the most important party in this discussion to get involved in the discussion and in the management of their injuries? A hugely important point there in regards to the employers.

 

 

 

Consistency Among States

 

Which brings me then to my last point, which is really this idea of consistency among the states, and where we want to see this thing go from here. You talk about really back to that 1972 reform which I mentioned early at the beginning of this video series. It was mentioned at the beginning of that work comp summit. It was a major study that was done. They recommended nineteen different minimum standards for what the states should follow. It was really never implemented from a national or a federal level, that the states had to meet those regulations. The states met the call throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. Then as since has continued to deteriorate from there. The question is, is that where we are today? Are we in need of that uniformity? Are we in need of those recommendations or those minimum standards? It’s a question of figuring out where we want to go then as an industry.

 

 

Huge Variations In State Benefits

 

There are huge variations among the states. There’s huge differences among the different states. It becomes very traumatic when you’re reading like a pro public report. You see the costs of an arm in one state is X, and in another state it’s Y. It doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense, and lends our industry to criticism. It makes the outsider look in and say, “Well that doesn’t seem fair.” It makes me question the entire system. It makes me question the entire industry, when we know that the vast majority of claims go through the system, and it’s a hugely beneficial protection for injured workers, and also for employers. Really saving them, allowing them to budget, really reducing their amount of liability for some wide swings and negligence claims, that could put them out of business.

 

 

Are We Looking For More Uniformity?

 

Those huge variations lends our industry to criticism. Is that where we are today? Are we looking for uniformity? Is the fact that we have fifty states and fifty different interpretations of the law, actually one of our greatest benefits? That’s up for you to decide. That’s up for our industry to decide, to have this discussion as far as where we want to see this go from here. I’ve gone through what that discussion was in Dallas. This is where we left it. There was a lot of hesitation in really talking about exactly what the goal is of this conversation. I’m going to leave that for you to ponder. How that would impact you. Talk about what is this ideal outcome? What are we trying to look for? A positive person for one person can be a very negative outcome for another. There’s so many stakeholders involved. How do we now come together as an industry, and decide where we want to go from here?

 

 

Join The Conversation

 

A couple of upcoming opportunities for you to give involved in this discussion, which I’ll be reporting on in the recent weeks and months to come. There’s a town hall webinar that I’ll be hosting. You are invited to participate. It’s going to be Thursday, June 9th at one o’clock pm eastern standard time. It’ll be a 50-minute live webinar that I’ll be moderating and asking for your input on this material. Some different things that maybe we didn’t cover or I didn’t cover throughout the course of this video series, and different perspectives that you want to share. Also talking about your goals and where you want to see this go from here. The next time we’ll be getting together as a group will be in August. From that group that originally met in June and I’ll be reporting on that summit discussion as well.

 

I want to thank you for your participation in this series. I want to thank you for your interests in following along with this material. This industry can’t get to where it needs to get to without your input and without your perspective. Remember, your success in workers’ compensation is defined by your integrity, so be great!

 

 

 

Author Michael Stack, Principal, COMPClub, Amaxx LLC. He is an expert in workers compensation cost containment systems and helps employers reduce their work comp costs by 20% to 50%.  He works as a consultant to large and mid-market clients, is co-author of Your Ultimate Guide To Mastering Workers Comp Costs, a comprehensive step-by-step manual of cost containment strategies based on hands-on field experience, and is founder of COMPClub, an exclusive member training program on workers compensation cost containment best practices. Through these platforms he is in the trenches on a working together with clients to implement and define best practices, which allows him to continuously be at the forefront of innovation and thought leadership in workers’ compensation cost containment. Contact: mstack@reduceyourworkerscomp.com.

 

 

©2016 Amaxx LLC. All rights reserved under International Copyright Law.

 

Do not use this information without independent verification. All state laws vary. You should consult with your insurance broker, attorney, or qualified professional.

 

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